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Thread: How to transport auto-gas to airport?

  1. #1
    bwilson4web's Avatar
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    How to transport auto-gas to airport?

    Hi,

    I had not really considered hauling high-octane, auto-gas to the airport because the airplane 15 gallon tank meant easily three or more, 5 gallon containers. Then there is the contamination risks from transporting fuel and empty containers all over the place with potential spillage. Worse, to carry these cans in the trunk and/or in the hatchback, well I've smelled enough gas not to want to repeat that experiment. Then someone suggested using a modified trailer, like the one I used to carry my plane to Huntsville:
    • What sort of 'safety' requirements are needed to transport gasoline on a private trailer?
    • How do FOBs typically handle this? (I would buy it from the FBO if they offered it.)
    • Are there vehicle insurance policy requirements?
    • How are gas vs. aviation taxes handled?
    I was resigned to having to use 100LL but if no-lead, high octane, gas can be used, I might go ahead and plan for an O{2} sensor. But I was not going to use an O{2} sensor if I had to use 100LL since it would 'foul' pretty quickly.

    Thanks,
    Bob Wilson

  2. #2
    rosiejerryrosie's Avatar
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    Best to check with your local (state) transportation folks as the requirements in each state may vary. Here in PA for instance, to transport more then 50 gallons, a special permit is required.
    Cheers,
    Jerry

    NC22375
    65LA out of 07N Pennsylvania

  3. #3

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    Re the O2 sensor, sooner or later you'll be on a cross country and will fill up with 100LL... then what?

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by bwilson4web View Post
    Hi,

    I had not really considered hauling high-octane, auto-gas to the airport because the airplane 15 gallon tank meant easily three or more, 5 gallon containers.
    Did you mean "15 gallon TANK," or "TANKS"? If singular, you'll never need to carry more than 15 gallons. If you operate with normal reserves, 10 gallons will probably be sufficient, normally.

    My Fly Baby has a 15-gallon tank, and I use two 2.5-gallon cans. I typically just fly an hour, so five gallons is usually sufficient. The two small cans fit nicely into one of those plastic "milk crates" they sell at department stores, and that keeps them from falling over in the trunk of my car when I transport them. Two milk crates would give you ten gallons, and you'd never have to lift more than ~16 pounds. I put a large leaf bag into the milk crate as a liner in case there's spilled gas on the outside of the cans.

    Typically, I keep the cans and crate at the airport and drive to the gas station when I need to. If I'm planning a longer trip, I'll take the cans home with me after the previous flight and get gas on the way to the airport. When I get back, I'll load that five gallons, then go get some more. Or I'll just top off with 100LL on my next trip out.

    A couple of things to keep in mind: Use a "Mr Funnel" or similar filtration system. Don't store gas in your hangar (usually against the airport rules). Test each load for ethanol. And, if you're running a Lycoming or Continental, run a load of 100LL through every ~4th fill so the engine gets its occasional dose of lead.

    Ron Wanttaja

  5. #5

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    Hey Bob,
    I posted some more stuff on your aircraft carrier thread.

    Marshall Alexander

  6. #6
    Bugs66's Avatar
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    Here is what I put together from ex 18 wheeler 100 gal tank and Harbor Freight trailer. 119 gal and under is legal and not considered hazmat in my area. This self contained fueler paid for itself after 3 fillups or so. I plan to use for many years. And yes, it has a static ground line.

    fueler.jpg
    Bugs
    EAA 459462
    www.supercubproject.com

  7. #7
    steveinindy's Avatar
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    What sort of 'safety' requirements are needed to transport gasoline on a private trailer?
    If you're not going for the trailer idea that was previously suggested, which I think is really awesome, I would highly suggest you look for a heavy duty metal gas can with a self-closing (such as a spring loaded) lid. My father had a steel one he used for hauling gas for our riding lawnmower. It was about 10 or 15 gallons and something like that would be just about perfect for what you're talking about. It would stand up a lot better if your vehicle were to be rear-ended while on the way to the airport. When I was about 10 or so, my dad actually backed over the can which I left sitting behind his truck. Didn't even dent it nor spill a drop.

  8. #8

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    You can pump fuel from the car fuel tank with a small electric automotive fuel pump and a hose. I haven't tried this, but have seen this done.
    I use two 2.5 gallon gas cans, like Ron said.

  9. #9
    bwilson4web's Avatar
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    This is excellent and addresses a future, not current, requirement. Of course there will be some 'negotiation' with the FBO but that is at least a year away.

    Edison once said words to the effect that 99% of all ideas or experiments don't work. So he was asked how was he so successful as an inventer, he said 'Have lots of ideas.' A forum like this is a reasonable place to find potentially useful ideas so instead of having to figure everything out from scratch, borrow inspiration and build to suit your requirements. <GRINS>

    Bob Wilson

  10. #10
    Joe Delene's Avatar
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    I'd just mix in whatever you can with your visits to the airport, 15-20 gallons at a time with 5-6 gal containers. You should really transport in a pickup or something with 'open air'. If you must used an enclosed vehicle I'd leave the windows down for the short trip to the airport. Strong fumes in an enclosed area can lead to disaster. I have an inexpensive ethanol tester, to double check the station.

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