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Thread: "If you can't make the field, you're too low."

  1. #11
    rwanttaja's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Buchanan View Post
    High drag aircraft such as what Frank and I have don't require power for a smooth landing following a steep glide, but they do require very precise speed management and timing. It takes discipline and a lot of practice to keep the nose pointed at the ground until you are practically on the runway before breaking the glide and greasing the landing.
    I descend until I see the ants cringe. Then I pull back.

    Ron "Why are my gear legs poking through the wings?" Wanttaja

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by S3flyer View Post
    +1 to normally yes. My normal pattern keeps me within gliding distance of the runway. I pull power to idle when abeam the numbers on downwind then 'glide' through base and final to touchdown on the numbers. I consider it a 'failure' if I have to add power due to miscalculating winds, etc.
    This is a very effective technique for landing an LSA. Most, due to light weight, have a very good glide ratio. On short final, slip if too high, add power if too low.

  3. #13
    Sam Buchanan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Buchanan View Post
    High drag aircraft such as what Frank and I have don't require power for a smooth landing following a steep glide, but they do require very precise speed management and timing. It takes discipline and a lot of practice to keep the nose pointed at the ground until you are practically on the runway before breaking the glide and greasing the landing. You only get one chance for the smooth landing before airspeed decays. Carrying just a little power vastly increases the size of the airspeed target and makes landings much less.....exciting.
    A bounce occurs when the plane is flared too high and airspeed and inspiration are depleted at the same time.
    Quote Originally Posted by rwanttaja View Post
    I descend until I see the ants cringe. Then I pull back.

    Ron "Why are my gear legs poking through the wings?" Wanttaja
    Yep, that's what I'm talkin' about!

    P.S. Ron, sorry to hear about the challenges in your corner of the community, you are a valuable resource.
    Last edited by Sam Buchanan; 04-27-2018 at 03:31 PM.
    Sam Buchanan
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  4. #14
    rwanttaja's Avatar
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    I always come in high, just in case, and get rid of the excess altitude in a slip.

    This is yesterday's example, with just a little slip


    Ron "Thanks, Sam" Wanttaja

  5. #15

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    And in the fairness of opposing views, here's how NOT to do that!

    (Skip ahead 50 seconds)





    [edit] The gun is "noodling" due to the anti-shake processing I did to the video.
    Last edited by Frank Giger; 04-28-2018 at 09:47 AM.
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  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Giger View Post
    And in the fairness of opposing views, here's how NOT to do that!
    I like it. Gave that asphalt a whippin' "Take that runway.....and that, and that too!"

  7. #17

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    If at first you don't succeed, bounce, bounce again.
    The opinions and statements of this poster are largely based on facts and portray a possible version of the actual events.

  8. #18
    rwanttaja's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Giger View Post
    The gun is "noodling" due to the anti-shake processing I did to the video.
    I notice your video has none of the "jellying" (distant objects forming in waves) that mine do. What's your secret?

    Ron Wanttaja

  9. #19

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    It's all about placement; the "jelly roll" is usually caused by vibrations, particularly where the camera is moving forwards and backwards.

    That and it's a GoPro 3 Silver.

    However, my el cheapo camera, when mounted high on a strut, didn't jelly. Lower down it did, though.
    The opinions and statements of this poster are largely based on facts and portray a possible version of the actual events.

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