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Thread: Any suggestions for possible CH-750 builder?

  1. #1
    Low and slow's Avatar
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    Any suggestions for possible CH-750 builder?

    Last year I built a new home, next year (2012) I'm building a hanger and in 2013 I hope to build a Zenith CH-750 to put in the hanger. Do any of you have any experience, suggestions, cautions to offer about the CH-750? I'll also be looking for engine advice, hoping to do this for as low cost as possible, so am considering the new Viking Honda engine.
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Max Torque's Avatar
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    Nice airplane, but I would go with a Corvair engine from William Wynne for a powerplant: http://www.flycorvair.com/750.html
    Tom
    "You have to be alive to spend it..."

  3. #3

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    Engine

    Quote Originally Posted by Low and slow View Post
    Last year I built a new home, next year (2012) I'm building a hanger and in 2013 I hope to build a Zenith CH-750 to put in the hanger. Do any of you have any experience, suggestions, cautions to offer about the CH-750? I'll also be looking for engine advice, hoping to do this for as low cost as possible, so am considering the new Viking Honda engine.
    Thanks.
    Wynne's done a great job. But who can argue with 1000's of spot on Honda FIT block cores and parts off the shelf available for years and years to come?

    It's so personal to choose a powerplant. There are already planes with 500 trouble free hours of flight with the Viking. That's 5 years worth of flying for most people, no matter how enthusiastic we might feel. You have enough time to make a choice that there will be many more hours flown with the Viking to help you decide about any longevity questions. As you undoubtedly know, Jan at Viking says it's important to use the 3 blade prop he recommends as it has the least vibration of all. If you don't like a 3 blade, that's a consideration. I personally would like to build a CH-750 one day, and have enough torque for practical float use with passenger. I think the Viking can do that for $12K and change re 24K for 'others'. My and my passengers lives are, of course, worth more than $12K, but every day/hour of flight with Vikings causes the risk to melt away. A Searey has made a number of flights this month, all successful. Sonex is next. Viking was invited to Mexico, MO for the last open house as a presenter.

    I'm frothing...again, it's personal after lots and lots of investigation.

    Other than that, be sure to make a smart and well considered transition into a high drag/high lift floaty plane like a -750. I hear that a 'regular' pilot can use up the runway in ground effect, or if attempting a stall landing (for some unknown reason?) has been very surprised when the plane, not just a -750, but any of its type, stops flying a bit further from the runway than one would like. All can be overcome, in my opinion, by good training.

    Best to you and your decision/build,

    Jackson

  4. #4

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    Hello...from mid-coast ME,
    I just joined here yesterday and just noticed this thread. The Zeniths are one of the best. A couple of years ago I picked up some plans and tail kit but haven't had the time to really dig in and build. Being a diehard Chevy person,Waynes corvair conversions are very interesting. Honda products have a great reputation too. It depends on what your drawn to. It's neat to see folks from maine here.....as I haven't come across very many builders in my travels around. Randy

  5. #5
    Low and slow's Avatar
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    Thanks to all of you for the replies, especially to Jackson for the heads up on training to fly a CH-750. I'm a 300 hour pilot with 250 in a C-172, 25 in a C-150 and 25 in a RANS S-12. I always landed my C-172 with stall horn blaring and would fly my Rans literally onto the ground with half throttle. All three planes flew similar except the Rans was not heavy enough to glide to touchdown so half throttle was necessary to avoid a stall.

    I was planning some training time in a CH-750 before I plunked down any money. With my limited experience and your comment, I think I'll do that sooner than later in the event I decide it is not the plane for me. Any other comments about CH-750 flying characteristics are welcome.
    Thanks again.

  6. #6
    Take a look at the Skykits Savannah VGW before you make a final purchase decision. I have the older Savannah VG and it is an excellent airplane. Note especially the quick build time.
    Ralph

  7. #7
    Max Torque's Avatar
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    The Viking looks like a nice engine and I sincerely hope they are successful and wish them success. BTW - What happened to the Eggenfellner Subaru engine anyway? I am curious just how many Vikings are out there flying? How many actually have over 1,000 hours on them? There are hundreds of Corvairs flying around, some of them have been flying for decades, and many of those have over 1,000 hours on them. Parts are a non-issue as there were millions of Corvairs manufactured and original/new spare parts are readily available.

    I have been an avid experimenter and follower of auto engine conversions for twenty years or so (have done a Corvair - no problems but going to re-do it now with the top of the line stuff from William Wynne which wasn't available when I did mine), and for my money, a William Wynne Corvair is the way to go for a 100 - 125 hp engine. The Viking looks viable and I really hope they work out. I'm looking forward to the day when a few of their engines have a thousand hours or so successful hours of history behind them.

    It's interesting that Viking lists the Corvair weight as 267 which is over 30 lbs heavier than what today's builders who have actually weighed their engines - all up ready to fly - have reported.

    Whichever engine and airframe you decide on, for a propeller, take a look at the Lipps design or the Whirlwind RV series propeller http://www.whirlwindaviation.com/props/rvseries.asp . According to Jack Norris http://www.propellersexplained.com/ , Whirlwind designed the propeller they way a propeller should be ("They get it."). The props designed by the late Paul Lipps (his son is taking over and carrying on from what I understand) make a lot of sense and are also flight proven.

    Here's to success!

    Tom
    "You have to be alive to spend it..."

  8. #8

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    Am working on a 750 and hope to have it flying next spring. The plane has been a joy to assemble but I also have to consider a tight budget. My suggestions include that it is a very special plane with very specific capabilities which one should enjoy. Try not to make it do things that it was not designed to do and qualify yourself to fly this plane with its characteristics. Regarding suggestions for engines, I am of the group that prefers aircraft engines, not automotive, snowmobile, or chainsaw. Many proven aircraft engines with considerable time remaining show up on the market and can be had for a fraction of the cost of those other engines of lesser reliability. With some effort you will find a good used Continental, Lycoming, or in my case, a Franklin. Also since this airplane is low and slow with short take off and landing qualities not cross country capabilities, I suggest that you use simple steam gauges rather than the high dollar glass panels shown in the demo birds. Have fun with this simple LSA bird and then build a 650 with all the glass for your cross country adventures. But use the aircraft engine on the 650 also.

  9. #9
    Low and slow's Avatar
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    Motorles,
    I've sent you a private message with my email address in order for me to learn more about what I may be getting myself into. I look forward to hearing from you.
    Thanks.

  10. #10

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    I am finishing one now and it has been a great project. I went with the Jabiru 3300 and hope it will be a good choice. I took the engine school at Jabiru and would recommend that to anyone. Make sure you use the online builder's site.

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