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Thread: Question about practice tests on Sportys re: cross country section

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  1. #1
    geosnooker2000's Avatar
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    Question about practice tests on Sportys re: cross country section

    I'm taking practice tests every once in a while in prep for taking the written @ Sportys free website. 60 questions with a 3 hour timer, which seems to be about 2 hours more than one should need. When a question comes up with a VFR chart vignette asking how long of a flight time will it be from Airport "A" in area 3 to Airport "B" in area 1, I have no idea HOW you are supposed to arrive at an answer. There is no way to measure distance, short of using the length of my finger from joint to joint on the scale above, and saying "weeeeeelllll.... it looks like my first and second index finger sections looks to equal about 10 nautical miles, and it looks liiiiike.... let me scroll the screen up to finish measuring.... 7.5 finger lengths. So 75 miles." Which sometimes ends up being off enough to get the wrong answer.

    Those of you who have any knowledge of testing by computer please tell me the "real deal" at the testing center has a way to determine distance, length, angles/headings, etc. This problem also crops up when they ask to figure the total landing distance under certain wind and temperature conditions on a chart that has four different segments that you are supposed to go up, hit an angled line, follow that over to a sloped line, follow that down to the next section, etc. etc.... you get the idea.

    Thanks for any responses!
    George

  2. #2
    geosnooker2000's Avatar
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    Additional question. On the Sporty's pilot test site, the practice tests have 3 possible answers on each question. Does the real test have 3 as well?
    Last edited by geosnooker2000; 07-05-2020 at 07:36 PM.

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    The vertical lines on a sectional chart (lines of longitude) have tick marks (for minutes of latitude) that are 1 nautical mile apart. For headings, maybe you can start with a VOR compass rose on the chart. For those charts where "you are supposed to go up, hit an angled line, follow that over to a sloped line, follow that down to the next section," you can just follow with your eyes and notice if you are halfway between two lines or a third down from the line, etc., that carries over to the next segment in the same proportion.
    Last edited by dougbush; 07-06-2020 at 12:02 AM.

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    When you go in to take the actual test, they give you a book that has the "figures" in it. The test says "refer to figure....", then asks the question.

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    geosnooker2000's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbalexander View Post
    When you go in to take the actual test, they give you a book that has the "figures" in it. The test says "refer to figure....", then asks the question.
    Ahhhh.... So then you can use an E6B and a straight edge?

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    Quote Originally Posted by geosnooker2000 View Post
    Ahhhh.... So then you can use an E6B and a straight edge?

    Yessir. You can even use the CX-3 computer. You can also use "T" pins or straight pins to mark points on the sectionals.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by geosnooker2000 View Post
    I'm taking practice tests every once in a while in prep for taking the written @ Sportys free website. 60 questions with a 3 hour timer, which seems to be about 2 hours more than one should need. When a question comes up with a VFR chart vignette asking how long of a flight time will it be from Airport "A" in area 3 to Airport "B" in area 1, I have no idea HOW you are supposed to arrive at an answer. There is no way to measure distance, short of using the length of my finger from joint to joint on the scale above, and saying "weeeeeelllll.... it looks like my first and second index finger sections looks to equal about 10 nautical miles, and it looks liiiiike.... let me scroll the screen up to finish measuring.... 7.5 finger lengths. So 75 miles." Which sometimes ends up being off enough to get the wrong answer.

    Those of you who have any knowledge of testing by computer please tell me the "real deal" at the testing center has a way to determine distance, length, angles/headings, etc. This problem also crops up when they ask to figure the total landing distance under certain wind and temperature conditions on a chart that has four different segments that you are supposed to go up, hit an angled line, follow that over to a sloped line, follow that down to the next section, etc. etc.... you get the idea.

    Thanks for any responses!
    George
    Welcome to performance charts. Headings & courses maybe can be approximated by stepping off parallel lines from a nearby Vortac. Sorta like its done in maritime navigation. Lot of folks are not aware that the tic marks on the longitude (n/s) lines on a sectional are constant one NM apart. Longitude (NS) converge and vary. Latitudes are totally parallel.
    Last edited by Bob Dingley; 07-17-2020 at 10:16 AM.

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