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Thread: Captain Al Haynes flies west

  1. #1
    cub builder's Avatar
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    Captain Al Haynes flies west

    I'm surprised that nobody on this forum noted the passing of Captain Al Haynes this last week. Captain Haynes was the pilot of the DC-10 that lost all flight controls when the tail engine failed and destroyed all three control systems. Captain Haynes brought cockpit resource management to the forefront using himself, his co-pilot, and a third pilot that was hopping a ride to fly the DC-10 to an emergency landing in Souix City, IA using nothing but throttles of the two remaining engines for control. Most of the passengers survived the landing with the plane breaking apart, rolling and plowing through a cornfield next to the runway. Captain Haynes was the US Celebrity Pilot Hero before Chesley Sullenburger.

    -Cub Builder
    Last edited by cub builder; 08-28-2019 at 03:55 PM.

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    Scooper's Avatar
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    Captain Haynes was a true hero and a heckuva nice guy. One of my friends and a neighbor, Arnie Jackson (gone west) was a retired UAL DC-10 captain who flew with Al Haynes several times, and I met the man twice. When recounting the crash, he always gave credit to the other crew members onboard flight 232 and downplayed his own role.

    When the Sioux City tower told him he was cleared to land "on any runway" Haynes replied with a chuckle, "Oh, you want to be specific and make it a runway."

    At 87, he had a good run. Go well, Captain.
    - Stan, Private Pilot ASEL, LSR-I, EAA 115792 (since 1966)
    Zenith CH601XLi-B, N601KE, KSTS



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    I heard him speak about the incident a few years ago at an EAA chapter meeting at KLZU. His story is not only an amazing account of unflappable grit, creativity, and perseverance in the face of seemingly insurmountable odds, he was a completely gentle, humble, and even humorous guy. It was inspiring.

    Skip

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    Al did all he could do,but it did not affect control of the airplane. Analysis showed that turning the yoke or rudder had no connection to the control surfaces, did not move them at all. The only control was by the pilot who came up from the passenger section and operated the throttles, using full throttle to climb and reduce to descend and differential throttle to turn. I don't know his name, be most don't know him either.

  5. #5
    Low Pass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Greenwood View Post
    Al did all he could do,but it did not affect control of the airplane. Analysis showed that turning the yoke or rudder had no connection to the control surfaces, did not move them at all. The only control was by the pilot who came up from the passenger section and operated the throttles, using full throttle to climb and reduce to descend and differential throttle to turn. I don't know his name, be most don't know him either.
    As I recall, Haynes was still in command issuing calls for control of the plane throughout the flight.
    Bryan

    Houston

  6. #6
    gbrasch's Avatar
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    I got to hear him speak once also, amazing man. And I remember years ago he had a daughter with cancer. There was fund raining going on for her within the aviation community. Anyone hear how she turned out? Well I hope.
    Glenn Brasch
    KRYN Tucson, Arizona
    2013 RV-9A
    Medevac helicopter pilot (Ret)
    EAA member since 1980
    Owner, "Airport Courtesy Cars" website.
    www.airportcourtesycars.com
    Volunteer Mentor www.SoAZTeenAviation.org

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  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Greenwood View Post
    Al did all he could do,but it did not affect control of the airplane. Analysis showed that turning the yoke or rudder had no connection to the control surfaces, did not move them at all. The only control was by the pilot who came up from the passenger section and operated the throttles, using full throttle to climb and reduce to descend and differential throttle to turn. I don't know his name, be most don't know him either.
    ALL three hydraulic systems were disabled when the #2 engine failed, so the only control left was by manipulating the thrust of the #1 and #3 engines as you stated. However, it was Captain Haynes who directed those actions made by Captain Fitch. Captain Haynes also directed the overall situation, including the diversionary airport choice and the timing of the landing gear extension; that's just two examples.

    The crew of UA232 saved many lives that day; that crew was lead by Captain Al Haynes.

    Please see F.A.R. 121.533(d),(e), 91.7(b) and 91.3(a).

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by cub builder View Post
    I'm surprised that nobody on this forum noted the passing of Captain Al Haynes this last week. Captain Haynes was the pilot of the DC-10 that lost all flight controls when the tail engine failed and destroyed all three control systems. Captain Haynes brought cockpit resource management to the forefront using himself, his co-pilot, and a third pilot that was hopping a ride to fly the DC-10 to an emergency landing in Souix City, IA using nothing but throttles of the two remaining engines for control. Most of the passengers survived the landing with the plane breaking apart, rolling and plowing through a cornfield next to the runway. Captain Haynes was the US Celebrity Pilot Hero before Chesley Sullenburger.

    -Cub Builder

    Thank you for posting this passing. I agree it should have made the news.

    As a fellow crew member I salute his passing. One can not say enough good things about him or the overall results of this incident.

  10. #10
    Scooper's Avatar
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    Denny Fitch was the deadheading captain (and check pilot) who handled the throttles. There's a great interview with him on YouTube. It's long (55 minutes), but really worth watching if you have the time.

    - Stan, Private Pilot ASEL, LSR-I, EAA 115792 (since 1966)
    Zenith CH601XLi-B, N601KE, KSTS



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