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Thread: Bludgeoning

  1. #1

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    Bludgeoning

    Solidworks is beating me up, over and over and over again. Whenever I think I have found some traction it mocks me and bludgeons me some more. I am but a fruit juicy pulp, yet I try again!

  2. #2
    SOLIDWORKS Support Volunteer Jeffrey Meyer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blane.c View Post
    Solidworks is beating me up, over and over and over again. Whenever I think I have found some traction it mocks me and bludgeons me some more. I am but a fruit juicy pulp, yet I try again!
    Hi blane.c,

    Care to give us some specifics so that we can also become juicy pulp?

  3. #3

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    How do I draw flattened flange as in example attached?


    Name:  Float Flange Blow -up.jpg
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Size:  17.8 KB

  4. #4
    SOLIDWORKS Support Volunteer Jeffrey Meyer's Avatar
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    Do you want to generate the final bent geometry, or the flat pattern of the sheet before the bend?

    1. Flat Pattern:
    Make a simple straight-line bend as a regular sheet metal part - i.e. without the flattened segment.
    2. Final Geometry:
    Slightly more complex - I would try to build the part with several features - The first is an extruded "L" shape on the left, then a simple flat plate representing the flattened segment in the middle. Leave a gap the width of the transition feature between the L and this center segment. you can then build the transition segment as a lofted "boss" with face tangency constraints in the gap between the L and the center. You will probably have to split the edges of both the L and the center to give you better control of the loft. You may have to build this as several features as well. Thereafter you can probably "mirror" this loft to the right hand side of your part, and continue extruding the original L.
    Bear in mind that you are putting the flange through extreme plastic deformation and I suspect not many CAD systems can do this automatically. I certainly am not aware of any simple "formula" that could be applied here.

    Hope this helps.

    Jeffrey

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffrey Meyer View Post
    Do you want to generate the final bent geometry, or the flat pattern of the sheet before the bend?

    1. Flat Pattern:
    Make a simple straight-line bend as a regular sheet metal part - i.e. without the flattened segment.
    2. Final Geometry:
    Slightly more complex - I would try to build the part with several features - The first is an extruded "L" shape on the left, then a simple flat plate representing the flattened segment in the middle. Leave a gap the width of the transition feature between the L and this center segment. you can then build the transition segment as a lofted "boss" with face tangency constraints in the gap between the L and the center. You will probably have to split the edges of both the L and the center to give you better control of the loft. You may have to build this as several features as well. Thereafter you can probably "mirror" this loft to the right hand side of your part, and continue extruding the original L.
    Bear in mind that you are putting the flange through extreme plastic deformation and I suspect not many CAD systems can do this automatically. I certainly am not aware of any simple "formula" that could be applied here.

    Hope this helps.

    Jeffrey
    For now I have it drawn as a Base Flange with a flange added and then flattened. This gives the part the overall width needed and the bend lines are superimposed. Leaving it bent would cause difficulties adding other parts.

  6. #6
    SOLIDWORKS Support Volunteer Jeffrey Meyer's Avatar
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    Ok - nobody is forcing you to use the sheet metal module, so just model the final geometry with the fattened center section. Is my explanation of how to do so clear enough for you? (I made the assumption that the features I mentioned are familiar to you.)

    Jeffrey

  7. #7

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    Nope, I am not advanced enough to do your second suggestion. Time. I will look at it occasionally as I progress, eventually it will be more clear. Thank you. P.S. to bad no simple formula … dang.

  8. #8
    SOLIDWORKS Support Volunteer Jeffrey Meyer's Avatar
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    Hi again blane.c

    Herewith some screenshots of a part showing the technique.


    Name:  181208_bent_&_flattened_1.jpg
Views: 33
Size:  86.3 KBName:  181208_bent_&_flattened_2.jpg
Views: 34
Size:  86.7 KBName:  181208_bent_&_flattened_3.jpg
Views: 35
Size:  88.0 KB

    Jeffrey

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