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Thread: Instruments for Home Built

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Auburntsts View Post
    Sigh. Yeah NEXGEN will save us all. Meanwhile I’ll just keep motoring along. The thing of it is I navigate 99% by IFR GPS but I have the skills to navigate without it and I do practice those skills. I also fly behind a 100% glass instrument panel and use an iPad based EFB for all my charts and pubs.

    Best to learn how to fly in today’s airspace using today’s equipment and procedures and not put a lot of stock into what iffing the future. If you end up building then you can worry about that kind of stuff once you get to the point where you are ready to purchase avionics.
    Trust me, I am learning the old way to navigate. I may someday get my IPad app but I do Not plan to do before I get the basics under my belt.
    Last edited by wmgeorge; 05-11-2018 at 11:27 AM.

  2. #22
    Sam Buchanan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wmgeorge View Post
    Went out to our local airport flying service this morning to pick up a sectional map, and a young pilot was standing there. Turns out he was CFI and he said there a big changes coming from the FAA in the next few years regarding GPS and navigation in general and not to believe everything you read online.
    Not only don't believe everything you read online, but don't believe everything a CFI tells you!
    Sam Buchanan
    EAA Technical Counselor
    The RV Journal RV-6 build log
    Fokker D.VII semi-replica build log
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  3. #23
    Auburntsts's Avatar
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    Nothing wrong with going paperless from the get go in my book. The beauty of using a EFB (ForeFlight, GarminPilot, etc) is you can have all the charts, supplements and flight planning tools right at your fingertips and not have to work to keep them all current. I will never go back to paper.
    Todd Stovall
    PP ASEL - IA
    RV-10 N728TT - Flying
    My builder's log (which is woefully out of date): www.mykitlog.com/auburntsts
    WAR DAMN EAGLE!

  4. #24

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    Apr 2018
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    So the "new" system will be using GPS location and altitude? Looks interesting > https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...SIFSSB0X&psc=1


    Wow, and did you read the Reviews on Amazon? Seems GPS Is good enough for the FAA.
    Last edited by wmgeorge; 05-11-2018 at 01:14 PM.

  5. #25
    rwanttaja's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Buchanan View Post
    Not only don't believe everything you read online, but don't believe everything a CFI tells you!
    I don't believe that. :-)

    Ron "Murphy was right" Wanttaja

  6. #26
    Auburntsts's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wmgeorge View Post
    So the "new" system will be using GPS location and altitude? Looks interesting > https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...SIFSSB0X&psc=1
    Thats not really new. The 2020 mandate for ADS-B “out” has been published for years. I installed both ADS-B out and in on my plane as part of its build. Folks have been using Stratux like ADS-B in receivers for cockpit traffic and weather for years now too.
    Todd Stovall
    PP ASEL - IA
    RV-10 N728TT - Flying
    My builder's log (which is woefully out of date): www.mykitlog.com/auburntsts
    WAR DAMN EAGLE!

  7. #27

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    Apr 2018
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    BTW you did a beautiful job on your build!!

  8. #28

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    He really did.

    I'm of the mind that students should be taught to navigate using Ye Olde Sectional, including both flight planning and in-air navigation. It's not that one shouldn't use modern technology, it's that the principles and ideas that drive those tools should be fully understood.

    Much like the E6B, it's not that pilots are truly expected to use them routinely, but we learn it to understand relationships between different factors of flight.*

    * Feel free to now tell me how you use the whiz wheel all the time, including during flight, to calculate everything from fuel burn to crosswind components - and I'll laugh, as you'd be a severe outlier in aviation.
    The opinions and statements of this poster are largely based on facts and portray a possible version of the actual events.

  9. #29

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    Apr 2018
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    Frank I agree 100%, I am 74 years old and I have learned things a bit more complicated than flying a plane in my life. And after semi retiring I went on to teach and head a program at our local community college. It may take me a bit longer to learn these days but so what? I can use a computer better than my grand daughters, design in Fusion 360, run my CNC machines and 3D printer build stuff in my home machine/fab shop and so on. Not ready for the retirement village yet! Yet I did just sell my off road dune buggy, making room for maybe a air craft build??

  10. #30

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    Oct 2011
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    I think the right answer is that everybody is using indicated altitude adjusted for barometric pressure. Unlike true altitude which is adjusted for both temperature and pressure. So if you want to fly at the same altitude as other aircraft, the best thing is to use the same type of altitude measurement as they are.

    Lots of misconceptions about GPS altitude. As noted above it is the distance above a spheroid (mathematical model of the earth). It differs from ground elevation which is based on a geoid, the lumps and bumps on the earth caused by masses (mountains) and lack or masses (valleys). When you setup your spirit level next to a mountain, the mass of the mountain pulls the bubble off level. Same phenomena happens next to a large valley. Not to worry, the government knows about this and elevations shown on the airport diagram are based on this geoid. So if your GPS elevation differs from what the sign at the airport says it's could be the difference between the geoid (lumpy) and the spheroid (perfect), plus a little error in the GPS measurements. If you have a WAAS signal, the errors are probably less than five feet.

    So when you set your altimeter to the barometric pressure broadcast at the airport you should see the elevation of the airport. Keep in mind the elevation is based on the geoid.

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