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Thread: RV 7A Maintenance

  1. #11

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    Frank, yes, I be an A&P, but been working with all types of "homebuilt" planes for years. Be as specific as you want.I can handle it. RV 7A i am working now will be done right.

  2. #12
    Sam Buchanan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Giger View Post
    Very gently I'm going to differ from your statement, Sam, as it was too specific, and we're speaking to an A&P.

    The build instructions for any aircraft are in fact recommendations - very serious ones - but the builder is free to deviate from them as they wish. The wisdom of this is usually suspect, but it's the truth of the matter. And the FAA couldn't care less if the builder did so.*

    Likewise, Service Bulletins aren't binding in Experimental Aircraft like AD's are in certified one.

    Again, one would be foolish to disregard them, but there is nothing compelling a builder/owner from following them.

    * Naturally, if one is building an E-LSA, then everything has to be the same to obtain and keep the category.
    I am cognizant of how FARs apply to aircraft with an Experimental Airworthiness Certificate. But the documents I referenced should be considered essential by any A&P (or non-builder owner) who needs RV documentation in the course of either a thorough Condition Inspection or repairs.

    RV aircraft have 35 years of highly engineered design and maintenance baked into their documentation that will address any question raised in regard to care and feeding of these planes. The RV documentation is thorough enough to make an A&P who is accustomed to the certificated paper trail feel comfortable when performing maintenance.
    Last edited by Sam Buchanan; 04-06-2018 at 06:02 PM.
    Sam Buchanan
    EAA Technical Counselor
    The RV Journal RV-6 build log
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  3. #13

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    I'm not disagreeing with you, just trying to clarify, Sam!

    Skyfixer has dealt with Experimentals, so he knows a service bulletin isn't an AD, and therefore shouldn't necessarily stop a Condition Inspection.

    What we obviously don't know is the quality of the build or the owner. The aircraft could have been meticulously assembled by the plans, and the owner a stickler for ensuring that all Bulletins are applied.

    I've had an A&P look at my aircraft and almost recoil in horror over pop rivets, non-aviation hardware, and other features of my aircraft. It was actually kind of fun. I thought he was going to faint when I pointed out that the single ignition system on the VW engine is driven by Harley Davidson motorcycle parts. He shook his head and walked away when I mentioned that the fuel bobber wire was actually a piece of straightened out coat hangar.

    OTOH, I know of a certified aircraft that, when it passes on to someone else's ownership, is going to need to be basically stripped down and rebuilt for all the *cough* casual maintenance performed by the owner.
    The opinions and statements of this poster are largely based on facts and portray a possible version of the actual events.

  4. #14
    Sam Buchanan's Avatar
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    Skyfixer asked for technical info so he could complete some work on a RV-7A. The intent of my post was to point him toward a comprehensive and valuable resource that would assist with the inspection and maintenance, I hope he (and the RV-7A owner) found the links useful.
    Sam Buchanan
    EAA Technical Counselor
    The RV Journal RV-6 build log
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  5. #15

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    You probably are already aware being an A&P, but if you use an engine hoist, lift via the engine mount, not the engine. I would guess that its easier to pull the tail down with the aft tie-down though. I built an RV with a more proper gear configuration (tailwheel)

    Also, the threaded portions in the wing are not true jack points. They are the wing tie-downs. Only implication is that there is no additional skin thickness around them. The structure the tiedown or jack point goes into is directly attached to the wing spar, but there is a gap between the tiedown and the skin. Van's has suggested that these are the best locations for jacking.

    A search on google will find you many methods to use the tie-down as a jack point. A bolt works fine if you have large aircraft jacks with a cupped piston.

  6. #16
    DaleB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Giger View Post
    * Naturally, if one is building an E-LSA, then everything has to be the same to obtain and keep the category.
    I'm going to equally gently differ with you here, Frank. At least the "and keep" part. An E-LSA only has to conform at the time the airworthiness certificate is issued. After that, anything that does not take the airplane outside of LSA limits is fair game.
    Measure twice, cut once...
    scratch head, shrug, shim to fit.

  7. #17
    EAA Staff Joda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaleB View Post
    An E-LSA only has to conform at the time the airworthiness certificate is issued. After that, anything that does not take the airplane outside of LSA limits is fair game.
    You are correct Dale. An ELSA must be kept within the definition of LSA as called out in 14 CFR Part 1.1. But it does NOT have to be kept strictly in compliance with kit manufacturer recommendations. Only an SLSA is required to completely comply with manufacturer specifications and recommendations. This is the reason many SLSAs get converted to ELSA, so that the owner can install equipment without manufacturer approval.
    Cheers!

    Joe

  8. #18

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    LOL, I got my LSA's mixed - thanks for the correction!
    The opinions and statements of this poster are largely based on facts and portray a possible version of the actual events.

  9. #19

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    Okay, RV owners. How long does it usually take for your plane to go through a condition inspection. The RV 7A i have in my shop is turning into a PITA. Example, had to pull all cylinders because of cracks, and other problems , and the original builder had riveted all baffles to the engine with cherry max. Spent most of the morning drilling them out so I could get the cylinders off. Besides other headaches from the original builder, going smooth, but just wondering how long the average no fix inspection usually takes. First time on an RV here.

    Bill L

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by skyfixer8 View Post
    Okay, RV owners. How long does it usually take for your plane to go through a condition inspection. The RV 7A i have in my shop is turning into a PITA. Example, had to pull all cylinders because of cracks, and other problems , and the original builder had riveted all baffles to the engine with cherry max. Spent most of the morning drilling them out so I could get the cylinders off. Besides other headaches from the original builder, going smooth, but just wondering how long the average no fix inspection usually takes. First time on an RV here.
    RV-7's have a zillion screws and take about 2 - 4 hours to take apart, and another 2 - 4 hours to put together, assuming you can get everything to line up. That doesn't include the time to actually look at everything, but you do get to look at a lot while unscrewing it. I figure on 10 - 16 hours, including paperwork, logbook review, write-up, and the actual eyeballing everything. If the owner actually wants work done on the plane (oil change, tire change, brake pads, brake fluid, whatever) then obviously add that time in too.

    My $0.02.

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