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Thread: Video: I've just started a new series on the Garmin avionics in my Legacy

  1. #1

    Video: I've just started a new series on the Garmin avionics in my Legacy

    I'm still amazed by how much workload these newer integrated avionics help remove. The key is knowing how to use them.

    If you're interested, the series is here. Hope you enjoy:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tQUA...fxs-c8atau8RK3

    Would love feedback,
    Thanks folks,
    Kurt

  2. #2
    I'm pleased to see your orientation to an exact build of a panel. My background is with aircraft performance and operational and mission analysis. My first acquaintance with an aircraft panel was the navigator's version in a USAF B-52 in 1968 and the kinds of calculations and pre-comps for the Astrotracker and LORAN-A,C. About the same time I met something new, a H.U.D. As a pilot my hands on was with the Flight Manual or -1for a KC-135 and for an A-4 Skyhawk and the various graphs and charts necessary to update from toss bombing to dive toss and dive delivery with an inertial system and at first a gyro-computing gun sight like in the F-100. This was for the Marine corps version and later an Israeli version as well as the Harrier.

    So how do I get to the basic pilot panel? The McDonnell Aircraft Corporation merged with Douglas Aircraft Company in 1968/69 and I was asked to coordinate with the Missile and Space Division of both companys to get aircraft to act correctly in a computer program used on the FX Contract Definition called Air Battle Simulation-II. A big jump from looking at Syllabi for B-58 and FB-111 WSO and DSO Combat Crew Training System integration with navigator and Bomb Navigator procedures trainers for the B-52. After getting the Navy happy with work done on a Missile program called QUICKTURN I was allowed to bring back the work I had reviewed with the Navy Fighter Weapon School incidental to attending "Top Gun" class 70-1. At McDonnell I got to see the full motion simulators they were building for the C-5 and the A-7 and why they were getting out of that business to only doing Engineering Development simulation with crew stations in spherical projection balls and a 5-DOF on a boom weapon delivery simulator. There one ball had round gauges and one ball had novel CRT displays. (1970). And now I see the Legacy form of flat panel for GA.

  3. #3
    How do you set up the wind? My own experience was with a Boeing publication, "Enroute Winds Aloft". Later I would consult the days transcripts at the Douglas Aircraft flight Office. Without a Doppler, the GPS has a total route responsibility once the airport report is cleared. This is your briefing. Dismiss my comments as obsolete and continue.

  4. #4
    I just woke up looking at the second one again. You are punching buttons where in my mind you were setting up as in a simulation making touch actions! ��

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by 2ndsegment View Post
    I just woke up looking at the second one again. You are punching buttons where in my mind you were setting up as in a simulation making touch actions! ��
    Not sure I understand your comment, do you mean the setup I do with the autopilot before departing?

    Best!
    Kurt

  6. #6
    Yes, I see the buttons are not just in a box around the display as once was used and are actual buttons that push and not just images on active areas of a multipurpose display. It's an issue with me because of the size of the display. My computer that had an issue with a touch screen had a 17 inch display. Years ago I had issues with an "altitude" derived from a pressure sensor without integration with GPS. Aren't I the frazzle?

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