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Thread: Corrosion X in building a metal homebuilt.

  1. #1

    Corrosion X in building a metal homebuilt.

    I am building a Windwagon/Hummelbird. The Builder's Manual for the Windwagon calls for the use of primer between pieces to be bolted or riveted. However this was written way before Corrosion X became available. Would the Corrosion X alone give the airframe the protection or should I still primer the mating surfaces.

  2. #2
    CarlOrton's Avatar
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    I'm ignorantly assuming you're using 6061-T6 to build your plane. If you want protection, you might mix up some Cortec and brush it on the mating surfaces of parts. Pretty simple, and minimal weight addition as opposed to soaking the entire innards with Corrosion X.

    Carl Orton
    Sonex #1170 / Zenith 750 Cruzer
    http://mykitlog.com/corton

  3. #3

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    I would use a good Zinc Chromate Epoxy primer.

  4. #4
    A mix of 6061 and 2024 are the alloys being used.

  5. #5

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    corrosion x has to be periodically reapplied to maintain it's effectiveness.

    I wouldn't use anything because aluminum has built in corrosion protection. Having the plane last 100 yrs would be about 80 yrs more than what I need at this point.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by vaflier View Post
    I would use a good Zinc Chromate Epoxy primer.
    Another good choice would be Zinc Phosphate. Doesn't have the carcinogen threat of Zinc Chromate. I always have a couple of spray cans on hand, and got them from ACS.

  7. #7

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    Two schools of thought on corrosion protection. One is that all faying surfaces will have moisture showing up by capillary action so you had better provide protection by priming the members before joining ( zinc chromate).
    The second is that by blocking or displacing the moisture from entering the joint, you will avoid corrosion (Corrosion X). If you live, hangar and fly in a dry environment that precludes moisture from developing, you might leave joints bare. Much depends on where you operate.

  8. #8
    Given that I live in Wisconsin I think I had better prime the surfaces. I don't forsee my renting a hangar, rather tieing down save for extended periods when I may not fly where I will bring the plane 'home'.

  9. #9

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    There are 60 yr old spam cans that have never seen a drop of primer, stored outside more than inside and they are still going strong.

  10. #10
    falcon21's Avatar
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    If you use Corrosion X don't plan on painting the airplane for the next couple of years.

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