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Thread: Solo Flying Minimum Age?

  1. #11
    Jim Clark's Avatar
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    Sorry, I confused myself and threw in commercial time on an instrument question. Regs state: Accumulate and log a specified amount of training and experience; the following are part of the airplane single-engine land class rating requirements:If training under Part 61, at least 250 hours of piloting time including 20 hours of training with an instructor and 10 hours of solo flight, and other requirements including several "cross-country" flights, i.e. more than 50 nautical miles (93*km) from the departure airport (which include Day VFR and Night VFR 100*nmi (190*km) between points, with a time of at least 2hrs; also one cross country which is done solo 250*nmi (460*km) one way, 300*nmi (560*km) total distance with landings at 3 airports) and both solo and instructor-accompanied night flightsIf training under Part 141, at least 190 hours of training time including 55 hours with an instructor and 10 hours of solo flight, and other requirements including several cross-country, solo, and night flights
    Jim Clark, Chairman National Biplane Fly In, www.nationalbiplaneflyin.com. Currently flying: 1929 Waco CSO, 1939 Waco EGC-8, 1946 Piper J-3, 1955 Piper PA22/20, 1956 Beech G35, 1984 Beech A36 & 2001 Vans RV9.
    You love a lot of things if you live around them, but there isn't any woman and there isn't any horse, nor any before nor any after, that is as lovely as a great airplane, and men who love them are faithful to them even though they leave them for others.
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  2. #12

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    Guys, thanx. I appreciate all your help, this will aid me immensly in reaching my goals.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Clark View Post
    Sorry, I confused myself and threw in commercial time on an instrument question. Regs state: Accumulate and log a specified amount of training and experience; the following are part of the airplane single-engine land class rating requirements:If training under Part 61, at least 250 hours of piloting time including 20 hours of training with an instructor and 10 hours of solo flight, and other requirements including several "cross-country" flights, i.e. more than 50 nautical miles (93*km) from the departure airport (which include Day VFR and Night VFR 100*nmi (190*km) between points, with a time of at least 2hrs; also one cross country which is done solo 250*nmi (460*km) one way, 300*nmi (560*km) total distance with landings at 3 airports) and both solo and instructor-accompanied night flightsIf training under Part 141, at least 190 hours of training time including 55 hours with an instructor and 10 hours of solo flight, and other requirements including several cross-country, solo, and night flights
    Rangerofthewest: you may as well get used to this mow if you want to be in aviation. This is what flight instructors and pilots love to do - discuss the regulations and their meaning all of the time.

    Ok, for private pilot, paragraph 61.109 basically says that you need 40 hours of flight time, with 20 hours of training by an authorized instructor, 10 hours of solo, and ten hours of time that has never been defined. This includes 3 hours of cross-country training, 3 hours of night flying training, 100 nautical mile night flight training, 10 night takeoffs and landings to a full stop, 3 hours of instrument training, including recovery from unusual attitudes, and training in areas covered by 14CFR61.107(b)(1). The solo time must include a cross-country flight of at least 150NM, with landings at 3 airports and one leg at least 50nm distance. Also, the solo requires three takeoffs and landings at a towered airport.

    Note that all of this is "at least". No good instructor will turn you loose for your practical test unless you're ready.
    Last edited by Bob Meder; 12-17-2011 at 04:03 PM.
    Anxiety is nature's way of telling you that you've already goofed up.

  4. #14
    Sonex1517's Avatar
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    rangerofthewest - don't ever let go of that dream, and don't let ANYTHING keep you from pursuing it.

    You cannot solo at 14, but there are so many ways to become involved in aviation, learn, and apply the knowledge to being a safe and competent pilot sooner than you would imagine. The EAA Young Eagles program is one way, but even signing up for a ground school class will help you learn about the steps involved and the knowledge you need. The Sporty's ground school online is one great tool for you.

    If you have the desire to do this, and are willing to work hard to get there, you can and will achieve your goal.
    Robbie Culver
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  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by MickYoumans View Post
    Even though you can't be a student pilot and solo until you are 16, there is nothing wrong with flying in the right seat and learning everything you can in the mean time.
    Ummm, I am a little confused. He can get dual in the left seat (or front in the case of my granddaughter flying a Citabria). How else would you solo at 16?

  6. #16

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    Ranger, if there are any glider operations or schools in your area ,please go see them. Take a parent if you can.
    You can certainly take glider lessons at 13 and solo a glider at 14. It is not very hard, is a lot of fun, pretty safe, and a good basis to become a powered pilot later. The glider book learning and written test is much less than a powered license test.
    I have to give a small warning, some glider operations focus more on doing rides than they do on giving instructions. Frankly, some of them aren't as friendly or as welcoming as they should be. But, so what don't let them discourage you. Just keep going.
    While you can certainly take private lessons in a power plane at 13, you can't solo it for 3 more years. I'd do the glider first, then do the power thing after you are 15.
    Good luck, and don't let anyone tell you that 16 is too young to be a pilot; I know a man who flew a number of airplanes solo on his 16th birthday, including T-6 and P-51.

  7. #17
    wotai's Avatar
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    I also started my flight training at the age of 15. Completed all the requirements I could and at 16, touched up my training and at 17 I got my PPL.
    It's great to start young.
    Pilot training and career information - How To Become A Pilot

  8. #18
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    Goggles

    i think flying is maybe the most amazing thing i ever did,

    it's a feeling i can't explain, i think it's as free as i could ever feel


    anyway, if you haven't been flying yet, i think it's a good time for you



    cheers !!


    sam
    -------------------------------
    Comedy has to be based on truth. You take the truth and you put a little curlicue at the end.
    Sid Caesar


    penthouse in Israel

  9. #19

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    If you have a passion for aviation and want to fly solo, look into learning to fly an ultralight airplane. No minimum age requirement to fly an ultralight. Wish they'd been around when I soloed at 16 and got my license when I turned 17. I would have gone that route first.

  10. #20
    rosiejerryrosie's Avatar
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    Buzz, Not great advice for a youngster. For starters, there are no ultralight instructors anymore. The waiver for two place instructional ultralight vehicles disappeared with the advent of Light Sport Aircraft. In order to get instruction these days, it would have to be done in an LSA aircraft, and if the young man is to fly ultralights, it should be done in an "ultralight like" aircraft. I would not recommend to anyone that they just jump into an ultralight and fly just because no 'license' is required and not minimum age is published. There is no reason he should not begin instruction and gain experience while waiting until he is old enough to solo legally. A lot of flying can take place with an instructor in the right seat. I went through a very similar situation while waiting for Oklahoma City to approve my medical. I had completed all the requirements (except solo) for a checkride before I did my first solo. After the medical was approved, and I was allowed to legally solo, it was a piece of cake to complete the other requirements for certification. There are very few legal and safe shortcuts....
    Cheers,
    Jerry

    NC22375
    65LA out of 07N Pennsylvania

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