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Thread: Learning to fly, is this a recipe for disaster?

  1. #21

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Fort Vermilion Alberta
    Posts
    162
    Astonishing, I taught a friend to fly, ultralight in Canada. He has flown over 100 hours and now is taking training for his private. They are telling him he has to do 17 hrs before he can solo. He's learning in an old spam can. They did 8 spins on one flight. WTF.
    Unfortunately in our neck of the woods training is hard to find.
    This is why I am in the ultralight world and own an OM aircraft.
    I don't mind bragging a little, in Canada we have a much less restrictive environment to fly in.
    And apparently we have lots of aluminum.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Clarklake, MI
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    2,244
    Quote Originally Posted by raytoews View Post
    in Canada we have a much less restrictive environment to fly in.
    How so?

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,487
    I think raytoews doesn't mean to use the words "less restrictive" in the regulatory sense to describe the overall GA environment in Canada. We are subject to as many rules and regs as you are in the US.

    I think what he means is that Transport Canada(TC) is a much more benign overseer of private GA and therefore far less intrusive than the FAA in the lives of it's pilots and aircraft owners. Unlike the FAA, TC does not seem to spend it's time dreaming up new roadblocks that undermine our freedom to fly. TC concentrates more on commercial than private aviation.

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    2,207
    Raytoews, does Canada require spins to get a private license? I would be surprised by that. it is not required in the U S. I think spin training is important, actually to recognize and avoid getting close to a spin, and if you do, to recover promptly and fully. An average pilot in a Cessna may never spin one, but if you are going to fly a T-6 or acro planes you need that training. I asked my CFI to do spin training and he did, we did it in a Piper Tomahawk, and I was novice enough that we didnt have parachutes, and yes it sure will spin but recovered as it was supposed to, opposite rudder and let go of back pressure to stop the spin. I think we did one each way. I would be really surprised if a CFI did 8 spins in one lesson, I think 2 or 3 would risk airsickness and is unlikfley to be needed to do 8 for a private lesson. I think your friend might be pulling your leg on that report, but I dont know Canada regs and procedures.

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    898
    The Canadian Ultralight rules are less restrictive (to me) I wish the FAA would issue a blanket exemption option for Americans to use the Canadian Ultralight rules.

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    2,025
    They can also take a certified aircraft into another category that is much less restrictive to maintenance.

    On spin training, I'm with Bill. Heck, I'm a lowly Sport Pilot and went through spin training; I figured the first time I went into a spin it would be best to have a trained instructor along for the ride.
    The opinions and statements of this poster are largely based on facts and portray a possible version of the actual events.

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