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Thread: Best 2 Days to go to AirVenture

  1. #11
    DaleB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dougbush View Post
    Monday and Tuesday. Otherwise, you won’t know what you missed at the beginning. But you will hear about what you missed later, which will be a lot.
    Of course if you go Monday and Tuesday, you'll be hearing later about all the stuff you missed Wednesday and Thursday. I think any two days would be good... but three would be a lot better.
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  2. #12

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    Get the schedule, I try to avoid the days that are mostly jet acts and jet teams due to the noise which is loud enough to damage hearing. I avoid those days or leave befrore they start. Some people want to see those acts.
    You cant see half in 2 days but can have a good time. The seaplane base is nice,takes a half day.Try to walk once the length from warbirds on the north to antiques down south. There are a hundred fourms, some really good, some trying to sell you something. Id take a Tri Motor ride, $75 and only takes half hour. A lot of people watch the night airshow, which was Thur. Many of those are people who watch from outside the airport, thus no admission charge. The ultralights have their own runway at the south end and are fun to watch early mornings and a trip to Pioneer airport is a trip back in time. And one the benefits not obvious from outside is the people. EAA is like a large small town with a lot of people who may be different, even from different countries , but are there to have a good time and mostly get along in doing so. Talking to folks on the trams or sharing a table at lunch is interesting.
    Last edited by Bill Greenwood; 01-25-2019 at 12:19 PM.

  3. #13

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    What are you interested in? The responses so far are all from EAA types (like me!) giving what they want to see. If you are more of the casually interested in airplanes type, you may be one of those who prefer to be there Saturday, and not move from airshow center. The airshow does tend to be a little bigger Saturday. The warbirds show might be a little bigger than the one they do earlier, etc. As has been said, Sunday is not a good day unless you are into airplane shadows (the non-trampled grass left where an airplane was).

    If you are a pilot, interested in becoming one, interesting in homebuilding, or just generally spending time with airplane people, all of the suggestions above are good!

  4. #14

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    "
    I try to avoid the days that are mostly jet acts and jet teams due to the noise which is loud enough to damage hearing."

    Not kidding - I'm there for nine days and my Howard Leight banded earplugs are always at the ready.

  5. #15

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    As for Sunday, most years Ive probably flown home on Sun morning, but this year the weather was good and looked good for Mon so I stayed Sunday and went down to Osh and I m glad I did. There was still a lot to see, I went both the museum and the seaplane base, what a nice place to relax away from the noise and have a quiet lunch, they were still in full operation. I took a flight in the Ford Tri Motor and went through a couple of vendor hangars. In all it was a less crowded and enjoyable day, and I may do it again this year. I probably wouldn't come just for Sunday, but it was good if you were already there.

  6. #16
    Mayhemxpc's Avatar
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    I think that all of the suggestions so far are great. Especially the ones that advise you to wait until the schedule is out. Some thoughts:
    - Sun/Mon. Great idea of two days for the price of one. However, some of the best stuff doest arrive until later in the week. Also, for 2018, the vending areas an the central plaza were mostly closed to facilitate vendor set-up. I imagine it all be the same this year,
    - Wed/Thursday: If you want to see the night show, it is best to not have to concern yourself with the traffic jam leaving the area after the night show. In years past, jet day has been Thursday. If you want to see the jets, great. If you want to preserve your hearing, leave at the start of the airshow. You would have seen the airshow on Wed. anyway.

    As far as two days being enough, it is definitely NOT enough. BUT, my first visit was a day trip and I had a great time and lots of memories..especially flying in and out. My next visit, YEARS later, was 4 days. I thought it was long enough, but I just chose the wrong days. Third visit, with family, 4 days again. Decision: Stay the whole week. Every year since then...arrive on Saturday and stay until the next Saturday -- with Sunday as a rain day option.
    Chris Mayer
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  7. #17
    FlyingRon's Avatar
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    I'd do Wed/Thu or Sat/Sun so you could take in the night airshow.

  8. #18

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    There are a surprising number of folks on site the Saturday and Sunday pre-opening day.

    I predict that again the vendor areas will be off-limits those two days. Our tram system was running last year but not at full strength and with a re-route on the yellow. Vendors were given highest priority for road access, IMHO rightfully so. there is an unbelievable amount of logistical effort to create that city in just a few days and it IS fun to watch.

    There will be fully-staffed tram service starting Monday morning when the gates open.

  9. #19
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    The attempt to keep people out of the "vendor" area preshow last year was a confused nightmare.

    Still there's lots going on outside the vendor area before the show. There's a good number of people (at least down in Vintage) who arrive early, do Monday, and then leave Tuesday morning.

    Of course then there are people like us who arrive a week before the show and stay through the bitter end.

  10. #20
    rwanttaja's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FlyingRon View Post
    Of course then there are people like us who arrive a week before the show and stay through the bitter end.
    The term may be more appropriate than you realize.

    Most folks don't know the etymology of "the bitter end." Like many terms like this, it comes from the sailing ship days.

    Back in the days of sail, all the ropes on a ship were made of natural fibers. These fibers would, of course, tend to rot and fray in the working maritime environment.

    Prime victim, of course, were the anchor cables. They were immersed in sea water, submerged in mud, passing into and out of the ship through tight, sharply-angled fairleads that mechanically chafed the rope every time the anchor was dropped or raised. The ship side of the cable was wrapped and tied around a very solid structure in the bowels of the ship, called the "bitts."

    Ships would carry quite a bit of anchor rope, but typically only used a portion of it. Typically, the amount of cable used depended on the depth of water, and the sea conditions when anchored. Too little rope, and the anchor would tend to be hauled upward as the ship moved with the sea. Too much, and changing currents would cause the ship to swivel in a wide arc.

    There was really only one time when ALL the cable was used: Severe storms. They'd let it all out so the pull on the anchor was at the lowest possible angle. They'd let all the cable, out, leaving only that portion that was actually tied to the ship... the "bitter end."

    Sailors actually *liked* the bitter end. The bitter end had been well-protected through most of its life. It had been dry, it hadn't been in the mud, and, especially, it hadn't been chafed going into and out of the ship. So while the storms threatened...the bitter end gave them the best chance at survival.

    So I hate seeing the term used negatively. Here's to the "bitter end" volunteers at Oshkosh!


    Ron Wanttaja

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