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Thread: Airdrome Aeroplanes Nieuport 17

  1. #121
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    Trailing edge fairings started. I decided to go with 2 piece top and bottom.

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    Dale Cavin
    Florida Panhandle

  2. #122
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    The top side aileron gap fairing is complete (right wing)

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    I still have to figure out how to attach a mounting bracket for the upper rear V strut to the 2" round rear spar. There is a lot going on there with the through bolt for the compression strut, anti drag cable fitting and landing wire fitting. Plus I am not keen on drilling any more holes in the spar at this location.

    The kit is designed to attach the strut to the compression strut, but this causes the strut to angle forward. It should be vertical and attach to the rear spar.

    Any thoughts?

    Dale
    Dale Cavin
    Florida Panhandle

  3. #123

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    My plans are different here, if you're referring to the inter-wing struts (V Strut).

    The front and rear strut gussets go around the compression tubes, a close to the spar as can be allowed. This lets one get a grip into the cups that hold the compression tubes. Yes, there's a lot going on, and one has to plan on where the bolt goes in versus the nut when assembling it, but it's not difficult with the wing uncovered.
    The opinions and statements of this poster are largely based on facts and portray a possible version of the actual events.

  4. #124
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    Frank, my plans are the same as yours. However, attaching the rear V strut to the compression strut causes to lean forward at the top. Is should be vertical.

    The strut should be mounted under the rear spare to get it in proper position. That's what I am working on. Had I come to the conclusion to tie the mount to the rear compression strut bolt and under the spar in the beginning, it would be a simple matter to add it as the wing core is being constructed. But now is a totally different story.

    Since my last post here, I have figured out the solution. Cut the compression strut in 2 to allow it to be slid off the plugs at the ends. It isn't riveted at the ends yet. Then the rear bolt can be removed, V strut bracket attached and bolt reinserted.

    This results in the compression strut needing to be shorter by the thickness of the added bracket - ~.065 planned, the compression strut sleeved to "repair" the splice and the anti drag cable that attaches to that bolt, shortened. I called Robert Baslee about this whole process and he was good with the plan with a couple of suggestions including adding a turn buckle to the anti drag cable to take care of the length difference. I could just replace that cable and tension it as was originally done, but I have some extra turnbuckles.

    I am in the process of designing the V strut bracket. I will post photos when I get that done.

    Dale
    Dale Cavin
    Florida Panhandle

  5. #125

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    So Robert's "try to get it as vertical as you can, but it might be a little off, that's okay" standards of quality were not to your liking?

    The funny thing is mine looked to be more than a little off of vertical until I put her in rig; then they went pretty much dead on the money.

    I think this is why he makes and installs them with the wings in situ with wires strung - "show about two or three threads on the turnbuckles" - as then he can eyeball them.

    Before getting too involved, it might be worth a shot to mount the top and bottom wings with some wires to see where the inter-plane struts actually line up.

    Okay, so you've been to Gardner and see how wings can be hung with a crew of folks that either have done it a bunch of times or have helpers that can take directions and understand the concept. This is how one does it by themselves:

    You'll need two long and two shortish ropes or straps, a way to suspend them about four inches above your head at the ends of the upper wing,* a step ladder, six or eight little spirit levels, some double sided tape, a table or something to lift the tail to flying position, and a non-rolling standard chair.

    For the back yard I built two rectangular boxes out of 2x4's (the ones I put under my MDF sheets over sawhorses for my build tables); in the hangar I used roof beams.

    Back the plane away from the wings, but pointing at them. Put the top wings together, including bolts in the rear. If you haven't drilled the rear cabane yet, a bolt to each side of it in either the blade or insert you made.

    Lift one end of the wing and put it on the back of the chair to get it off the ground. Make a loop on one end of the rope so you can cinch it up as you raise, and put around the wing about three feet in, loose. Put the rope on the down end, too.

    Lift the down end side of the wing to about chest high. The wing is going to sag a little in the middle. Don't stress, it's okay; we're not going to have it that way for long. Cinch the rope right here.

