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Thread: Need Guidance

  1. #1

    Need Guidance

    Hi
    I am a hobbyist and am stuck up . I have an appliance which is a U shaped groove . I need to make a positive of it with a couple of grooves for a O ring type suction rings.
    I had the part scanned and have the positive for it as an .stl file. Which I have imported to solidworks2012 and is saved as a .sldprt file.( Assembly.1)
    I have designed the negative for the suction ring and this is also saved as .sldprt file.(Assembly.2)
    Please refer to the pictures attached pictures
    My problem:-

    1. When I go to assembly and open both the .sldprt files the feature manager shows both the files are open.
    2. Both the files are fixed
    3. I make one file ( suction ring) as float.
    4. Unable to see the sketch/model(suction ring)
    5. Suction ring designed is in millimeters with a diameter of 3mm while the other part is a of a diameter of 1cm . I have changed the color of the suction ring to dark red but still it is not visible. Can somebody please tell me what Is the issue here.
    6. I need to insert the suction ring part into the positive of the scan so as to get a pitted surface which can be 3D printed to obtain a mould/negative die for the part.(Assembly part representation.3)


    Can somebody guide me. I have solidworks 2012
    Attached Images Attached Images    

  2. #2
    SOLIDWORKS Support Volunteer Jeffrey Meyer's Avatar
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    Israel
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    Could you please give us a little more background to this problem?
    What are you trying to design?
    Where does your data come from?
    Is there any other format (other than STL) available?
    Is this an aviation project? (The picture you provided looks like a fossilized tooth or a very rusty door handle)

    Jeffrey

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffrey Meyer View Post
    Could you please give us a little more background to this problem?
    What are you trying to design?
    Where does your data come from?
    Is there any other format (other than STL) available?
    Is this an aviation project? (The picture you provided looks like a fossilized tooth or a very rusty door handle)

    Jeffrey
    Hi
    About the project.
    This is no aviation related project.
    The part is a horse shoe shaped piece of metal with a horse shoe shaped buldge. The present image is a scanned copy of the impression I made of the part with silicone mold material and then got it 3d scanned as an impression thus I got a .obj file which the scanning software converted to a positive as an .stl file. The stl file was imported into solidworks and saved as .sldprt file.

    The horse shoe part is the top part of my son's toy , it used to have a handle with a removable base which used to kind of stick onto that part but it has worn off. Hence I am trying to design a cover with inner of the base which closely adapts to the part , and has "O" ring type suction cups in the inner silicon lining so as to increase the adhesion. ( Its like putting a few small suction cups on the inside of the cover.
    I also have the original .obj file of the part.but i am unable to import it into solidworks 2012. the scan to 3d feature is not there in this version. So can you suggest a way of getting the 3d mesh into solidworks.

  4. #4
    SOLIDWORKS Support Volunteer Jeffrey Meyer's Avatar
    Join Date
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    Location
    Israel
    Posts
    148
    Ok - A few comments:

    1. Although SW has the option of importing STL files, this is a bad idea. STL files are a collection of triangular faces that SW treats as individual features. It then tries to "stitch" the edges of each triangular face to its adjacent neighbor and form a solid. This is a massively compute intensive task that IMHO does not justify the effort.
    2. Since we're talking about a toy, the geometry does not have to be exact. I therefore suggest that you could design the part from scratch in SW. Then you can do what you like with it - make a mould or 3D print it, etc. (If it has to be metal, then this sounds like a very interesting toy )
    3. In other words, instead of trying to solve the problem, I suggest working around it/avoiding it - I doubt your son will notice the difference, but you will do it with a fraction of the effort.

    Hope this helps.
    Jeffrey

  5. #5
    EAA Staff
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
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    119
    I'm not sure if this webinar we did would be helpful (if nothing else, grab the contact info at the end):
    https://eaa.org/eaa/eaa-membership/e...and-solidworks

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Cory Puuri View Post
    I'm not sure if this webinar we did would be helpful (if nothing else, grab the contact info at the end):
    https://eaa.org/eaa/eaa-membership/e...and-solidworks
    Thanks, Cory and Jeffery.

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