Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 23

Thread: Toxic nature of covering systems?

  1. #11
    Sam Buchanan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    KDCU
    Posts
    553
    The source of the fabric is a non-issue other than price. Unfortunately, it seems the inexpensive uncertificated 1.8 and 2.7 fabrics we used to get from Aircraft Spruce are no longer available. This leaves you with one of the uncertificated light fabrics from a major vendor such as Polyfiber:

    https://www.aircraftspruce.com/pages...ncertified.php

    You can do tests if you wish but this is a proven method with nearly 30 years of field history.
    Sam Buchanan
    The RV Journal RV-6 build log
    Fokker D.VII semi-replica build log

  2. #12
    DaleB's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    KMLE
    Posts
    596
    I took the fabric covering workshop at Oshkosh a few years ago. That was really informative, and gave me a chance to work with some of the solvent based products... I think it was the Polyfiber stuff. When (OK, if) I ever get to the point of covering my current project, I'll use the 3M Fastbond and either Stewart products or house paint to do it. I also have the Polyfiber practice kit sitting down in my basement, unused... I don't know that I'll ever use it, but no one around here is interested in it.
    Measure twice, cut once...
    scratch head, shrug, shim to fit.

    Flying an RV-12. Building a Fisher Celebrity.

  3. #13
    FlyingRon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    NC26 (Catawba, NC)
    Posts
    2,481
    The Stewart stuff is tested on Ceconite and Superlite stuff. Should work with other Dacrons as well. Your top coats aren't so important (you can use latex or Imron or Krylon for all I care), but you need to make sure you provide right stuff at the lowest level to make sure that things are adhered and properly protected.

  4. #14
    Sam Buchanan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    KDCU
    Posts
    553
    I've had a couple of opportunities to remove uncertified fabric that was bonded to an airframe with Stewart's adhesive. I no longer have any concerns about bond strengths...the glue was stronger than the fabric in most areas. The most important factor is using the proper technique for applying the water-borne adhesive, it is a different technique than applying Polyfiber's product. But once learned I find it easier to work with than Polytac.....and no deadly fumes!
    Sam Buchanan
    The RV Journal RV-6 build log
    Fokker D.VII semi-replica build log

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Buchanan View Post
    The source of the fabric is a non-issue other than price. Unfortunately, it seems the inexpensive uncertificated 1.8 and 2.7 fabrics we used to get from Aircraft Spruce are no longer available. This leaves you with one of the uncertificated light fabrics from a major vendor such as Polyfiber:

    https://www.aircraftspruce.com/pages...ncertified.php

    You can do tests if you wish but this is a proven method with nearly 30 years of field history.

    I don't doubt that it works, but I want to see it and experience working with it before pulling the trigger on ordering a kit. I'm 65, retired, and living on a social security check. So this project is a huge financial risk. I even have to put up a new building for this, if I do it. The process of obtaining a building permit is just beginning with my Village Council ( I live in an Eco-village in very rural Missouri), and there's no love lost for metallic buildings here. If I'm denied the permit.... no building = no project. So I'm just being super-cautious about the whole thing.

    By the way, I am a retired Sailmaker (like for sailboats and the 'sewn products industry' ) So to me, with my background, the fabric prices seem perfectly reasonable. Even very plain 4 ounce darcron , like you'd see on a typ. sewn-sail ultralight, would cost as much or more per running yard, and it's only 45 inches wide.

    Bob

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Buchanan View Post
    Here are details on using acrylic (latex) paint for finishing my Airdrome Aeroplanes D.VII:

    Sam,

    Did you use the Stewart's wash and etch products to prep the raw alum. that airdrome uses for the ekobond adhesive? Or do you have an alternative prep? I'm watching the Stewart videos and am not too fond of the acid etch idea.

  7. #17
    Sam Buchanan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    KDCU
    Posts
    553
    Quote Originally Posted by Soarmaster View Post
    Sam,

    Did you use the Stewart's wash and etch products to prep the raw alum. that airdrome uses for the ekobond adhesive? Or do you have an alternative prep? I'm watching the Stewart videos and am not too fond of the acid etch idea.
    Just wiped it with acetone to remove grease. Adhesion to the aluminum is primarily for holding the first piece of fabric in place until the second piece is overlaid and glued to it, then taped. The strength of the covering comes from fabric-to-fabric bonds.
    Sam Buchanan
    The RV Journal RV-6 build log
    Fokker D.VII semi-replica build log

  8. #18
    planecrazzzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Brrrmidji , Minne-SNOW-ta
    Posts
    198
    I'm 65, retired, and living on a social security check. So this project is a huge financial risk...

    Only two things you need to fly

    AIRSPEED & MONEY
    .
    Gotta Fly...

    Stitts is my choice because it will EXTINGUISH it's self when removed from the source ...fireproof

    Others will burn .
    .
    Attached Images Attached Images    

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Buchanan View Post
    Just wiped it with acetone to remove grease. Adhesion to the aluminum is primarily for holding the first piece of fabric in place until the second piece is overlaid and glued to it, then taped. The strength of the covering comes from fabric-to-fabric bonds.

    Thanks, that's a relief. I can handle an acetone wipe-down, and yes, I'm beginning to get from the various system manuals that it's the fabric to fabric bond that's really important. This makes sense -- In a sewn-sail ultralight, the fabric isn't bonded to the frame anywhere! An occasional grommet and screw to keep the sail from sliding off the end of a tube maybe, but other than that it isn't attached at all. Ditto for hang gliders.

  10. #20
    Sam Buchanan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    KDCU
    Posts
    553
    Coleman lantern fuel is also a good pre-glue agent, like acetone it flashes off without leaving a residue.
    Sam Buchanan
    The RV Journal RV-6 build log
    Fokker D.VII semi-replica build log

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •