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  1. #1

    Tig Welder recommendations?

    Our chapter is discussing the merits of adding a Tig welding outfit to our tool crib.
    What recommendations would you make for a Tig unit suitable for use in the aviation environment?
    What are the SportAir workshops using?
    I know there are a lot of variables, just trying to get a discussion seeded.
    Thanks

  2. #2

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    Beyond stating the obvious that Miller and Lincoln are HUGE presences at AirVenture? I got nuthin'. lol
    "Don't believe everything you see or read on the internet" - Abraham Lincoln

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronald Franck View Post
    Our chapter is discussing the merits of adding a Tig welding outfit to our tool crib.
    What recommendations would you make for a Tig unit suitable for use in the aviation environment?
    What are the SportAir workshops using?
    I know there are a lot of variables, just trying to get a discussion seeded.
    Thanks
    Do you already have a Mig.

    Jake Speed

  4. #4
    I bought a Lincoln Square Wave TIG for my birthday last year to weld aluminum. Its a bit of a gas hog but I'm very happy with its performance. I liked at the Miller equivalent and went Lincoln due to its detachable/servicable torch.

    https://www.lincolnelectric.com/en-u...ncolnElectric)

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Desertdave View Post
    I bought a Lincoln Square Wave TIG for my birthday last year to weld aluminum. Its a bit of a gas hog but I'm very happy with its performance. I liked at the Miller equivalent and went Lincoln due to its detachable/servicable torch.

    https://www.lincolnelectric.com/en-u...ncolnElectric)

    A good MIG welder has advantages over the TIG.

    I would Google, the truth is out there.

    Jake Speed

  6. #6
    cwilliamrose's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Speed View Post
    A good MIG welder has advantages over the TIG.
    Don't hold back, tell us about these advantages.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by cwilliamrose View Post
    Don't hold back, tell us about these advantages.
    From my standpoint, and IMHO, MIG can weld much thicker metals to thin, TIG is limited to thin materials.

    Learning to MIG is easier. I like easy.

    I listed two advantages. There are disadvantages also. My MIG work was for car metal restoration and related tasks.

    Jake Speed

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Speed View Post
    A good MIG welder has advantages over the TIG.

    I would Google, the truth is out there.

    Jake Speed
    Better go back to school. Only advantage is ease of use. Can't do chromoly. Cant do magnesium, can't do, can't do.

  9. #9
    Ron, I had a business building J-3 fuel tanks (FAA-PMA) and used a Lincoln V205T, which was the top of the line at the time. Right before they ended production of the welder Lincoln listed for around $8K (I paid $3K in 2005). It still performs great to this day. As a "travel" welder I got the AlphaTIG 200 (Amazon $720). The Alpha does just fine. If you are a connoisseur you may be able to notice a smoother arc from the Lincoln, better amp control from the better foot pedal, etc. An experienced weldor using either welder will get a great weld. I would be careful with a "club" welder. I work in a shop with many A&P's and the care they take of their own tools is vastly different from the care they take of company tools. One drop or other abuse could render an expensive piece of equipment inop. All of that to say....the "welder" is not as important as the "weldor". Miller, Lincoln, HTP, ESAB, Alpha, MT, etc, etc, etc are all good units.--Ross PS watch Jody at weldingtipsandtricks.com for tig welder reviews.

  10. #10

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    I bought a Lincoln Precissio TIG 225 some years ago. I have owned a Miller Dial Arc 250 HF and a Miller 300 APB years ago. The Lincoln is the least expensive machine I have owned and it welds the best. I can weld .032 aluminum easily with the Lincoln, never with the Millers. The foot amperage control is the best of any of the machines I have owned. I paid under $2,000 for the Lincoln.

    The best addition I have made to this machine is to change over to a HW20 sized water cooled torch, from the original air-cooled torch. For the water cooler I have a plastic storage bin ( about 5 gallons) and a submersible pump that cost less than $100 from McMaster-Carr.

    Most of the welding I do would be called aircraft type. Materials are generally .035 to .080 steel both mild and alloy steels and aluminum from .032 to .060.

    I have spent both time and money trying to make MIG welding work for my work with no luck. My worst night mayor is getting one of my products in the shop for repairs where someone has tried to repair a crack with a MIG welder. I now have the original crack to repair plus 2 new ones on either side of the MIG weld bead.
    Last edited by lathropdad; 10-03-2019 at 04:34 PM.

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