    Go to the chair end. Lift it about chin high. Cinch the rope. Try and keep the wing as level as you can.

    Now go to the other end and lift it about arm high, and cinch. If you're like me, this means by the time you tie your knot it's much lower than that. Do the same on the other end.

    Walking it up like that keeps the sway in the middle from looking crazy and making you pop sweat regardless of ambient temperature.

    Roll (or carry) the airplane under the center of the wing, lifting the tail to about flying position. Here's the fun part. Front cabanes first. I found it was easier to maneuver the plane around to them than worry about the wing.

    When it's about in the right spot, put something under the tail to get it into flying position. I used an old folding card table. Chock the wheels!

    The longeron midway through the cockpit is a good datum spot for level along the length of the plane. Put 2x4 scrap or stuff under the tailwheel until it's level.

    Since you're not using a VW, you may not have a nice bar across the front between the top two longerons at the firewall. A nice piece of straight lumber will do the trick on top of the mounting bolts. Put a couple of those little levels on the board. This is your datum point for horizontal level. If you haven't installed bungees or gear yet, thin bits of plywood under one side or the other under the gear works good. If you have the wheels installed, letting out some air on one of the tires works well.

    Have a good selection of profanity ready in your mind, as now you need to lower the wing so that the front cabanes meet the compression strut. You're going to be gently lowering the wing tip ropes, trying to put a two inch cabane onto a two inch compression tube. It helps if the front of the wing is a little lower than the back. I know you have the sexy improved cabanes, but this part is kind of like a carnival side show game no matter what the rig is, at least for the first time. Time number four and it's a no brainer. This is also where that step ladder comes into play, as it's easier to hold and adjust the ropes if you're up a step or two.

    One the front is in, lower the ropes a tad so that the rear spar is on the cabane, if it isn't already.

    If the wing isn't perpendicular to the fuselage, move the fuselage to the wing. You want the wing to be floating as naturally as possible, with no forced twisting between the cabanes and the ropes. It took me a minute or two to realize that if things weren't lining up right, moving the tail left or right was the solution. If you move the fuselage at all, check level.

    Remember that double sided tape? Put some on the rest of your little Harbor Freight levels, and stick them to the upper wing at the outer compression strut and along the front spar. Or, since you've got the leading edge on, the rear spar. doesn't matter. You could just walk around checking, but I found it was tedious this way and very helpful to have them in place.

    Dick around with the ropes until the top wing is level all the way across.

    Tada!

    Take one of your shorter ropes, make a loop around it, feed the free end through it around the outer compression strut on the top wing, letting it hang free. This will be our interplane strut stand in for the moment.

    Mount the lower wing. Another state fair side show challenge getting both spars to go over the mounts on the fuselage, but we had a large selections of profanities prepared for a reason! Rope goes under the lower wing's compression strut, back up over the upper wing compression strut, looped and tied to where it makes a V.

    You may need to put the back of the chair under the lower wing tip to hold it somewhat in place as you tie the rope.

    Do the same for the other side.

    Now the wings are in position for inter-plane strut fitting and, if you haven't done so, cabane drilling in a hands-free manner. Check all the levels, natually.

    * While my airplane is 7/8ths scale to yours, I'm also 7/8ths scale as well, getting ramped up to your height comparatively.
    The opinions and statements of this poster are largely based on facts and portray a possible version of the actual events.

  6. #126
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    My rigging jigs. The fuselage is in the proper position for the spars to be level. It is level left and right.

    Once I get the upper wings back mounted, I can take final measurements for the V struts. When those are mounted, the cables can be attached and adjusted.

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    Dale Cavin
    Florida Panhandle

  7. #127
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    As for the rear V strut, you are right "close enough" didn't cut it for me. The rear strut on the full size AA N17 comes out with a significant angle forward if built by the plan.

    Dale
    Dale Cavin
    Florida Panhandle

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