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Thread: Real Cost to build 60'x60' hangar

  1. #11
    steve's Avatar
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    We 3 partners entertained assembling the structure (we build airplanes, right?) but the local city required a licensed contractor and we all had day jobs and winter was close and another hangar was just completed and that builder offered us a sweet deal cause the crane and crew were already on site, etc. So we did the smart thing and let the pros assemble the hangar.
    An important item I listed above was the asphalt pad. We built on the last lot at the end of a row so we had to bear the cost of the pad in front of the hangar. The city inspector also stated the city's position, "No pad - no occupancy certificate." Your local rules may be different.

  2. #12

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    I will note that since you are in Tennessee, a bifold door is nice but there are less expensive options. The bifold door is best when you get freezing temps and snow, but in milder climates where the ground does not heave in the winter and the ice does not block the bottom of the door from moving, a side rolling door can be a less expensive choice. The bifold door is 30% of the cost of the building kit.

    On the topic of heated floors, I have installed some radiant heat in my house. So I can tell you that to have done that in my hangar I would have had to add the cost of over 2000' of cross linked PEX (1/2") plus manifolds, pumps, and a boiler, and the cost of installation. Plus the floor pour would have required more expensive equipment because with the PEX tubing tied to the reinforcing mesh, you can not drive the concrete truck into the hanger to jusr deliver via the truck's chute. So figure on another $3K+ or so added to the cost of the hangar. Plus you can not simply turn the floor heat on and off. It takes a couple of days to warm up, so you have to turn it on in say December and pay the expense of running it through say March. Unless you are going to spend at least 40 hours a week in your hangar, it is very very hard to justify. But that said, if I were spending someone else's $$, I would certainly suggest doing it. Heated floors are great and if you have a dog it will be one happy puppy all winter.

    Best of luck,

    Wes
    N78PS

  3. #13
    prasmussen's Avatar
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    Was looking to put up a pole barn. Just a metal tent with sliding barn doors, right? All looked good until we got to the "site-prep" charges which, in the location I wanted to put the hangar, doubled the cost. And that was certainly not an epoxied, heated floor!

    If you have land, a thought that has worked here is to let someone else build a hangar on your strip with the agreement that, after a certain number of years, it belongs to you. It's all in the details, of course, but written right, it is a win-win.

    Best of luck
    The journey is the reward.

  4. #14

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    I haven't heard any mention of actual ownership regarding a hanger. Many airports that are connected with local govts. have lots of rules, and even if you comply with all the building requirements you may not actually own the building after 10 or 20 years. You are first in line to rent your hanger from the airport "authority" per the agreement, read the fine print before you start signing contracts.

    Joe

  5. #15
    steveinindy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe LaMantia View Post
    I haven't heard any mention of actual ownership regarding a hanger. Many airports that are connected with local govts. have lots of rules, and even if you comply with all the building requirements you may not actually own the building after 10 or 20 years. You are first in line to rent your hanger from the airport "authority" per the agreement, read the fine print before you start signing contracts.

    Joe
    This would be why if it weren't so expensive to put a decent runway onto private property, I would definitely do that.
    Unfortunately in science what you believe is irrelevant.

    "I'm an old-fashioned Southern Gentleman. Which means I can be a cast-iron son-of-a-***** when I want to be."- Robert A. Heinlein.



  6. #16

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    Steve,

    Yep, the "solution" to this problem is knowing what the winning lottery number will be before it's drawn!

    Joe

  7. #17
    steveinindy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe LaMantia View Post
    Steve,

    Yep, the "solution" to this problem is knowing what the winning lottery number will be before it's drawn!

    Joe
    Yup. That it is. Of course, if I did hit the lottery, you all would probably banish me from the Forums because of the 10,000 foot x 100 foot strip of concrete with a Category III ILS on my estate. Then again, you would all be welcome to come see the collect of airplanes kept there so it might balance out. LOL
    Unfortunately in science what you believe is irrelevant.

    "I'm an old-fashioned Southern Gentleman. Which means I can be a cast-iron son-of-a-***** when I want to be."- Robert A. Heinlein.



  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe LaMantia View Post
    I haven't heard any mention of actual ownership regarding a hanger.
    Simply observed - If it were cheap to build and own 60 x 60 hangars on municipal airports, EVERYBODY would be doing it.

  9. #19

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    The block is that too many folks want instant gratification for low $$. Building a hangar on your local airport requires patience and persistence and some negotiating skills in addition to a few $$. A friend built a block of condo hangars at the local municipal airport and his biggest personal characteristic is persistence. So this challenge is like everything else in aviation. If you really want to do it, you can. But there are 1000 reasons to spend your time on something else.

    Yoda - Do or do not...

    Best of luck,

    Wes
    N78PS
    Hangar builder

  10. #20
    flyboycpa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Green Goggles View Post
    I don't know what winters in Tennesse are like, but here in Oklahoma we need heat, and in my opinion, a heated floor is THE way to go.


    Obviously, the heated floor adds cost and complexity to the construction, but if you are considering it, I would go for it.
    After being in that hangar daily, through a few very cold winters, I am total believer.



    Is your hangar for daily work? Or just a storage place to park an aircraft?
    My hangar is only for the storage of my plane. The hangar I'm currently in doesn't have a heated floor and I've been in it for 7 years. I'm sure it would be nice, but not an absolute necessity here.

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