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Thread: C150 H stab attach

  1. #1

    Join Date
    May 2012
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    79

    C150 H stab attach

    Have a C150G (1967) where the H stab rear attachment to the fuselage has slightly worn bolt holes which cause stabilizer movement when pressure is applied to the stab tips. Anyone know of a unique repair for this problem other than major parts replacement ? C150 bulletins do not cover this problem.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Wachapreague Va.
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    237
    I would think you would have to replace the rear bulkhead and attach brackets. Should not be that hard to do.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    Clarklake, MI
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    2,226
    I think there is a service bulletin that covers inspection of horizontal stab attach fittings, spar flange and reinforcement boxes on all 100 series. Any play or movement in that area should be investigated immediately. It will be simple replacement of worn parts unless the horizontal stab spar flange is cracked. If that's the case it turns into a bigger job.

    The doubler plates on the fuselage to which the fittings attach rarely give any problems.

  4. #4
    Dana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    682
    Generally it's permissible to drill out the holes for the next larger size bolt, if that hasn't already been done, but of course you have to look and see if the damage was caused by, or has caused, any other damage. Fittings are always supposed to be designed with that in mind, but you might check with Cessna to verify it's OK in this situation.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Barrington, IL
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    111
    This is not something that an owner is allowed to perform. Get with your mechanic and read the following special airworthiness information bulletin:

    http://rgl.faa.gov/Regulatory_and_Gu...2?OpenDocument

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    New Hampshire
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    1,221
    The type of problem described is usually just the tip of the iceberg. Unfortunately, surveying the extent of the wear and whether there are more problems lurking inside generally requires taking more stuff apart. The service bulletins referenced are likely more comprehensive than is required for your "average" old Cessna, but you can't know until you dig deep enough to stop finding problems in the assembly. You just have to grit your teeth and have your friendly neighborhood A&P start working on it. If you have worked with your A&P enough, you can disassemble under supervision to see how big the problem is. With enough previous experience and a good relationship, your A&P might have you bolt it all back together after the problem parts are repaired/replaced.

    Best of luck,

    Wes

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