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Thread: Sport Pilot Academy

  1. #11

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    My eye gets a little twitchy at the advertisements for quickie shake-and-bake pilot courses, but with the EAA I wouldn't have any concerns.

    One knows it's going to be run professionally and realistically.
    The opinions and statements of this poster are largely based on facts and portray a possible version of the actual events.

  2. #12

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    One thing I meant to say as far as group learning camps or Academy's.

    I'm a self taught drummer with very few formal lessons. Myself, along with a couple of friends of mine that are also self taught, feel that were pretty decent drummers. Well, my buddies attended an intense, week long, live together with other drummers, eat, breath and live drumming Boot Camp. They both came back from that learning environment totally pumped and saying not only was it one of the best experiences of their lives but their learning curve just exploded way beyond what they thought each was capable of.

    That's one of the reasons I want in on the Academy 'experience'.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Giger View Post
    My eye gets a little twitchy at the advertisements for quickie shake-and-bake pilot courses, but with the EAA I wouldn't have any concerns.

    One knows it's going to be run professionally and realistically.
    Hi Frank, I totally agree. I generally don't like the short cut, 'you'll be a Black Belt in 2 weeks' bull, but the EAA is a pretty solid outfit.

  4. #14

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    Sport pilot comes in a few different flavors. Meaning you could go all out and get the complete sport pilot certificate or you could " piece mill " it. What do I mean by this. Sport pilot certificates can be given to those who only wish to fly single seat airplane. Who will never transition through Controlled " think ATC" airspace. Who only want to fly like a ultralight but fly something N Numbered. They only need a basic SP certificate. To fly anything farther or more one must get endorsements.

    But if you are getting a SP certificate and plan on acting like a PP. Then yes this is not enough time to teach such things. Take it in small bites and it can be done in a couple weeks. But we have those who believe a SP certificate is a certificate to commute the aviation system we have today. I do not see it this way. Its a way for those who fly, or want to fly, on the cheap " ultralight looking things" to do it legally. They go no where but to get into the air for an hour in the morning or evening. But if you want to fly more " GA " style then you do need more training. IMHO

    I said from day one, those who go after the SP certificate should take it in bites or portions. Take it in little sections and move up as you go. It keeps the Pilot "student" studying and at the airfield or school longer. Keeps CFI's busy. Its a win for all of aviation if handled this way. IMHO. To force feed one a complete SP certificate with all the bells and whistles that lets you commute the entire aviation system with all the endorsements to do so. I believe will take longer then two weeks and it should. This training should be an on going thing. Never stop learning or training. Win win for all involved in aviation. IMHO

    But lets say a person wants to be a Black belt. There is no short cut or piece mill. The training is what it is. But SP is not like this. It can be taken in small bites. Unlike most things in life, say learning to drive a semi truck or flying a Jet full of people. SP can be broken down into bites. Take it one bite at a time and the training will fly by. Excuse the pun.

  5. #15

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    Looks like the first Academy is in the books and plans are being made for 2017.

    http://www.eaa.org/en/eaa/eaa-news-a...BIRT0ifQ%3D%3D

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1600vw View Post
    Sport pilot comes in a few different flavors. Meaning you could go all out and get the complete sport pilot certificate or you could " piece mill " it. What do I mean by this. Sport pilot certificates can be given to those who only wish to fly single seat airplane. Who will never transition through Controlled " think ATC" airspace. Who only want to fly like a ultralight but fly something N Numbered. They only need a basic SP certificate. To fly anything farther or more one must get endorsements.

    But if you are getting a SP certificate and plan on acting like a PP. Then yes this is not enough time to teach such things. Take it in small bites and it can be done in a couple weeks. But we have those who believe a SP certificate is a certificate to commute the aviation system we have today. I do not see it this way. Its a way for those who fly, or want to fly, on the cheap " ultralight looking things" to do it legally. They go no where but to get into the air for an hour in the morning or evening. But if you want to fly more " GA " style then you do need more training. IMHO

    I said from day one, those who go after the SP certificate should take it in bites or portions. Take it in little sections and move up as you go. It keeps the Pilot "student" studying and at the airfield or school longer. Keeps CFI's busy. Its a win for all of aviation if handled this way. IMHO. To force feed one a complete SP certificate with all the bells and whistles that lets you commute the entire aviation system with all the endorsements to do so. I believe will take longer then two weeks and it should. This training should be an on going thing. Never stop learning or training. Win win for all involved in aviation. IMHO

    But lets say a person wants to be a Black belt. There is no short cut or piece mill. The training is what it is. But SP is not like this. It can be taken in small bites. Unlike most things in life, say learning to drive a semi truck or flying a Jet full of people. SP can be broken down into bites. Take it one bite at a time and the training will fly by. Excuse the pun.
    This isn't quite on the money.

