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Thread: Speciality Oscillating Hand Tool (or 90-degree Blade)

  1. #1

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    Aug 2013
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    Speciality Oscillating Hand Tool (or 90-degree Blade)

    I have the pleasure of having to remove a fuel sender from a wing. To do this, I need to cut out the adhesive holding it to the ribs.

    I am in the need for a version of a multi-tool (oscillating tool) where the blade is mounted perpendicular to the tool's longitudinal axis. For instance, a typical multi-tool has the blade parallel to this axis. I need a mounting similar to a typical Dremel Rotary tool, where the blade is 90 degrees to the axis. It's just in this case, I don't want a rotational tool such as in a Dremel Rotary; rather, an oscillating tool instead.

    Any thoughts where this may be obtained? Alternatively, a worse case would be a hand tool (powered or not) where the blade was angled at 90 degrees from the shaft.

  2. #2
    rwanttaja's Avatar
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    Would the Dremel Multi Max do what you're looking for?


    Instead of spinning a circular saw blade, it uses a half-circle blade and vibrates it back and forth over a very short stroke (a few degrees). The blade can be installed at almost any angle to accommodate awkward locations. They're about a hundred bucks on Amazon.

    Used one to modify the cockpit coaming a few years back, and it has been handy around the house.

    Ron Wanttaja

  3. #3

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    Sorry, no - because the blade is parallel to the longitudinal axis and not perpendicular to it. If you take the above tool and move the blade 90 degrees off the current plane, this would be what I need.

  4. #4
    George Sychrovsky's Avatar
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    Just take the long flat offset blade , first straighten the offset then bend it 90 degrees as far out where the two parts are connected
    Disclaimer ; opinions of others will vary depending on what they’re selling.

    http://the-grand-design.com/

  5. #5

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    I have a Dremel Multi Max tool, it's pretty handy for lots of applications but I don't remember any blades with a 90 degree angle. Most of the blades are not very long so if you did bend one I'm guessing it would be too short for your project. The link below is for a 3" sealant cutting blade which is the longest I remember seeing. You might try getting one and bending it to see what happens. If it doesn't work your only out $7. If that doesn't work I guess your left with cutting down/shaping a putty knife and doing it by hand which doesn't sound like fun.
    Good luck

    https://www.homedepot.com/p/Genesis-...T613/204675715

  6. #6

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    @Tralika, Wouldn't this mean that the blade's oscillation would be a vertical arc? Certainly can test, but that was my hesitation - as the normal expected oscillation would be a horizontal arc, and now by bending it would be vertical.

  7. #7

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    Sounds like a job for a hacksaw blade and colorful language.
    The opinions and statements of this poster are largely based on facts and portray a possible version of the actual events.

  8. #8

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    That was last weekend

  9. #9

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    Sep 2012
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    What sort of adhesive? At a major avionics manufacturer, the production folks found that "soft" adhesives like RTV could be cut with monofilament fishing line sawed back and forth. Or, for epoxy, try heating the part you want to remove to 200 - 250 degrees F. Many times that will soften the epoxy enough that the part can be pried off without damaging the wood underneath. As a last resort, and assuming you don't want/need to save the sender, use a Dremel to grind away the part of the sender that the adhesive is attached to. Not fun, but better than hacksaw blades. (And be sure to wear safety goggles when using a Dremel)

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