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Thread: Looking for Ideas - Cutting Lexan Disks

  1. #21

    Join Date
    Oct 2011
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    38
    I've been using a CNC router for a few years for my Hatz build. I have cut plexiglass, wood and now aluminum. Depending on the max size you want to cut, a small 12"x24" CNC router will cost less than $500. It's my most versatile tool. Some projects:

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    Wood nose pieces for the wings.

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    Elevator trim handle cut from 1/8" aluminum

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    Elevator trim built from aluminum

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    Face plate for elevator trim cut from plexiglass.

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    Throttle quadrant made from aluminum.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Alabama
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    My WebFu is weak, sir, so if you could tell me which machine you got I'd be much obliged.
    The opinions and statements of this poster are largely based on facts and portray a possible version of the actual events.

  3. #23

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    Oct 2011
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    I bought mine a few years ago from Amazon. It's not listed anymore. There are plenty of other CNC routers listed on Amazon.

    https://www.amazon.com/s?k=3040+cnc+...f=nb_sb_noss_1

    You will need some computer skills as the parts are all designed on a computer.

  4. #24

    Join Date
    May 2021
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    Nikiski, Alaska
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    Quote Originally Posted by rwanttaja View Post
    I'm trying to come up with a way to easily cut out disks of Lexan to a given diameter.

    A fly cutter would be ideal...but I don't want the center hole that a fly cutter normally produces. I want to end up with an unblemished disk of clear plastic. This isn't a standard size, so a hole saw won't work. And since the disks are to fit existing holders, a reasonable amount of precision is needed.

    The only thing that comes to mind is to clamp down the plastic and use the fly cutter without the pilot drill. Any other ideas?

    Ron Wanttaja
    Why cut. Lexan has a low temp threshold. Make a correct diameter ring slightly over size and heat metal ring with torch to melt the disc. ring will need a handle, good idea to use a small diameter handle that can be chucked in a drill press. Not rotating but use the handles to press the heated "branding iron" down with equal force.

    Used to work with plastics, when we worked with lexan, 150 deg F for 8-hours to remove excess moisture then we would very quickly bend or put on vacuum table.

    Best regards,
    Mike Bauer

  5. #25
    vondeliusc's Avatar
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    Nov 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by rwanttaja View Post
    I'm trying to come up with a way to easily cut out disks of Lexan to a given diameter.

    Ron Wanttaja
    CNC: I do this all the time.
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    My 6040 (~18"x24") was about $1000 and is a brilliant tool for SO many things.
    -Christian von Delius

  6. #26

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    Oct 2011
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    CNC routers and 3D printers work for more than building parts. If you look closely at my elevator trim picture in my post above, the ball screw mechanism is a part from a 3D printer.

  7. #27

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    So what was the ultimate solution?
    The opinions and statements of this poster are largely based on facts and portray a possible version of the actual events.

  8. #28
    rwanttaja's Avatar
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    Jul 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Giger View Post
    So what was the ultimate solution?
    I bought the 20-piece set on Amazon for $15. Now I have to come up with something to do with the remaining 17. Could make some really ugly goggles, I suppose.

    Really appreciate the range of suggestions, here. Intrigued with the concept of using a CNC router. If I could come up with MORE things to use it for, I might buy one.

    Ron Wanttaja

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