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Thread: Help from the EAA to save the model airplane hobby

  1. #11

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    Thanks Tom and everyone else! That’s great to hear the EAA is wanting to get involved. I mean no disrespect to the AMA by asking, just that more friends are always better, especially in a case like this where the EAA has extensive experience dealing with the FAA.

    It’s funny you mention the youth program in partnership with the AMA. Some club members and I were just talking about that! We have some ideas to promote the club, hobby, and aviation in general and this is on the list.

    I’ll keep an eye out for the EAA’s comments. Please let me know if there’s anything I can contribute.

  2. #12

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    Mr. Jack,

    I agree with you 100 percent sir. I am 42 years old and I STILL build remote control aircraft. I still build static model airplanes too. As a kid, it was the only way that I could get my aviation fix. Currently, I am building my on airplane from a kit.

    If anything the FAA needs to be promoting R/C model programs instead of regulating them. Just think where the majority of us would be without the R/C aircraft world. I know it inspired me and many many others.

    So what your saying is that if I own a plot of land and decide I want to make a landing strip on it to fly my R/C planes, the FAA will not allow without some red tape involved?

    Thank you for your advocacy sir. We must never let the government take the R/C community!

    Sincerely and Respectively,

    Yellowhammer

  3. #13

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    Have you ever noticed that all the line control model planes, also known as U control, have the line attachment on the end of the left wing, therefore they only fly in counterclockwise or left circles. This has been a long time indoctrination program by the libs behind all this to get our school children used to turning left. Same way as all the cowboy movies show mounting a horse from the left side. And if airplanes have a fold down door like a T-6 or Spitfire, its always on the left side.
    Finally, someone in the FAA or the GOVT. has ferreted out this devious practices and is about to regulate them. How much of our tax money will this diligence use?

  4. #14
    lnuss's Avatar
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    Hmmm... I'm curious what U-control (shouldn't be regulated, since it's tethered rather low) has to do with regulation of R/C models.

    Same way as all the cowboy movies show mounting a horse from the left side.
    That goes WAAAY back, long before even model aircraft.

    Larry N.

  5. #15
    rwanttaja's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lnuss View Post
    Hmmm... I'm curious what U-control (shouldn't be regulated, since it's tethered rather low) has to do with regulation of R/C models.


    That goes WAAAY back, long before even model aircraft.
    That's one of my favorite routines, when I run kids through the cockpit of my Fly Baby.

    "Now, you always get into an open cockpit airplane from the left side. Do you know why?"

    [wait for kid response]

    "It's because you always get on a HORSE from the left side."

    I then wait a few beats, and ask, "Now, why do you get on horse from the left side?"

    And that answer is...because your sword won't tangle. Right-handed folks wore their swords on the left hip, and if they tried to get on a horse from the right side, the sword would be between them and the saddle.

    Ron Wanttaja

  6. #16
    DaleB's Avatar
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    Not to mention most folks are right handed, so using their dominant hand and arm to pull themselves up usually makes more sense.

    Dale "You take all the fun out of things" B.
    Measure twice, cut once...
    scratch head, shrug, shim to fit.

    Flying an RV-12. Building a Fisher Celebrity.

  7. #17
    Airmutt's Avatar
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    And we enter Cubs and Champs from the right...why? Because that’s where they put the door. Ba dum bum.
    Dave Shaw
    EAA 67180 Lifetime
    Learn to Build, Build to Fly, Fly for Fun

  8. #18

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    I think EAA will need to contact Senator Inhofe directly. The people have no sway or authority over the deep state directly.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yellowhammer View Post
    So what your saying is that if I own a plot of land and decide I want to make a landing strip on it to fly my R/C planes, the FAA will not allow without some red tape involved?

    Thank you for your advocacy sir. We must never let the government take the R/C community!

    Sincerely and Respectively,

    Yellowhammer

    Yessir, that’s exactly it. They want all unmanned aircraft to be able to identify themselves remotely. That sounds like a decent idea on the surface, but they aren’t leaving any leeway for planes built from kits or partially assembled ones. They appear to be making a small carve-out for fixed flying sites, but after one year they won’t accept any new applications for these sites and renewals are at their discretion.

    So so if a few years from now you buy some land, build your retirement home with a nice grass runway, you won’t be able to fly an RC airplane you built yourself.

    The NPRM is so poorly written that it’s difficult to understand why they’d even release it. Maybe they wanted to get something out there before the new year and rushed it through.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by jack.estes View Post
    Yessir, that’s exactly it. They want all unmanned aircraft to be able to identify themselves remotely. That sounds like a decent idea on the surface, but they aren’t leaving any leeway for planes built from kits or partially assembled ones. They appear to be making a small carve-out for fixed flying sites, but after one year they won’t accept any new applications for these sites and renewals are at their discretion.

    So so if a few years from now you buy some land, build your retirement home with a nice grass runway, you won’t be able to fly an RC airplane you built yourself.

    The NPRM is so poorly written that it’s difficult to understand why they’d even release it. Maybe they wanted to get something out there before the new year and rushed it through.

    I live on a private airpark, and we regularly fly R/C. So, are we considered a "flying field" and, I guess you'd say "exempt" or will we not be permitted to fly there anymore?

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