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Thread: Stick shaker

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by raytoews View Post
    Thatis very cool.

    Slip it under your rubber grip so it buzzz's right into your hand.
    That will be the next one I do.
    No need for electronics, a wing stalls at 15 degrees, weight just changes the speed at which it stalls.
    When the buzzzer goes off you are at fifteen degrees, it startles you,,,, you push and don't die.
    KISS works.
    Feelings about bureaucrats aside, I agree that you don't need any fancy electronics for a flapless plane, just wire the shaker and light to the contact switch on the vane or paddle AOA sensor, power it with a 9V battery, maybe add a "push to test" button to check the battery during your preflight, but how would you adjust for flaps up/down when a plane does have flaps?
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  2. #12
    Have you looked at the MCAS on the 737 MAX or the rudder pedal shaker on the F-4J? The tailhook flyers of the Navy fly AOA regularly for carrier landing where they can look out of the cockpit and see that the little vane is still there and moving correctly.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2ndsegment View Post
    Have you looked at the MCAS on the 737 MAX or the rudder pedal shaker on the F-4J? The tailhook flyers of the Navy fly AOA regularly for carrier landing where they can look out of the cockpit and see that the little vane is still there and moving correctly.
    One can actually see the vane from the cockpit?

    So are you saying that the stall warning is shaking rudder pedals?

    Thanks, Ron

  4. #14
    Just to be more public- Stalls

    Stalls are primarily a factor of angle of attack. The F-4 will provide several stall warning cues that are discussed in the following paragraphs. The aircraft comes equipped with a rudder pedal shaker that activates at a fixed threshold and warns the pilot before approaching stall angle of attack. Tthe angle of attack at which the pedal shaker is activated is dependent on aircraft type as listed below.class "wikitable" pedal shaker activation - aircraft angle of attack - early f-4b aircraft 22.3 - late f-4b and f-4n aircraft 21.3
    Pedal shaker activation – Angle of Attack
    Early F-4B aircraft 22.3 units
    Late F-4B and F-4N aircraft 21.3 units

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by 2ndsegment View Post
    Just to be more public- Stalls

    Stalls are primarily a factor of angle of attack. The F-4 will provide several stall warning cues that are discussed in the following paragraphs. The aircraft comes equipped with a rudder pedal shaker that activates at a fixed threshold and warns the pilot before approaching stall angle of attack. Tthe angle of attack at which the pedal shaker is activated is dependent on aircraft type as listed below.class "wikitable" pedal shaker activation - aircraft angle of attack - early f-4b aircraft 22.3 - late f-4b and f-4n aircraft 21.3
    Pedal shaker activation – Angle of Attack
    Early F-4B aircraft 22.3 units
    Late F-4B and F-4N aircraft 21.3 units
    and from PRUNE
    For instance, in the Harrier, if more than a 10°angle of sideslip exists, the aircraft can enter into an uncommanded roll,which can be unrecoverable. To prevent this hazard, the Harrier uses aweathervane-type probe extending into the airflow in front of the cockpitwhich measures angle of sideslip. The weathervane-type probe aligns withthe relative wind, allowing the aircraft to determine angle of sideslip bymeasuring the difference between the rotational position of theweathervane-type probe and the normal alignment of the body of theaircraft with the airflow. In the Harrier, if the angle of sideslipbecomes excessive, a warning is provided to the pilot by a pedal shakerwhich shakes the rudder pedals. The pilot can also visually monitor theangle of sideslip by observing the amount of angular offset of theweathervane probe. However, the Harrier's weathervane probe is fixed inplace even when the Harrier is in normal wing borne flight. This increasesthe drag of the Harrier at higher speeds.

  6. #16

  7. #17
    then on a carrier instead of an airfield.

    https://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=video+of+aoa+vane+in+carrier+landing&doci d=608049076768344902&mid=2D05E681405BB4DAADC92D05E 681405BB4DAADC9&view=detail&FORM=VIRE

    Last edited by 2ndsegment; 04-16-2020 at 10:33 AM. Reason: did not seem to be active

  8. #18
    A sketch and a picture the AOA vane is about where the pilot is looking. I am stll looking for a picture of it as seen from the cockpit I saw a long time ago. In the first video above the little brown focus grabber went down to about where it is on the FA-18 at one time in the video.
    Name:  A4_Diagram.jpg
Views: 105
Size:  93.6 KB Name:  A-4C Nose.jpg
Views: 105
Size:  26.8 KB

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