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Thread: Buying a Stolp Starduster Too

  1. #1

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    Buying a Stolp Starduster Too

    Hello All,
    I am looking for some help. I am interested in buying a Stolp Starduster Too and would like any insight for things to look for during the pre-buy inspection and later during the condition inspection. Pretend I know nothing about pre-buy and condition inspections and nothing about the Starduster. Any help would be appreciated. It has a Lycoming 180HP fixed pitch prop.
    Thanks,
    Dan

  2. #2

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    when was it built and how many hrs has it flown?

  3. #3
    rwanttaja's Avatar
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    You'd like a pre-buy inspection of the same basic scope of detail as the yearly condition inspection. Your A&P doesn't need to open EVERY inspection panel, but should open enough to gain insight into how well the airplane was built, and how well it's aging.

    Remember, you'll need to GET a condition inspection within the next year, after you buy the airplane. Pay more up front so you have fewer surprises when it's your financial liability.

    The single most expensive component on that airplane is the engine, so the A&P should spend most of their time forward of the firewall. Compression test as a minimum, examine the exhaust system, engine mounts, fuel components, etc.

    Every type of aircraft have aspects that might wear abnormally or cause maintenance problems. You need to get involved with people who have actually owned Stardusters, and get their advice. The Biplane Forum has a Starduster sub-forum, I suggest you join (it's free) and ask the same question there. The folks there probably can point you to other resources as well.

    Ron Wanttaja

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by martymayes View Post
    when was it built and how many hrs has it flown?
    199 hours built (I guess completed) in 2002.

  5. #5
    Dana's Avatar
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    Definitely post your questions on the Biplane Forum. Dave Baxter, the Starduster guru, hangs out there, and he probably even knows the history of the specific plane you're looking at.

    No serious gotchas, though, it's a fairly conventional design, wood wings and steel tube fuselage.
    Last edited by Dana; 01-11-2018 at 07:03 PM.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by dbegeman View Post
    199 hours built (I guess completed) in 2002.
    Average = 13 hrs per yr. (not out of the ordinary for that type plane). That should help you set up an eval checklist.

    Most of what needs to be checked to see if the value is equal to the selling price can be done with simple visual inspection.

  7. #7

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    The EAA has some pretty good information on just what your looking for. Go to the EAA homepage, open the Education & Resources tab on the top of the page, open the Videos tab on the left side of that page and do a search for "BUY". You'll find multiple videos about buying Amateur Built Aircraft. I'm guessing it will take you several hours to watch them. That may sound like a lot of time so you'll have to determine how valuable your time is. The information could save you thousands of dollars and months of frustrating wasted time.

    If it were me, I would ignore the time since the last condition inspection and have a new inspection done by someone that does not know the seller and has never worked on the plane. Negotiate your deal with the seller making sure he discloses all deficiencies he knows of. Find a competent A&P or better yet, IA that will perform the inspection & is prepared to sign off the aircraft as airworthy in the log books. Have only the inspection done. If any deficiencies are found that is the time to decide if you want to re-negotiate with the seller. If something is required that costs a few bucks to correct you might want to pay for it yourself. If something is found that will cost hundreds or thousands to correct either the seller can pay all or part of it, or you walk away from the deal. It may cost you a few hundred dollars for the inspection but you won't be buying a multi-thousand dollar problem. If everything goes well with the inspection either you or the mechanic can perform what ever maintenance is required and then the mechanic signs you off with a new condition inspection. NEVER believe a seller that says an airplane has a fresh annual or condition inspection and everything is OK. No reason to be rude but proceed as if everything they say is false until proven differently. Good luck.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tralika View Post
    The EAA has some pretty good information on just what your looking for. Go to the EAA homepage, open the Education & Resources tab on the top of the page, open the Videos tab on the left side of that page and do a search for "BUY". You'll find multiple videos about buying Amateur Built Aircraft. I'm guessing it will take you several hours to watch them. That may sound like a lot of time so you'll have to determine how valuable your time is. The information could save you thousands of dollars and months of frustrating wasted time.

    If it were me, I would ignore the time since the last condition inspection and have a new inspection done by someone that does not know the seller and has never worked on the plane. Negotiate your deal with the seller making sure he discloses all deficiencies he knows of. Find a competent A&P or better yet, IA that will perform the inspection & is prepared to sign off the aircraft as airworthy in the log books. Have only the inspection done. If any deficiencies are found that is the time to decide if you want to re-negotiate with the seller. If something is required that costs a few bucks to correct you might want to pay for it yourself. If something is found that will cost hundreds or thousands to correct either the seller can pay all or part of it, or you walk away from the deal. It may cost you a few hundred dollars for the inspection but you won't be buying a multi-thousand dollar problem. If everything goes well with the inspection either you or the mechanic can perform what ever maintenance is required and then the mechanic signs you off with a new condition inspection. NEVER believe a seller that says an airplane has a fresh annual or condition inspection and everything is OK. No reason to be rude but proceed as if everything they say is false until proven differently. Good luck.
    Thanks for all the insight!! I am going to get a pre-but inspection with an A&P but what is a “IA”? The airplane has not had a condition inspection in quite some time (11 years). I like the airplane but I am not going to get into something Imay regret later!

  9. #9

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    wow, it's going to need a lot of work. I'd just negotiate a price I was comfortable with, buy it and go from there.


    An A&P that holds inspection authorization is called an IA. Usually irrelevant to homebuilts. In fact, if they are not familiar with homebuilts, that will probably work against you.

  10. #10
    Sam Buchanan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tralika View Post

    Find a competent A&P or better yet, IA that will perform the inspection & is prepared to sign off the aircraft as airworthy in the log books.
    Just for clarification....an A&P can make the logbook endorsement for the Condition Inspection for an aircraft with an Experimental Airworthiness Certificate, an IA is not required.
    Sam Buchanan
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