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Thread: North 40 Showers

  1. #11
    rwanttaja's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarlOrton View Post
    I had to stop and think for a moment there, Ron; I was thinking those are some weirdo ascii characters you're throwing out there, but then remembered I was trying to translate hex.
    It's kind of bastard ASCII in any case...instead of converting the spaces to ASCII, I left them as spaces.

    And I agree with Bill; maintaining old technology like that in this day and age is idiotic.

    Ron "We can't have archaic and read it too" Wanttaja

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaleB View Post
    Oshkosh, WI airport (KOSH)
    2:53 PM UTC on the 6th
    Winds 190 at 3 knots
    10 mile visibility
    Clear below 12,000 MSL
    -20 C (-4 F), dewpoint -23 C (-9 F)
    Altimeter 30.58
    I'm going to assume you're correct and I'm impressed because quite frankly I've forgotten a lot of meteorological nomenclature. When I look up the NavCanada weather website, I'm given a choice to receive the Metar and TAF info in "English" or standard nomenclature. I've become quite spoiled, I always choose English.

  3. #13
    DaleB's Avatar
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    I always opt for the plain English version when available, but it ain't exactly rocket surgery if the weather isn't going to hell.

    KMLE 082135Z AUTO 21006KT 10SM CLR 09/01 A3007 RMK AO2 T00920011

    Location, date/time, winds, visibility, ceiling, temp/dewpoint, altimeter. In this case AUTO means a fully automated report... there's a bunch more crud that can be in there. I have to look it up sometimes. I think using cryptic abbreviations that need explanation is a little silly too. On the other hand, I don't want a full paragraph narrative that I have to read through.

    If you think METARs are cryptic, try the TAF. Sheesh.
    TAF
    KOKC 051130Z 051212 14008KT 5SM BR BKN030 TEMPO 1316 1 1/2SM BR
    FM1600 16010KT P6SM SKC
    BECMG 2224 20013G20KT 4SM SHRA OVC020 PROB40 0006 2SM TSRA OVC008CB
    BECMG 0608 21015KT P6SM NSW SCT040 =
    Measure twice, cut once...
    scratch head, shrug, shim to fit.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaleB View Post
    Oshkosh, WI airport (KOSH)
    2:53 PM UTC on the 6th
    Winds 190 at 3 knots
    10 mile visibility
    Clear below 12,000 MSL
    -20 C (-4 F), dewpoint -23 C (-9 F)
    Altimeter 30.58
    So an occasional Sport Pilot is supposed to memorize that M20/M23 is temperature/dew point?
    That is just nonsense.
    On top of that we need to convert from C to F (if we even know it is C). Crazy.

  5. #15
    DaleB's Avatar
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    The weather cares not what flavor of pilot certificate you have, nor what you're flying. So... Sport Pilot or no, you need to understand the weather report. The temp/dewpoint are always in the same format and same place. There's no need to convert C to F, any more than you need to convert between knots and MPH if your panel is set up for one or the other.

    If you don't like expending the mental energy required to get the information you need from METARs, listen to the AWOS/ATIS/ASOS weather broadcast or get it from the Internet. It's assumed that a pilot will be smart enough and have the training (which EVERY pilot has to receive to pass the written exam) to be able to get by.

    It's not that tough to figure this stuff out.
    Measure twice, cut once...
    scratch head, shrug, shim to fit.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Berson View Post
    So an occasional Sport Pilot is supposed to memorize that M20/M23 is temperature/dew point?
    That is just nonsense.
    No, no one needs to memorize that. And no, it's not nonsense. All any type licensed pilot needs to know is that you want to see an actual difference in degrees between temp and dew point in a Wx report. And if there isn't, you will not go flying.

  7. #17

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    Are you saying any licensed pilot doesn't need to memorize what the M code is for?
    Last edited by Bill Berson; 01-09-2018 at 04:32 PM.

  8. #18

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    Once more, no memorization of nomenclature or sequence of info required any longer. As I and DaleB said, you can receive Wx in plain English.

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