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Thread: Pearl Harbor Day, Have We Forgotten ?

  1. #31
    BusyLittleShop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rwanttaja View Post
    Heck, even the victors can't always agree. What we call "World War Two," the Russians call "The Great Patriotic War."
    True... WW2 is a subject we learned not to bring up playing WarBirds
    which is a world wide interactive air combat game... you picked a 4
    digit call sign (mine is XLAX) then pick a color... I flew for the
    Golds... as a gold you battled against the Reds and Purples and
    Greens... each of four color has its own dedicated radio channel but
    the Gray channel was the community channel that could be read by all
    four colors... without exception if someone mentioned "World War Two"
    the gamers in Russia would counter with do you mean the "The Great
    Patriotic War"??? a passionate argument would go on and on... it was
    clear that the Russians gamers weren't mere kids but learned aviation
    buffs like us who read about and dreamed about flying and fighting in
    WW2...
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  2. #32
    Mayhemxpc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rwanttaja View Post
    "Battle of the Greasy Grass" is what the Sioux called it...and I think the victors should be allowed to name the battle. :-)

    Ron "Custer was wearing an arrow shirt" Wanttaja
    That just opens a whole can of worms regarding any battlefield within 100 miles of where I live!
    Chris Mayer
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    www.o2cricket.com

  3. #33
    Mayhemxpc's Avatar
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    Funny thing about that. Manassas was not the nearest town then, in fact it wasn't even a town. It was a railway junction with about four houses and a stationhouse. The town of Yorkshire was closer and where the Confederate HQ was. The battlefield itself was on Yorkshire plantation. So why wasn't it the battle of Yorkshire?

    If you really want to read about an unlucky person -- someone there at the beginning and end -- look up Wilmer McLean.

    In the middle ages, when armies had heralds, the heralds of both sides would get together to agree on a name for the battle.

    Dispatch sent from Manassas in Federal Occupied Northern Virginia
    Chris Mayer
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  4. #34
    FlyingRon's Avatar
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    In fact, it really was "Manassas Junction" if you look at period documents. Note that the naming "convention" isn't universal. For example, I lived pretty much on the Ox Hill/Chantilly Battlefield. Chantilly was the Union name, Ox Hill was the confederate name. Chantilly wasn't a town back then, but an estate. Ox Hill, was essentialy, a hill that Oxen travelled over.

  5. #35

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    Flying Ron, one thing I do know about it the battle of the Alamo, that you call " a catestropic loss for the Texans". Well the Texans lost every man, about 185, but they never had any illusions that they could defeat an army of 3000 or 4000, and that is clear from Travis's letters which survive. Travis and the other Texans chose a place to die and more or less the time for it.
    But in 185 men holding an old church for 13 days against 5000, the delay gave Sam Houston some time to organize what army the Texans had to the east. And when the Mexican cannon finally holed the north wall,making the end inevitable the defenders took a terrible toll on the attacking forces. Santa Anna took no part in the actual fighting, he watched from a safe distance and later called it " a small affair." But his adjutant whose job it was to accurately count the battle said, "we brought to San Antonio more than 5000 men and we left 1570 of them there on the ground. "
    So 6 weeks later when Santa Anna went east to San Jacinto just outside Houston, the Texan army of about 800 men routed the Mexican army of about 1200 in an hour. Believe it or not Houston allowed Santa Anna to live in echange to ceding Texas. Not only a moral victory , but can you imagine the immense wealth that is now modern day Texas and gained by the lives and efforts of these 1000 men.

  6. #36
    Mayhemxpc's Avatar
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    H.G. Wells wrote that "Isolated bands of men rarely sell their lives dearly." This may be true overall, but the examples of where that did happen resound through history.
    Chris Mayer
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  7. #37
    BusyLittleShop's Avatar
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    New to my collection is this sobering January 1941 Popular Aviation article... Mercy, I wonder if Admiral Kimmel was of the same mindset???

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