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Thread: Understanding Light Sport Pilot Rules for EA-B Aircraft

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by FlyingRon View Post
    Most operating lims require not only the test period but a letter to the FSDO telling them what you did. I don't know what the FSDO does with that notification.
    This must be FSDO by FSDO, as none of the aircraft signed off by the Birmingham FDSO (that I'm aware of) require any sort of notification that the test period was completed.
    The opinions and statements of this poster are largely based on facts and portray a possible version of the actual events.

  2. #22
    FlyingRon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Giger View Post
    This must be FSDO by FSDO, as none of the aircraft signed off by the Birmingham FDSO (that I'm aware of) require any sort of notification that the test period was completed.
    I didn't say that "when the test period is completed." Most op specs (including the specimen one in the inspector's handbook) say you have to notify them WHEN YOU MAKE A MAJOR MODIFICATION and then do the flight test. Note you don't need their approval or to even wait for an acknowledgment, but you do have to tell them.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Floatsflyer View Post
    As just an interested observer here, do you think this is an anomaly or is the FAA or other regulatory bodies and the individuals connected to them apathetic, unconcerned or laissez-faire about E-AB things within the broader scope of all aircraft categories?
    I am also just an interested observer. But if it's an E-AB or E-LSA, I would not expect the FAA to have anything on file other than ownership changes, registration renewals, and the original airworthiness certificate. For s type certificated plane you'll see 337s and such, even annual inspections if it's old enough, but there is so little required for an Experimental... I would guess that most go their whole lives without the FAA ever seeing a shred of paperwork. I suspect even the majority of the few events that would supposedly require notifications very, very seldom see those notifications actually made. Just guessing.

    Now, as to your question... I decline to comment on the makeup of government agencies. Anyone who has dealt with them know it's a mixed bag.
    Measure twice, cut once...
    scratch head, shrug, shim to fit.

  4. #24

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    FlyingRon, apologies for misunderstanding.

    On the determination of whether or not a newly built plane is LSA compliant, there's a lot of honor system involved. Unless it's entirely uncredible on it's face, the FAA takes the word of the builder on max gross weight, cruising speed, etc.

    Heck, on the certified side, the published cruise speed of the FlightDesign CTLS is a bit, ah, creative, and it is entirely coincidental that the max gross weight is a perfect 1320, I'm sure.
    The opinions and statements of this poster are largely based on facts and portray a possible version of the actual events.

  5. #25
    rwanttaja's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Giger View Post
    Heck, on the certified side, the published cruise speed of the FlightDesign CTLS is a bit, ah, creative, and it is entirely coincidental that the max gross weight is a perfect 1320, I'm sure.
    And I seem to recall several kit aircraft showed a drop in advertised cruise speed, after Sport Pilot was implemented......

    Ron Wanttaja

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by rwanttaja View Post
    And I seem to recall several kit aircraft showed a drop in advertised cruise speed, after Sport Pilot was implemented......

    Ron Wanttaja
    Yup, easiest thing to fudge, extremely difficult if not impossible to police.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by rwanttaja View Post
    And I seem to recall several kit aircraft showed a drop in advertised cruise speed, after Sport Pilot was implemented......

    Ron Wanttaja

    Light-sport aircraft means an aircraft, other than a helicopter or powered-lift that, since its original certification, has continued to meet the following:
    (1) A maximum takeoff weight of not more than—
    (i) 1,320 pounds (600 kilograms) for aircraft not intended for operation on water; or
    (ii) 1,430 pounds (650 kilograms) for an aircraft intended for operation on water.
    (2) A maximum airspeed in level flight with maximum continuous power (VH) of not more than 120 knots CAS under standard atmospheric conditions at sea level.

    (3) A maximum never-exceed speed (VNE) of not more than 120 knots CAS for a glider.
    (4) A maximum stalling speed or minimum steady flight speed without the use of lift-enhancing devices (VS1) of not more than 45 knots CAS at the aircraft's maximum certificated takeoff weight and most critical center of gravity.
    (5) A maximum seating capacity of no more than two persons, including the pilot.
    (6) A single, reciprocating engine, if powered.
    (7) A fixed or ground-adjustable propeller if a powered aircraft other than a powered glider.
    (8) A fixed or feathering propeller system if a powered glider.
    (9) A fixed-pitch, semi-rigid, teetering, two-blade rotor system, if a gyroplane.
    (10) A nonpressurized cabin, if equipped with a cabin.
    (11) Fixed landing gear, except for an aircraft intended for operation on water or a glider.
    (12) Fixed or retractable landing gear, or a hull, for an aircraft intended for operation on water.
    (13) Fixed or retractable landing gear for a glider.

    VH means maximum speed in level flight with maximum continuous power.

    "advertised cruise speed" can be greater than 120 knots. Generally the advertised cruise speed is TAS at altitude not CAS at standard conditions. Engine RPM limits may be specified to limit Vh at standard conditions. Check the owners manual on Cessnas. There is a sea level rpm limit and and a higher llimit at 10,000 feet. Presumably there is a interpolated rpm limit between SL and 10,000 feet.

    There may be a difference between max power (takeoff, climb or emergency) and max continuous (cruise) power (rpm and manifold pressure).
    Last edited by jedi; 09-13-2018 at 05:58 AM.

  8. #28
    Dana's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Giger View Post
    FlyingRon, apologies for misunderstanding.

    On the determination of whether or not a newly built plane is LSA compliant, there's a lot of honor system involved. Unless it's entirely uncredible on it's face, the FAA takes the word of the builder on max gross weight, cruising speed, etc.

    Heck, on the certified side, the published cruise speed of the FlightDesign CTLS is a bit, ah, creative, and it is entirely coincidental that the max gross weight is a perfect 1320, I'm sure.
    Not coincidental at all; a manufacturer is free to specify the max gross weight at anything they choose (and test). It's not unusual to see the exact same plane sold in Europe with a higher gross weight. Create a new "LS" model with a lower gross weight and you have access to the US market. Totally legal.

    Similar with the max speed, the manufacturer can specify whatever max continuous rpm they want to limit the max speed. It doesn't matter whether the engine is physically able to run faster as long as the legal limit keeps it within LSA specs.

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