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Thread: Medical for Experimental

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by martymayes View Post
    The way I read it, OL #7 is inclusive of all subsections of 21.191 .
    It wouldn't make sense to include #16 and 20. But clearly #18 applies with the 191 (g)
    My head hurts....

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  2. #22

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    I think 16 is applicable to former military aircraft only (regardless of subsection)

    20 is saying the life limit of a life-limited component doesn't go away just because it's bolted to an experimental airplane (again, regardless of subsection)

  3. #23
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    Y'all are going to make my head explode ! I just want to commit aviation and drill holes in the sky !
    Bob

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by robert l View Post
    Y'all are going to make my head explode ! I just want to commit aviation and drill holes in the sky !
    Bob
    Bob, you should have a couple options to fly; Basic Med without the old fashioned medical certificate:

    https://www.faa.gov/licenses_certifi...ion/basic_med/


    If the plane meets LSA parameters, no medical.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by rwanttaja View Post
    For those playing at home:

    (l)Exceptions.

    (1) This section does not require a category and class rating for aircraft not type-certificated as airplanes, rotorcraft, gliders, lighter-than-air aircraft, powered-lifts, powered parachutes, or weight-shift-control aircraft.


    Homebuilts, of course, are not type-certificated.
    I was thinking more about:
    (2) The rating limitations of this section do not apply to -
    (i) An applicant when taking a practical test given by an examiner;
    (ii) The holder of a student pilot certificate;
    (iii) The holder of a pilot certificate when operating an aircraft under the authority of -
    (A) A provisional type certificate; or
    (B) An experimental certificate, unless the operation involves carrying a passenger;

    But I concede your point.

  6. #26
    robert l's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by martymayes View Post
    Bob, you should have a couple options to fly; Basic Med without the old fashioned medical certificate:

    If the plane meets LSA parameters, no medical.
    https://www.faa.gov/licenses_certifi...ion/basic_med/

    Marty, I let my medical expire years ago and have been flying S/P. I want to get my 3rd class back because there are a lot more chances to fly, 150's, 152's, 172's, 140's, etc. There are two Champs for rent within a 200 mi. radius and no other Light Sport aircraft even close. There are probably 30 Cessna's and Pipers for rent within 50 mi. so that's the reasoning behind my quest.
    Bob

  7. #27

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    I guess my point is that in order to legally pilot a fixed wing powered aircraft at LSA weight or above as PIC, one must hold a pilot's license...which implies a medical, whether by way of a driver's license or a Class III physical when obtained.

    Student pilots must have a physical before they can solo while under instruction.

    Good luck finding a CFI that will go along with "Oh, I don't need a physical of any type to solo, because I'm going to train in an Experimental!"
    The opinions and statements of this poster are largely based on facts and portray a possible version of the actual events.

  8. #28
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    Good luck finding a CFI that will go along with "Oh, I don't need a physical of any type to solo, because I'm going to train in an Experimental!"

    Nobody made that statement and it is obviously NOT true.

    Again, the requirement for the medical depends on the PILOT CERTIFICATE required to exercise the flight being conducted. Operations requiring a private pilot (airplanes, rotorcraft) require a third class or basic med. Operations requiring only a sport pilot only require the sport pilot "driver's license" medical.

    Our foray int 61.31 was only because someone incorrectly stated I was wrong when I made the above statement earlier and further stated incorrectly that the EXPERIMENTAL status of an aircraft made no difference on the pilot certificate required.


  9. #29

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    I'm honestly not trying to piss in your Wheaties, but the original question of what the medical requirements for flying an Experimental are is actually pretty straight forward - they are the same as for any other aircraft of the same classification.

    And I'd like to thank you for enlightening me on endorsements for Experimentals, which is eye opening. I met a guy who, without a tail wheel endorsement, performed most of his test flight phase before obtaining it. After he burned through his 40, he took up a CFI in the aircraft and, naturally, demonstrated he was more than capable enough to earn it.

    The CFI was his first passenger.

    It's actually pretty neat to learn that he was completely within the regulations and did it by the book.
    The opinions and statements of this poster are largely based on facts and portray a possible version of the actual events.

  10. #30

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    The exemption from a Rating requirement for solo experimental flight might not apply to tailwheel endorsements.
    Some folks say the tailwheel endorsement is required for all airplanes (61.31(i).

    It's funny, all the talk about the rating exemptions for experimentals (in the rules several places). Because the way I read 61.31(c), no category, class or type rating is required for solo flight (for any aircraft).
    A helicopter instructor once told me that since I had a Private Pilot Certificate with Airplane category, the student solo endorsements for me to fly solo in a rotorcraft category were not required.

    I wish there was a plain (Plane?) English understandable book or website for this stuff.
    My 5 hours allotment of FAR's study for the month has almost expired.
    Last edited by Bill Berson; 01-13-2018 at 03:18 PM.

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