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Thread: Where Have All the EAB Aircraft Gone?

  1. #11

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    There was actually a number of older EA-B homebuilts at Airventure 2019. Several SX-300 and several Dyke Delta including the original. Because EAA took the effort to invite them, I think.
    Arlington regional fly-in doesn't do that and was almost empty this year. I think Airventure will last somewhat longer, as the other fly-ins gradually die off.

    At Air Venture 2019 Burt Rutan bemoaned the fact that nothing new has arrived in past four years. And I notice nothing new or Homebuilt related is on the cover of Sport Aviation anymore. So nothing in the magazine to grow new amateur designers to replace the old ones like Burt. And no incentive to bring new stuff like there was in the ‘70s.
    Last edited by Bill Berson; 08-22-2019 at 08:41 AM.

  2. #12
    cwilliamrose's Avatar
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    A number of friends have expressed that the lack of crowd control will keep them away after bringing their airplanes to Oshkosh in recent years. In the distant past event attendance was limited to EAA members and others with suitable aviation credentials. Now it seems you need to baby sit your airplane in order to protect it from the 'public' -- there's no fun in that.

  3. #13

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    Young eagles is a great program. I have supported it for years. For a couple of hours of "study" they get a free airplane ride and maybe some stick time. Back up. I said a couple of hours of study.
    Now, go to a restaurant, high school basketball/football game, swimming pool, beach or any public area. How many of those kids with their heads down in their cell phones are willing to put it down and invest eighty thousand dollars and three to six years building an airplane? General aviation started dying fifteen years ago. We didn't have the answer then and we don't have the answer now. Neither does Rutan or Vangrunsven.

  4. #14

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    I'm 70 and I grew up fixing that which was broken. "Stuff' was manufactured with an eye to repairing it and replacing parts down the road to keep it running. VERY little for the past several decades has been built with that process in mind. Rather things are now meant to be thrown away when they break and a new cheaper one bought to replace it.

    Durn few 'shop' classes exist in our schools. Few of the younger ones can troubleshoot and fix anything. That a new aircraft of most any kind, especially an "affordable" LSA, starts at THREE to FIVE times the cost of my 2019 Hyundai SUV is insanity personified. With most everything in aviation priced for the 'yacht and country club' set, is it any wonder that GA is in the state it is in? Sure ancient (30-70yr old)airplanes can be found for lower cost, but the new generation of owners would be unable to maintain them. When a new LSA costs the same or more than an Aston Martin Vantage? Expect to see about as many being sold to about the same demographic.

    I 'could' likely qualify to earn a Sport Pilot license, if there were instructors, flight schools and most importantly aircraft available to rent after licensing that were not a two hour drive away. But there really aren't. I've had a true passion for all things aviation my entire life. The current state of affairs is honestly depressing.
    Last edited by CHICAGORANDY; 08-22-2019 at 08:08 PM.
    "Don't believe everything you see or read on the internet" - Abraham Lincoln

  5. #15

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    Vans is doing well in their market … much better than any of the certificated OEMs are doing in the small, GA market. Plans airplanes are probably part of the past due to the long hours to build and the CNC machining available to everyone. On that note, kits (like Vans) are doing well because of the new, computerized machining technologies.

    Those that are complaining about there being no new homebuilts haven't looked on the south end of the airport and the ultralight runway area where business, activity and flying is booming all the time. The new STOL airplanes are prolific, too! In addition, those people also haven't been in the Innovations area (go figure) where electric airplanes, quads, hexes, octos, etc. are prolific, too.

    Maybe the new generation(s) is(are) NOT looking for what the older generations built. Take RC airplanes as a great example. RC was expensive and very time consuming when I was young (and I'm on the less experienced end of the EAA crowd). Today for well under $100 and less than a day or two, anyone can be flying their own RC airplane!

    Where's the "Can Do" spirit that Paul installed in all of us?

    Ron "stepping off my soap box for a moment" Blum

    PS. Paul's only been gone for 6 years, but I miss him dearly.
    Last edited by Ron Blum; 08-22-2019 at 07:53 PM.

  6. #16

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    I was at the south end all week. None of those quad, hex, EVTOL things flew this year or last year. Why is that?

    Paul is still here in the EAA archives. He was constantly pushing to make aircraft attainable.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Berson View Post
    I was at the south end all week. None of those quad, hex, EVTOL things flew this year or last year. Why is that?
    I wondered that myself. The Blackfly was there a year ago and had <supposedly> been flying out in California. A year later and they don't have it buzzing around the UL field? I can't understand why they didn't have one flying the UL pattern several times a day. It would have been a sensation.

  8. #18

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    I figure the FAA won't give approval without an airworthiness certificate. I don't think the FAA will let them fly at Airventure as FAR 103 ultralights either. They don't exactly comply with FAR 103. (yes, I know the owners claim they do)

    Or EAA doesn't let them fly for insurance or whatever reason?

    That Japanese ultralight, weight shift, jet powered flying wing that flew late Tuesday had a flight permit of some sort. (I asked the pilot)

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Berson View Post
    ... They don't exactly comply with FAR 103. (yes, I know the owners claim they do)
    Out of curiosity, why doesn't it comply with 103?

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle Boatright View Post
    Out of curiosity, why doesn't it comply with 103?
    None of them comply with FAR103.1 (e) (4) "Has a power-off stall speed which does not exceed 24 knots calibrated airspeed."

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