Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 26

Thread: ultralight for spam-can pilot

  1. #1

    ultralight for spam-can pilot

    I've been flying a 172 for a long time and a Stinson before that, so at least I have tailwheel time. I've been thinking about a 103-legal UL for a long time, something to fly local when the winds are low. I like the mini-max for the conventional/tractor setup and the fact that so many are flying. I'm worried about the handling being so different than what I'm used to especially with sudden loss of power. Are there other models I should be looking at? I know an UL will not handle like a cessna, good thing, but I know some are less "conventional" than others. I'd also like to stay with fairly common models for parts/support. May elect to build but will probably buy a completed aircraft. And would consider registered/LSA model but trying to stay low-cost.

    Bob

  2. #2
    steveinindy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    1,449
    As a former UL pilot myself, I'll ask you the same first question one of my friends asks someone when they call him about getting started in ultralights: "How much do you weigh?" A lot of folks in modern day America are ill-suited to fly ultralights simply because of their own mass. That may be the biggest thing (no pun intended) that makes an LSA a better option.
    Unfortunately in science what you believe is irrelevant.

    "I'm an old-fashioned Southern Gentleman. Which means I can be a cast-iron son-of-a-***** when I want to be."- Robert A. Heinlein.



  3. #3

    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    112
    (My opinion here) the biggest handling difference will be in the flare for landing, the typical UL is high drag with LOTS of parasitic drag so the flare must be made spot on or you must carry some power to let the craft settle, if you don't it will drop in and the construction being light will bend /break ect.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Oklahoma City, OK
    Posts
    204
    Quote Originally Posted by steveinindy View Post
    As a former UL pilot myself, I'll ask you the same first question one of my friends asks someone when they call him about getting started in ultralights: "How much do you weigh?" A lot of folks in modern day America are ill-suited to fly ultralights simply because of their own mass. That may be the biggest thing (no pun intended) that makes an LSA a better option.

    Steve:
    What is a "good/no more than" weight for a U/L pilot? Is 140 to 190ish an ok/average weight?

  5. #5
    Getting pretty personal now aren't we?
    200# on a diet and hoping for 180 by 12/1
    The UL might be my incentive/reward if I can stay below 180 for 24 months.
    Quote Originally Posted by steveinindy View Post
    As a former UL pilot myself, I'll ask you the same first question one of my friends asks someone when they call him about getting started in ultralights: "How much do you weigh?" A lot of folks in modern day America are ill-suited to fly ultralights simply because of their own mass. That may be the biggest thing (no pun intended) that makes an LSA a better option.

  6. #6
    steveinindy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    1,449
    Quote Originally Posted by malexander View Post
    Steve:
    What is a "good/no more than" weight for a U/L pilot? Is 140 to 190ish an ok/average weight?
    I believe the point at which my friend strongly starts pushing someone towards an LSA is about 180 or 190 lbs. My weight started creeping up from the 155 lbs range to which it dropped after I left the military (from a peak of 188 lbs at which I personally grounded myself from ultralights despite being in the best shape of my life) and that's one reason I started looking to get into bigger planes (in case I couldn't arrest my weight gain).

    Your mileage or opinions might vary but remember that you always want to have a little (10-15 lbs) of "wiggle room" when it comes to the MTOW. What's that old joke? "Just because you can doesn't mean you should nor does it mean you have a divine mandate".
    Unfortunately in science what you believe is irrelevant.

    "I'm an old-fashioned Southern Gentleman. Which means I can be a cast-iron son-of-a-***** when I want to be."- Robert A. Heinlein.



  7. #7

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Oklahoma City, OK
    Posts
    204
    Quote Originally Posted by steveinindy View Post
    I believe the point at which my friend strongly starts pushing someone towards an LSA is about 180 or 190 lbs. My weight started creeping up from the 155 lbs range to which it dropped after I left the military (from a peak of 188 lbs at which I personally grounded myself from ultralights despite being in the best shape of my life) and that's one reason I started looking to get into bigger planes (in case I couldn't arrest my weight gain).

    Your mileage or opinions might vary but remember that you always want to have a little (10-15 lbs) of "wiggle room" when it comes to the MTOW. What's that old joke? "Just because you can doesn't mean you should nor does it mean you have a divine mandate".

    I was just curious. I hover in the 165-170. I'd like to build something small, light, and single seat some day just to play with. At the moment, I'm getting ready to build a Rans S19.

  8. #8
    steveinindy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    1,449
    I'm getting ready to build a Rans S19.
    I've never flown in one, but I've heard good things about them. Fly safe.
    Unfortunately in science what you believe is irrelevant.

    "I'm an old-fashioned Southern Gentleman. Which means I can be a cast-iron son-of-a-***** when I want to be."- Robert A. Heinlein.



  9. #9

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Oklahoma City, OK
    Posts
    204
    Quote Originally Posted by steveinindy View Post
    I've never flown in one, but I've heard good things about them. Fly safe.

    Thanks Steve.
    I've done quite a bit of research on the S19, plus I know some guys who are building them. I'm satisfied/convinced it's a great airplane. Alos, it's kitted in Hays, Ks. just "up the road" from OKC.

  10. #10
    rosiejerryrosie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Carlisle, PA
    Posts
    392
    I need to jump in here to champion the MiniMax. A great little airplane and very much fun to fly. I owned one for years and only sold it because I wanted a two seater so I could share the fun. I weigh 200+ and never had any problems getting the 27 horse MiniMax off the ground in 300 feet or less, nor did I ever have any problems in getting at least two hours flight time out of the 5 gallon tank of mogas. (Had to switch to 100LL when unpoluted gas became unavailable here) I can't recommend the MiniMax enough to someone who wants to tool around by themselves. As far as handling - if you can handle a taildragger, the MiniMax will not be much of a challange - the only thing you need to remember is "stick full back when on the ground". Full back pressure while taxiing and on roll out is required or she will swap ends on you. She lands much like a Champ (but in much shorter distance). Love the MiniMax!! If built to specs, it is a ruged little airplane. I had a friend stall my MiniMax into the ground from about 30 feet in the air and --- no damage. After he recovered his nerves, we cranked it up and he took off again with no problems. Again - love the MiniMax - wish I had it back....
    Cheers,
    Jerry

    NC22375
    65LA out of 07N Pennsylvania

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •