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Thread: A bit of help regarding maintenance

  1. #11
    I understand. So, a couple of quick examples to check if I got it:


    Let's say that I buy a Zenith CH750 kit. I can build it at my garage without training, of course following every single detail of the manuals, and getting help from experienced friends or an EAA chapter if possible. I can buy a used rotax 912 or a used continental and overhaul it by myself or with help of any non certified mechanic with enough knowledge , and put it all together. After that, I request an FAA inspection and if everything goes well, I can proceed to test flights and after that regular flights. After that I can continue giving full maintenance to that aircraft during its lifetime, and If I take the 16 hours inspection training I can sign off the logbook every year and that's it. Pretty much no third party should touch that bird ever... I'm I right on that example?




    For the experimental case, lets say that I buy a set of plans of a DR109, I could build it at mi garage per the manual, take a lycoming 540 removed from a certified aircraft and overhaul it by myself or with help of someone non certified that knows the stuff, put it all together, get it inspected by the FAA and if everything is right, proceed to the 40 hours test flights, and then I would be ready to go? and after that, I can continue giving maintenance to the aircraft during its lifespan, with annual inspections signed off my me if I made the 16 hours training or by an A&P if I didn't. Of course I know that a project like this is a different animal that could take around 3500 hours of good workmanship, and a pilot with experience flying extras or pitts, but overall, from a legal and technical perspective, that would be the way to do it? right? (I'm using that example because I have here at my country a set of drawings from Todd Ashcraft for that plane, LOL)


    Thanks to all of you responding to this thread, I have some good friends and a couple of aviation authorities following along!


    Thanks again!!
    Last edited by chacalextreme; 11-26-2017 at 07:44 PM.

  2. #12
    Sam Buchanan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chacalextreme View Post


    For the experimental case, lets say that I buy a set of plans of a DR109, I could build it at mi garage per the manual, take a lycoming 540 removed from a certified aircraft and overhaul it by myself or with help of someone non certified that knows the stuff, put it all together, get it inspected by the FAA and if everything is right, proceed to the 40 hours test flights, and then I would be ready to go? and after that, I can continue giving maintenance to the aircraft during its lifespan, with annual inspections signed off my me if I made the 16 hours training or by an A&P if I didn't. Of course I know that a project like this is a different animal that could take around 3500 hours of good workmanship, and a pilot with experience flying extras or pitts, but overall, from a legal and technical perspective, that would be the way to do it? right? (I'm using that example because I have here at my country a set of drawings from Todd Ashcraft for that plane, LOL)


    Thanks to all of you responding to this thread, I have some good friends and a couple of aviation authorities following along!


    Thanks again!!
    The 16-hr training course does not apply to maintaining an aircraft with an experimental (E-AB) airworthiness certificate. Airframe and engine maintenance may be performed by anyone but the twelve-month Condition Inspection must be performed by either an A&P or the holder of a Repairman Certificate for that particular aircraft. A Repairman Certificate is customarily obtained by the original builder of the aircraft or the builder who completes the aircraft prior to final inspection by the FAA. This is the case regardless of whether or not the aircraft was constructed from plans or a manufactured kit. Obtaining this certificate does not require a training course, only a demonstration of knowledge of that aircraft during a personal interview with an FAA inspector.

    Aircraft that are registered in the ELSA and SLSA categories do require maintenance to be performed by individuals who have received specific training, the 16 hr course being one of those paths. It gets a little more complicated with the ELSA and SLSA aircraft, I suggest you obtain documents from the EAA or FAA for that information. These documents can be found with a bit of time spent on Google.
    Last edited by Sam Buchanan; 11-26-2017 at 10:44 PM.
    Sam Buchanan
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  3. #13
    Excellent Sam, thank you very much for your answers! I will do more research, but now I have a way better understanding of what to look for and what to expect to find. It's great to have the chance to post this questions here, you guys are really willing to help, that is what makes the EAA so awesome. Thanks again!

    Best regards,

    Chacalextreme

  4. #14
    DaleB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Buchanan View Post
    Aircraft that are registered in the ELSA and SLSA categories do require maintenance to be performed by individuals who have received specific training, the 16 hr course being one of those paths. It gets a little more complicated with the ELSA and SLSA aircraft, I suggest you obtain documents from the EAA or FAA for that information. These documents can be found with a bit of time spent on Google.
    I have to disagree with you on a couple of points here.

    First, no training or certification is required, at least by regulation, to perform maintenance, repairs or modifications to an E-LSA. It's an experimental. The LSR-I (16 hour course) or an A&P certificate is required only for performing the condition inspection.

    Second, the LSR-I training and certificate won't get you anywhere at all with an S-LSA. An A&P or LSR-M (120 hour course) is required for maintenance (other than preventive maintenance allowed by the manufacturer), repairs and alterations as well as inspections on S-LSA.
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  5. #15
    Sam Buchanan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaleB View Post
    I have to disagree with you on a couple of points here.

    First, no training or certification is required, at least by regulation, to perform maintenance, repairs or modifications to an E-LSA. It's an experimental. The LSR-I (16 hour course) or an A&P certificate is required only for performing the condition inspection.

    Second, the LSR-I training and certificate won't get you anywhere at all with an S-LSA. An A&P or LSR-M (120 hour course) is required for maintenance (other than preventive maintenance allowed by the manufacturer), repairs and alterations as well as inspections on S-LSA.
    We are making the same points, you went into more detail than I. Thank you for the additional info.
    Sam Buchanan
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