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Thread: Medical special issuance vs training, fallback plans if can't solo?

  1. #21
    vibster's Avatar
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    May 2021
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    I laughed at "double secret probation", thanks for that! And thanks for the additional data points so far.

    I'll continue to research things on sport pilot and check more directly with AOPA (and with my doctor!), while keeping more limited ultralight flight in mind as a backup. My primary concern is with safety, and my secondary concern is with being in compliance with law and regulation.

    I'm not satisfied with "they won't notice unless you have an accident"; I want "they won't care even if someone e-mails the FAA enforcement department with details of your medical condition and what medications you take, because they'd agree you're safe to fly under sport pilot rules", and I'm not yet convinced which is which.

  2. #22
    Jim Heffelfinger's Avatar
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    You do know that EAA has a medical advisor right??? eaa.org is really running slowly with long load times right now. https://www.eaa.org/eaa/pilots/pilot-resources

  3. #23
    vibster's Avatar
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    Oh actually I hadn't seen that! Thanks, I'll try to talk more directly with them as well as getting advice from AOPA.

    On a more general note, my concern is that I have to plan for contingency scenarios as well as the best case scenario were nobody notices me. If I, say, rent an LSA and land too hard, damaging the landing gear and giving my passenger a minor injury, then I have to deal with an accident investigation as well as medical and property damage liability. If I rent a plane from the local airfield, the non-owners insurance I'd need to get requires me to confirm I meet the medical requirements for the relevant license for the plane I'm renting, so I worry that in such a contingency if the FAA decides that no, actually I'm in violation of regs and should have known I shouldn't be flying in their opinion, I risk having my insurance claim denied and being personally liable for the property damage and medical bills *on top* of any fines they might levy me for flying against regs.

    That's a risk I can't take. So I want to be sure I have my ducks in a row before I commit, that's all.

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