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Thread: Lycoming Luscombe Info Wanted

  1. #1

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    Lycoming Luscombe Info Wanted

    Hello All,

    I am considering buying a barn find Luscombe B which has an Lycombing 0-145 engine. I know nothing about this engine. Can I get some insight on the cost to overhaul, who does it, are there still parts readily available? Are there exhaust parts and mag parts out there? I noticed that on one cylinder the two spark plugs are much larger than all the others, is this standard for the engine or perhaps it is a repair? What other aircraft flew with this engine? thanks so much.
    albert

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by outermarker View Post
    Hello All,

    I am considering buying a barn find Luscombe B which has an Lycombing 0-145 engine. I know nothing about this engine. Can I get some insight on the cost to overhaul, who does it, are there still parts readily available? Are there exhaust parts and mag parts out there? I noticed that on one cylinder the two spark plugs are much larger than all the others, is this standard for the engine or perhaps it is a repair? What other aircraft flew with this engine? thanks so much.
    albert
    You're not looking at a homebuilt, but there is at least one owner of a Lyc O-145 powered Taylorcraft and one guy looking to sell an O-145 on the homebuiltairplanes.com website, so it might be worth joining up over there to ask your question. The Lycoming is an obsolete engine, although some parts are apparently available. That engine flew on Aeroncas, Taylorcraft, Luscombes, and presumably Cubs. It is generally considered underpowered compared to the A-65 Continental, which was a contemporary engine. Most aircraft with the Lycoming have converted to the Continental over the years to gain performance and a more common/more serviceable engine.
    Last edited by Kyle Boatright; 09-11-2019 at 01:12 PM.

  3. #3
    FlyinAdamBadger's Avatar
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    I know a guy named Robert "Bob" Khuns who has a 1946 Luscombe 8E (N331BK) that doesn't live to far from your location. He is based out of the Geneseo Airpark-Airport (3G8) in Geneseo, Illinois. But, I think he has the Continental version in his.
    Last edited by FlyinAdamBadger; 09-11-2019 at 08:52 AM.

  4. #4

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    Thanks for the replies. I'll follow up on the leads.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by outermarker View Post
    Hello All,

    I am considering buying a barn find Luscombe B which has an Lycombing 0-145 engine. I know nothing about this engine. Can I get some insight on the cost to overhaul, who does it, are there still parts readily available? Are there exhaust parts and mag parts out there? I noticed that on one cylinder the two spark plugs are much larger than all the others, is this standard for the engine or perhaps it is a repair? What other aircraft flew with this engine? thanks so much.
    albert
    The O-145 is actually a decent engine but lacks parts support due to its limited production time. You are looking at an 8B which came with the 65HP Lycoming. Have flown both the O-145 and GO-145 in the 60’s in the Mooney Mite, Funk, and what we called the Stinson 10B (2 place). Properly maintained, the O-145 is reliable and smooth. Sounds like a good barn find and well worth restoration. I would attempt a rebuild of the Lycoming if you can locate parts, if not - change the mount and go with an 85 Continental. Best of luck.
    VR.. Don Stits
    Last edited by Snaproll; 09-13-2019 at 10:31 PM.

  6. #6

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    For the time and expense you invest to make that thing airworthy, you could probably find a good Cessna 152 for the same investment in money. AND already be airworthy.

    I learned on a Luscombe in the 60's but my first aircraft was a 152.

    Jake Speed

  7. #7
    Dana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Speed View Post
    For the time and expense you invest to make that thing airworthy, you could probably find a good Cessna 152 for the same investment in money. AND already be airworthy.
    Perhaps, but a 152 isn't nearly as cool.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dana View Post
    Perhaps, but a 152 isn't nearly as cool.
    I've never looked at GA as being cool, only as safe and practical transportation.


    Cross-county.

    Jake Speed

  9. #9
    Dana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Speed View Post
    I've never looked at GA as being cool, only as safe and practical transportation.
    My Hatz is safe, I think it's pretty cool, but "practical transportation" it certainly is not. But if I was looking for practical transportation I wouldn't be looking at a 152 either.

  10. #10
    lnuss's Avatar
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    Many of us look at something beyond "safe and practical transportation." In fact that's (for me) one of the lesser, but nice, factors. Enjoyment of the challenges or the nostalgia or the view from upstairs or many other things factor in (for me) ahead of "safe and practical transportation." Tailwheels and older aircraft (Stearman, Cub, Citabria, T-Craft, etc.) and aerobatic aircraft are more attractive to me than Mooneys and Arrows (I might almost make an exception for the Bonanza since it's fun).

    Cessna 180s/185s, as an example, allow getting in to the back country more easily than Bonanza/Mooney/Arrow do. Bonanza is my favorite for trips, but for local a Cub or Champ or Luscombe are more enjoyable and a little more challenging, as well, which adds to the attraction. I could go on, but I think you get the idea. So we have different purposes for aviation. Each to his own.

    P.S. The C-150/152 aren't all that attractive to me (I have plenty of time in both), and they're not all that comfortable either.

    Larry N.

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