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Thread: I am a flight 'virgin' no more!

  1. #21

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    Randy, frankly color visions is not that important for a pilot, often light gun signals are given as one thing needed, but not many of us have ever had to really use light gun signals with loss of all coms and a plane still flys just fine with or without coms. Normal vision is important. I think sport pilot would be fine for you, quicker and cheaper than private, you mainly miss night flying, instrument flying and perhaps some cross country instruction. I havent flown an Evektor but have flown a Gobosh which is similar and a neat little plane.

  2. #22

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    Correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought the coloured number dots were primarily about determining various degrees of depth perception.

  3. #23

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    The simple colored dot test only alerts of partial defective color vision. I can't pass the color test either. I took a special FAA test to get a Statement Of Demonstrated Ability which allowed me to get a Private certificate with no restrictions.

  4. #24

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    Good to know should I desire to move beyond Sport Pilot down the road. For now I'll concentrate on baby steps... and IMHO purchasing the Flight Sim X Evektor software today also counts as a baby step - LOL. Next will be the Gleim kit.

  5. #25
    robert l's Avatar
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    I'm not color blind but I am blind in one eye and I fly Sport Pilot. I haven't had a 3rd class medical in over 35 years but have been thinking about going for it. I was never denied one, just let it expire. Depth perception at a distance isn't a proplem. As for now, I can't thread a needle but I can land an Aeronca Champ !
    Bob

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by CHICAGORANDY View Post
    My plan is to do the ground school portion online at home using the Gleim product, take the test and then start flight training at that grass strip airport about an hour-fifteen from my home. At the FBO I saw they offer the Gleim materials and had a few boxes of the Gleim Sport Pilot Kit. I'm advised it is a solid courtesy to buy from them rather than Amazon...if they don't charge an extraordinary amount.
    I bought and used the Gleim "Sport Pilot Box" and can recommend it without reservation. It comes with an online school as well, which is pretty cool in taking the sample tests. Factor in shipping and it's probably a wash on the cost (but I'd check).

    The cool thing about being a Sport Pilot is that if you decide your mission requires a Private Pilot, all of the training will apply and you'll only have to do the hood, the night flying, the physical, written test, and check ride.

    Word of advice - on the dual cross country, make sure it's long enough to meet the Private Pilot standards. It probably will anyway, as the one for Sport Pilot is really short. The solo cross country stuff won't be a problem if you fly around with your Sport Pilot ticket normally.
    The opinions and statements of this poster are largely based on facts and portray a possible version of the actual events.

  7. #27
    DaleB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Giger View Post
    The cool thing about being a Sport Pilot is that if you decide your mission requires a Private Pilot, all of the training will apply and you'll only have to do the hood, the night flying, the physical, written test, and check ride.
    IF the CFI holds a regular CFI certificate. If he or s Sport Pilot CFI, the hours don't count as dual for Private Pilot training. I get the impression there aren't a lot of CFI-S certificate holders around. I was thinking about getting mine but there would be no practical purpose to it, since I have an E-LSA.
    Measure twice, cut once...
    scratch head, shrug, shim to fit.

  8. #28

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    That seems a bit unfair Dale, that you could do the 20 hours of so which I think Sport pilot requires and not be able to credit any of it toward private pilot. Never thought of that.
    The FBO I use most often doesnt teach sport pilot. Do you have to do the sport pilot flight instruction in a LSA, or could it be a reg plane, perhaps Cub or C150 etc?
    For many people the sport rating may get them flying where they might not have otherwise. The Gobosh I flew was similar to an Evektor and seemed like a good plane.
    Last edited by Bill Greenwood; 09-13-2017 at 01:13 PM.

  9. #29
    DaleB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Greenwood View Post
    That seems a bit unfair Dale, that you could do the 20 hours of so which I think Sport pilot requires and not be able to credit any of it toward private pilot. Never thought of that.
    The FBO I use most often doesnt teach sport pilot. Do you have to do the sport pilot flight instruction in a LSA, or could it be a reg plane, perhaps Cub or C150 etc?
    For many people the sport rating may get them flying where they might not have otherwise. The Gobosh I flew was similar to an Evektor and seemed like a good plane.
    Not my fault, complain to the FAA if it seems unfair. It seems that way to me too. But, a Sport Pilot CFI is not a "qualified instructor" for private pilot training. For one thing, as I understand it you can get a sport CFI ticket with 150 hours total time and no commercial certificate.

    You could do all of the training for SP up to solo in a non LSA. Solo and the checkride would have to be done in an LSA. My new co-owner was training in a Champ, but the Champ's owner/CFI doesn't have it insured for solo student pilots. There are exactly zero available LSAs for rent anywhere near here, no CFIs with an LSA that can be flown by a solo student pilot.

    So guess why he's now my new co-owner? The guy had to buy half an airplane to be able to get his Sport Pilot ticket. On the bright side, he'll be flying pretty cheaply once he's able to kick the instructor out. We figure our operating cost at under $30 per hour including gas, and about $140 per month each for hangar and insurance.
    Measure twice, cut once...
    scratch head, shrug, shim to fit.

  10. #30

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    It is my understanding after some research that the lessons must be given in an LSA qualified airplane. That alone doubtless makes for some difficulties for many since there are so few schools out this way that teach it or have an LSA to rent.

    Oh well, if it was easy I guess that everyone could then do it? lol

    But like Tom Hanks says in League of Their Own - "The hard is what makes it great."
    Last edited by CHICAGORANDY; 09-13-2017 at 01:35 PM.

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