    All Sport Pilot Certificates allow for a passenger. All Sport Pilots are restricted to daytime VFR and to aircraft that meet LSA criteria.

    The endorsements beyond that are Controlled Airspace, Seaplane, and Conventional Gear.

    The "Sets" of aircraft that initially came with the Sport Pilot license are gone, as they were completely unwieldy and impossible to enforce. It made no sense to have an endorsement for a Cub but not a FlightDesign CTLS.

    That said, as a Sport Pilot I have done it "in chunks," getting my SPL and then a tail wheel endorsement. I also did spin training and some light aerobatic training. This isn't too far from what a PPL holder might do.

    [edit]

    A PPL can be earned for single seat aircraft only as well, but I don't know anyone who has gone such a route or a CFI that is willing to instruct from the ground through all phases of training.
    The opinions and statements of this poster are largely based on facts and portray a possible version of the actual events.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Giger View Post
    This isn't quite on the money.

    All Sport Pilot Certificates allow for a passenger. All Sport Pilots are restricted to daytime VFR and to aircraft that meet LSA criteria.

    The endorsements beyond that are Controlled Airspace, Seaplane, and Conventional Gear.

    The "Sets" of aircraft that initially came with the Sport Pilot license are gone, as they were completely unwieldy and impossible to enforce. It made no sense to have an endorsement for a Cub but not a FlightDesign CTLS.

    That said, as a Sport Pilot I have done it "in chunks," getting my SPL and then a tail wheel endorsement. I also did spin training and some light aerobatic training. This isn't too far from what a PPL holder might do.

    [edit]

    A PPL can be earned for single seat aircraft only as well, but I don't know anyone who has gone such a route or a CFI that is willing to instruct from the ground through all phases of training.
    My CFI made it very clear to me. You take training in your single seat you can only then fly a single seat. You will need an endorsement to fly dual seat. I told him that is fine for I do not fly dual or two seat airplanes and when I do its with the owner of said two seat airplane so I need no endorsement for I am not PIC.

    So Frank not all SP certificates allow for passengers.

    Tony

  8. #18

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    I dont agree with Frank and Mike's doubts about a concentrated course.
    Any reaistic training in most of the U S would be concentrated and better for it. How did and do military and airline pilots train. They dont do it with a lesson every couple of weeks. If a govt person is going oversees and needs to learn a language, or a sports team train for the season, or medical school, optimimun would be concentrated.
    And for flying, the student pilot has to pass the same written test and flight test no matter how long or short their training is.
    The week long PIC inst course for instance again proves the value of concentrated training, though I am sure it can be overdone.
    Last edited by Bill Greenwood; 09-25-2016 at 09:41 AM.

  9. #19

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    You guys are "piecemealing" several regs together. Not all sport pilot training can be conducted with a single seat airplane, for obvious reasons.

    A single seat airplane can be used for the practical test, the applicant will have a "no passenger" limitation and he can only fly LSA aircraft that have a single seat. That limitation can not be removed by a CFI endorsement.


    § 61.45 Practical tests: Required aircraft and equipment.

    (f) Light-sport aircraft with a single seat. A practical test for a sport pilot certificate may be conducted in a light-sport aircraft having a single seat provided that the -

    (1) Examiner agrees to conduct the test;

    (2) Examiner is in a position to observe the operation of the aircraft and evaluate the proficiency of the applicant; and

    (3) Pilot certificate of an applicant successfully passing the test is issued a pilot certificate with a limitation “No passenger carriage and flight in a single-seat light-sport aircraft only.”

  10. #20

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    I dont agree with Frank and Mike's doubts about a concentrated course
    Me neither, only because it too general.

    There is a difference between being a customer and being a military cadet or airline new hire. The customer can take his business elsewhere if he feels he is not getting a good product. A military cadet or new hire gets washed out of the program.

    If one takes a concentrated course, they have to be motivated, prepare and work hard to make it work. Same is true for 2 lessons per week or 2 lessons per month.
    Last edited by martymayes; 09-25-2016 at 11:52 AM. Reason: HTML oopsie

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