Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 65

Thread: A question about assessing a ramp queen for purchase (disassembly of the wings...)

  1. #11

    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    1,116
    Restoring an airplane is mostly labor. If you do all the work with no concern for your time the cost of parts is minimal. Even an overhaul or partial engine repair can be done with a mechanic assisting. My first rebuild was a 1946 Chief at age 21.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    2,557
    One listed for sale for $21,500 and this is a flying airplane, all the parts there together and radios and panel that work, engine that runs and can take you for a demo flight. But hey, mabye you can raise the other one from the dead if that is really what you want to spend your time on.
    And just a guess but I think most a&ps are going to prefer to annual a flying airplane, rather than a nest of mice, birds etc.
    Last edited by Bill Greenwood; 02-08-2020 at 10:53 PM.

  3. #13
    geosnooker2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    West Tennessee
    Posts
    35
    Quote Originally Posted by Dana View Post
    If it takes $6000 to get it back in flying shape, great, but it could also take $30K to put it back into shape, then what?
    I would definitely want to get a pre-buy inspection done by an A&P not currently associated with the plane. I mean, all issues besides the main spar bolt holes, since those are what I'm suggesting is a very expensive inspection (as I said, up to $3000 just to remove the wings).

  4. #14
    Airmutt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    NW. Atlanta GA
    Posts
    249
    I use understand your concern about the wing AD but I think you need to get some basic info. Some of which impacts the spar AD.........
    What year is this airframe?
    What is the AFTT?
    When was is last flown?
    Why was it parked?
    Are all the log available?
    Do understand and have a list of all the outstanding service bulletins and ADs that need to be incorporated?
    When was the engine last majored?
    Have you borescoped the cylinders?
    What do the engine logs indicate or tell you?
    Do you have an A&P in hand who is willing to work with you?
    Do you have the necessary shop space?
    Do you have the necessary tooling on hand?
    Do you really have the skills to pull this off?
    Do you have the time to invest to get this project completed?
    Do you realize that almost every system on this plane will need to be gone through and most likely require a rebuild or replacement?
    Have you and or your A&P inspected the airframe for corrosion?
    Do you really have a handle on the cost of replacement parts in today’s market?
    Have you done a balance sheet for the project?
    Do you have the financial resources?
    Are you married, and if yes, is she OK with what you’re about to undertake?

    The above is just a short list. Yes any airplane can be brought back from the dead given enough time, money and determination. It’s tough to separate the emotion & passion from reality. Not trying to rain on your parade but just want you to fully understand the complexity of the task you are contemplating.
    Dave Shaw
    EAA 67180 Lifetime
    Learn to Build, Build to Fly, Fly for Fun

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    656
    Sounds to me like IF the above excellent beginner checklist is answered and acceptable to you and IF it indeed is a $1000 project starter abandoned plane then have a ball.

    I read enough 'money pit' stories from pilot-owners of used planes bought in flying condition to be too timid to buy one that doesn't even start there.
    "Don't believe everything you see or read on the internet" - Abraham Lincoln

  6. #16
    rwanttaja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    2,455
    Quote Originally Posted by CHICAGORANDY View Post
    Sounds to me like IF the above excellent beginner checklist is answered and acceptable to you and IF it indeed is a $1000 project starter abandoned plane then have a ball.

    I read enough 'money pit' stories from pilot-owners of used planes bought in flying condition to be too timid to buy one that doesn't even start there.
    I don't disagree with you, but.... I think the OP's estimate of $6,000 to get a $1,000 airplane flying is WAY optimistic. In all likelihood, after the airplane is restored, just the first annual inspection will probably run about half that.

    On the other hand, $1,000 is basically nothing in aviation. If the OP determines the plane cannot be economically brought back to flying condition, he can get much of his money back by parting out the airplane.

    Ron Wanttaja

  7. #17
    Sam Buchanan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    KDCU
    Posts
    526
    The salvage yards have more scrapped Cherokees than they know what to do with............................
    Sam Buchanan
    The RV Journal RV-6 build log
    Fokker D.VII semi-replica build log
    YouTube Channel

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    1,116
    That's because the cost and hassle of General Aviation has exceeded the value.

  9. #19
    geosnooker2000's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    West Tennessee
    Posts
    35
    Quote Originally Posted by Airmutt View Post
    I use understand your concern about the wing AD but I think you need to get some basic info. Some of which impacts the spar AD.........
    What year is this airframe?
    What is the AFTT?
    When was is last flown?
    Why was it parked?
    Are all the log available?
    ......
    That is the $64,000 question.
    This plane, when you research the N#, seems to belong to a guy that was an aircraft dealer LLC who got sued in 2013, and if you believe internet chatter, probably did some jail time. He/they have a current website that is completely empty. They have a phone number that only yields a busy signal, and a cell phone number that doesn't get answered. I called the FBO and asked if they knew who owned the plane, and how to get in touch with them. They said they would do a little research and call me back. That was Thursday. Haven't heard a thing. I mean, I'm in no hurry - still financially recovering from Christmas lol. So, Imma wait a little while before I press the issue.

    And BTW, @ Ron Wanttaja,
    That wasn't my (the O.P.) estimate. I was using this guy as an example of what IS POSSIBLE (not to be confused with probable).
    http://www.thisoldcherokee.com/

  10. #20
    FlyingRon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    NC26 (Catawba, NC)
    Posts
    2,324
    If you want to know the ownership, there are companies that will perform that for a fee. You start with what the name on the FAA records says. It will either be a US individual (LPR or citizen) or a corporation/LLC/Trust with US entities controlling it. Of course, if the entities are in jail or otherwise unavailable to you, you're screwed.

    As pointed out, even if they signed over the title for nothing, you like are going to have more to put in to it than it's going to be worth. The engine alone can swamp the value of an older Cherokee. Add to that everything made of rubber (tire, fuel lines, seals in the carb, etc...) are likely to need replacing. That doesn't even begin to address the nightmare if there is corrosion. While Cherokees don't tend to have a whole lot of ADs on the, there are a few onerous ones (like the wing spar) and if that's not been done, you'll have to have it done (and if necessary fixed), before any IA will sign off the annual. It goes on from there. A poorly researched aircraft is no bargain.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •