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Thread: Homebuilts Deregistered in 2018

  1. #11

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    Ron, I think the line of thought that the economy lag might be slowing things down is right on the money.

    If there was a sudden rush this year in folks buying kits (because few are true plans built anymore), we'd see the spike in registrations three to five years from now.

    The Kitfox number raised an eyebrow, but then again, there are a lot of them out there.
    The opinions and statements of this poster are largely based on facts and portray a possible version of the actual events.

  2. #12
    robert l's Avatar
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    Ron, I couldn't access the link you posted, got one of those 404 pages. Thanks for the info, if I go to the FAA website and look for de-registeration I should be able to find it. And Marty, I like the last sentence, " Now the number of FAA employees per plane is even higher!" Well, hopefully they can catch up a little, and maybe they can get a wiggle on and finish up my paper work. I've been going at it for over a year now.
    Bob

  3. #13
    rwanttaja's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by robert l View Post
    Ron, I couldn't access the link you posted, got one of those 404 pages.
    Thanks...I botched the file transfer to my web page. Should work now:

    http://www.wanttaja.com/dereg_2018.xlsx

    Quote Originally Posted by robert l View Post
    Thanks for the info, if I go to the FAA website and look for de-registeration I should be able to find it.
    There are search functions on the FAA page, but they're kind of crude. I get my data by downloading the complete FAA registry...

    http://registry.faa.gov/database/ReleasableAircraft.zip

    Open the ZIP file, and the deregistrations are in: DEREG.TXT. The 13th column is headed "Certification"; planes listed as "42" are Experimental Amateur-built (The 4 denotes experimental, and the 2 is the code for Amateur-Built).

    Unfortunately, the dereg file does not directly show the aircraft type. The third column is "MFR-MDL-CODE," which is a cross-reference to the ACFTREF.TXT file. I use Microsoft Access to merge the files, but you can use the "VLOOKUP" function in Excel as well.

    The page that handles the registry is:

    https://www.faa.gov/licenses_certifi...raft_download/

    Ron Wanttaja

  4. #14

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    The looming ADS-B mandate is pushing some marginal unused aircraft away from the city. (or scrapped or deregistered)

  5. #15
    rwanttaja's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Berson View Post
    The looming ADS-B mandate is pushing some marginal unused aircraft away from the city. (or scrapped or deregistered)
    It *is* interesting to note that the closer the deadline gets, the more aircraft are being deregistered....

    Ron "Coincidence, not causality" Wanttaja

  6. #16
    cub builder's Avatar
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    I suspect a lot of it is aging pilots that are no longer flying. Looking through the Excel file Ron provided, I noted quite a number of planesI know quite well. Most are still owned by pilots that I know. In most cases, they are older pilots that can no longer fly, but haven't brought themselves to part with the plane they spent years building, and many years flying. In some other cases, they are planes that I know have been re-registered under a different registration number, but are still flying. And still another group are planes that have simply fallen into neglect and are likely sitting in the back of a hangar or a garage in pieces.

  7. #17
    rwanttaja's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cub builder View Post
    I suspect a lot of it is aging pilots that are no longer flying. Looking through the Excel file Ron provided, I noted quite a number of planesI know quite well. Most are still owned by pilots that I know. In most cases, they are older pilots that can no longer fly, but haven't brought themselves to part with the plane they spent years building, and many years flying. In some other cases, they are planes that I know have been re-registered under a different registration number, but are still flying. And still another group are planes that have simply fallen into neglect and are likely sitting in the back of a hangar or a garage in pieces.
    Pretty much my opinion, as well. With the recurring requirement to keep the registration active, more older owners are basically faced with finally having to finally face if they're going to be able to get their planes flying again.

    I do have one slight disagreement with your post. When an airplane gets a new N-Number, it doesn't look like the old one is added to the deregistration list. The deregistration list isn't just a column of N-Numbers; it has the aircraft code that identifies the make, model, and serial number. So the FAA doesn't list the same aircraft in both the active and inactive list, even if the N-numbers disagree.

    About a hundred EABs got new N-Numbers in 2018, and none of the old numbers appeared in the deregistered list under the same aircraft type. About 40 of the N-Numbers were listed in the deregistration list, but as different makes/models of aircraft (e.g., they got an N-Number previously used by another aircraft).

    In some cases, planes that were previously deregistered are returned to the active list. I understand that the FAA doesn't re-use the N-Number for five years, to accomodate cases like this. One case pointed out to me was deregistered in March 2018, but restored to the active list in February 2019.

    Ron Wanttaja

  8. #18
    cub builder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rwanttaja View Post
    I do have one slight disagreement with your post. When an airplane gets a new N-Number, it doesn't look like the old one is added to the deregistration list. The deregistration list isn't just a column of N-Numbers; it has the aircraft code that identifies the make, model, and serial number. So the FAA doesn't list the same aircraft in both the active and inactive list, even if the N-numbers disagree.

    About a hundred EABs got new N-Numbers in 2018, and none of the old numbers appeared in the deregistered list under the same aircraft type. About 40 of the N-Numbers were listed in the deregistration list, but as different makes/models of aircraft (e.g., they got an N-Number previously used by another aircraft).

    In some cases, planes that were previously deregistered are returned to the active list. I understand that the FAA doesn't re-use the N-Number for five years, to accomodate cases like this. One case pointed out to me was deregistered in March 2018, but restored to the active list in February 2019.

    Ron Wanttaja
    You are correct. I went back and looked at the instance I cited and found it was actually a different owner/builder by the same name with a very similar registration number. My mistake.

  9. #19
    SaltedTailfeathers's Avatar
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    What's the real story? Less aircraft and less pilots but at what rate?

    I'm aware of more aircraft owned and operated by people without licenses/certified. Unfortunately I only know one person who has the traditional private pilots license and still flying. The people who got flight training but don't have a ride, haven't kept up with medical (several with cancer and two younger ones with fertility issues) or training.

  10. #20

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    I'd wager that the vast majority of these de-registrations are people who just forgot/didn't know/don't care. The other bulk are people who lost interest in flying be it for money or medical and don't want to hassle with selling in case they get back into the hobby again some day.

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