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Thread: Rebuilding a certified engine??

  1. #11
    Mike Switzer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1600vw View Post
    This is why once you install a certified engine on something not certified it can not go back on a certified airplane, not without a complete tear down and inspection.

    Tony
    Incorrect. As long as any maintenance is in compliance with FAA requirements for that engine, and all engine maintenance is logged in the engine logbook & signed off by an A&P it is still considered to be a legal, certified engine.

  2. #12

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    What he said. An FAA certificated and rated individual must sign all of the paperwork for the engine to retain its certificated status. You as an amateur builder can not sign the engine off if you want it to remain certificated. That said, you can sign the condition inspection for the airframe as you know.

    Engines are quick and easy to annual. They really are. So why cheap out and buy yourself future trouble?

    As for who can sign off the overhaul, I have to confess that all of the mechanics that I work with are A&P's with IA's. So it might require an IA. But there are lots of those guys are around and most are good to have a beer with too. I like having another set of eyes look at my work and another brain to bounce ideas off of and solicit advice from. They teach me stuff and I teach them stuff. Its good to have friends.

    Best of luck,

    Wes
    N78PS

  3. #13
    Mike Switzer's Avatar
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    Plus, if the engine is kept "legal" it can be sold for quite a bit of $$ separately from the airframe if you ever want to.

  4. #14

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    Basically, An A/P can do a major overhaul of a piston engine as long as it does not have an integral supercharger. Then you would need an I/A to return the engine to service. Wes, I would love for you to buy me a beer some time. I would enjoy the conversation.

    Dave
    AP/IA
    NC2329

  5. #15

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    I won't debate the wisdom of having an A&P look at the engine annually or at longevity points along the way - that's self evident.

    The issue comes up most often at TBO's versus "as needed."

    Or the dreaded "I don't work on experimentals" attitude. There are A&P's that are willing to look at a certified engine on an experimental but refuse to put their signature anywhere near them.

    I'm lucky - our local A&P digs aircraft of all sorts!

    [edit]

    Personally, I'd rebuild my aircraft engine in the same way I'd rebuild my car's engine - with a checkbook. I have no qualms about rebuilding a carburetor, though, since I'm putting a VW engine on my plane!
    Last edited by Frank Giger; 06-11-2014 at 06:43 PM.
    The opinions and statements of this poster are largely based on facts and portray a possible version of the actual events.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Chips View Post
    Used to be a AP could not split the case only an AI, that no longer true?
    Never was true.

  7. #17

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    I think you are mistaken but it's no matter.
    Never is a long time, how far back you going?
    I rebuilt a VO360A1B in 1979, did all the work under his supervision and he signed it off, at that time I am all most certain I was told by the AI that a AP cannot split the case, but again, no matter at this point.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Chips View Post
    I think you are mistaken but it's no matter.
    Never is a long time, how far back you going?
    I rebuilt a VO360A1B in 1979, did all the work under his supervision and he signed it off, at that time I am all most certain I was told by the AI that a AP cannot split the case, but again, no matter at this point.
    According to Part 43, Appendix A, the following tasks are considered "major repairs" and therefore can not be returned to service by an A&P:

    (i) Separation or disassembly of a crankcase or crankshaft of a reciprocating engine equipped with an integral supercharger.

    (ii) Separation or disassembly of a crankcase or crankshaft of a reciprocating engine equipped with other than spur-type propeller reduction gearing

    Integral superchargers and planetary reductions are radial engine components not applicable to the common opposed engines. There is nothing to prohibit an A&P from splitting the case on a direct drive opposed engine, never has been.

    The above excerpt of Part 43, Appendix D was first published in 1964 and was in effect in 1979, as it is today.

  9. #19

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    Well maybe.. they must have done it prior, to be legal in doing it now.
    65.83 Recent experience requirements.

    A certificated mechanic may not exercise the privileges of his certificate and rating unless, within the preceding 24 months—
    (a) The Administrator has found that he is able to do that work; or
    (b) He has, for at least 6 months—
    (1) Served as a mechanic under his certificate and rating;
    (2) Technically supervised other mechanics;
    (3) Supervised, in an executive capacity, the maintenance or alteration of aircraft; or
    (4) Been engaged in any combination of paragraph (b) (1), (2), or (3) of this section.


    Last edited by Tom Downey; 06-12-2014 at 01:43 PM.

  10. #20

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    When any certified engine has been removed from an EXP aircraft and placed in service on a certified aircraft, it must have an airworthy inspection by any A&P and the appropriate entries made in the aircraft maintenance records. All modifications must be properly documented on a STC or field approval. It matters not, who preformed maintenance prior to this inspection, the person returning it to service buys off all prior sins. they are responsible for the airworthy condition of the engine.

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