Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 32

Thread: Homebuilt Fleet Sizes - 2017

  1. #11

    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    87
    Ron,

    Let me know if you want to have someone else look at your database and make the process a bit faster (if possible).

    Tim

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    2,048
    Interesting that my Nieuport 11 is listed as a Nieuport II by the FAA, as are a lot of them...seems to be an even split. I guess I should have put a better swoop on the numbers on the paperwork.
    The opinions and statements of this poster are largely based on facts and portray a possible version of the actual events.

  3. #13
    rwanttaja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    2,019
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Giger View Post
    Interesting that my Nieuport 11 is listed as a Nieuport II by the FAA, as are a lot of them...seems to be an even split. I guess I should have put a better swoop on the numbers on the paperwork.
    Well, that's where the fun comes in when trying to extract given airplane types. Have to search RV-6, RV6, RV Six, RV XI, etc. Even have to do stuff like Bee Dee Four.

    Searching for Nieuports is even tougher, because Nieuport is more of a description than an actual model. There are Redfern Nieuports, CIRCA Nieuports, Aerodrome Nieuports, and the good 'ol Newports. Finding a Nieuport in the registry is no guarantee it is like one's own.

    FWIW, just searching for "Nieu", I get 81 total hits, of which 65 are confirmed registered as EABs.

    Ron Wanttaja

  4. #14
    Jeff Point's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Milwaukee
    Posts
    269
    I counted 91 Breezys of all the known registration variations. We're catching up on the Cozys!
    Jeff Point
    RV-6 and RLU-1 built & flying
    Tech Counselor, Flight Advisor & President, EAA Chapter 18
    Milwaukee, WI
    "It All Started Here!"

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    31
    I noticed that the number of scratch built homebuilts, like the Piet. and Baby ace have declined steadily over the years, but the more expensive kit built aircraft like the RVs, Sea Rays, and Sonex have steadily increased.
    Do you suppose that's a reflection on the longevity of the design, or perhaps something else?
    Perhaps it illustrates the improving affluence of a select set of builders, moving up to more expensive options?
    Or maybe a collective fear of self-directed construction ie. no build manual to walk you through it.
    Or, the higher performance is "in" now vs the low and slow of some older homebuilts.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Marietta, GA
    Posts
    679
    Quote Originally Posted by Tench745 View Post
    I noticed that the number of scratch built homebuilts, like the Piet. and Baby ace have declined steadily over the years, but the more expensive kit built aircraft like the RVs, Sea Rays, and Sonex have steadily increased.
    Do you suppose that's a reflection on the longevity of the design, or perhaps something else?
    Perhaps it illustrates the improving affluence of a select set of builders, moving up to more expensive options?
    Or maybe a collective fear of self-directed construction ie. no build manual to walk you through it.
    Or, the higher performance is "in" now vs the low and slow of some older homebuilts.
    The entire industry is intent on pushing builders upscale. Garmin? Dynon, AFS, GRT, etc... They, and Van's, and the rest of the industry know that you'll spend 5x the $$ on the panel and accessories for an RV-X than you'll spend for the panel on a Pietenpol. Same thing with the engine... Lycoming loves high end EAB's. So does Hartzell. They are glad to sell to the Piet or Fly-Baby builder, but the real money is in higher end stuff. So they push you in that direction. The plans only airplanes basically only exist in the little bitty AD's in the back of SA. You won't see a huge Hatz booth at Oshkosh. Fly Baby or Piet either. So those designs don't even register with today's 30 year old who becomes interested in building an airplane.

    Directionally, Sport Aviation does the same thing. With few exceptions, which aircraft are featured? The expensive ones with professional panels, builder assist, and a $15k pro paint job. Right or wrong it is easy to believe that the EAA is happy to push the homebuilt fleet up market. EAA makes money off of the big vendors, whether in SA advertisements, booth space at Oshkosh, or in corporate donations. EAA wants those high dollar vendors happy and participating because that makes money for EAA.

    So.. Short version: Marketing.

    And now I'll go back to sanding on the RV-10 in the basement...

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    930
    The number of "active" EA-B is about 21,000 (est). Goes up and down and above and below 20,000 past decade.
    Latest info (2015) on left.
    Name:  image.jpg
Views: 182
Size:  15.4 KB

  8. #18
    rwanttaja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    2,019
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Berson View Post
    The number of "active" EA-B is about 21,000 (est). Goes up and down and above and below 20,000 past decade.
    Latest info (2015) on left.
    Bill, that picture is teeny tiny and doesn't, apparently enlarge. But is it from the FAA GA Survey? Don't get me started on the GA survey. :-)

    Ron Wanttaja
    Last edited by rwanttaja; 01-02-2018 at 09:34 PM.

  9. #19
    rwanttaja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    2,019
    Quote Originally Posted by Tench745 View Post
    I noticed that the number of scratch built homebuilts, like the Piet. and Baby ace have declined steadily over the years, but the more expensive kit built aircraft like the RVs, Sea Rays, and Sonex have steadily increased.
    Do you suppose that's a reflection on the longevity of the design, or perhaps something else?
    Pretty simple, really: People are more willing to pay money to reduce construction time.

    You see the same thing in a lot of hobby fields. Thirty years ago, you either built an RC airplane from plans or from a kit where you still had to glue all the ribs, spars, stringers, bulkheads, etc. Nowadays, most are sold ready-to-fly or Almost ready-to-fly (ARF). People are less interested in spending time constructing.

    Same thing for the full-scale airplanes.

    Ron Wanttaja

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    WA
    Posts
    930
    Quote Originally Posted by rwanttaja View Post
    Bill, that picture is teeny tiny and doesn't, apparently enlarge. But is it from the FAA GA Survey? Don't get me started on the GA survey. :-)

    Ron Wanttaja
    Yes. From here : https://www.faa.gov/data_research/av...eral_aviation/
    I tried to get GAMA data, but site kept crashing my iPad.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •