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Thread: What is the purpose of EAA?

  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Berson View Post
    Change that supports and grows the original mission of grass roots aviation for the "little guy" would be a proper course to the future, no question.
    But EAA Sport Aviation has become a copy of Flying or AOPA magazine and is now the exact opposite of the original promoter of grass roots. I am only speaking of Sport Aviation now. Just look at the covers of past 12 issues and compare with the 60’s and 70’s.
    Before I began my RV-6, I'd find copies of SA on FBO tables and flip through them in a disinterested way. Then, I started the RV project and SA gained huge importance because of the inspiration provided by the stories and the technical help shared in the pages. Now, other than a few pages specifically set aside for technical stuff, you're right - it is indistinguishable from Flying. Instead of being project or member driven, the format is column driven, just like Flying. Pretty much, Mac recreated Flying Magazine under a new title. And now they both stink. I long for the day when almost every issue had a lengthy article or two on recent Grand Champion aircraft and their owners/builders...

    So, I say - kick out the columns, bring back the stories focused on aircraft and their owners/builders. At least the magazine will be a unique product that doesn't share the same space with Flying, Plane and Pilot, etc...

  2. #32

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    Aug 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by Floatsflyer View Post
    If at some time in the near or distant future, EAA Inc feels as you do and believes Oshkosh could be jeopardized by a paucity of volunteers, all they have to do is eliminate the requirement of being a member to volunteer and place a full page ad in the Oshkosh Times(or whatever it's called) and other surrounding city papers calling for volunteers. The relationship between EAA and the people of Wisconsin is so positive, the response would be beyond overwhelming.
    Having worked inside those walls I can tell you that time is (almost) now, and the ads to call on volunteers don't result in overwhelming support.
    Dennis Jenders, EAA #300475

  3. #33
    cluttonfred's Avatar
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    I agree with one caveat. There is nothing wrong inherently wrong with columns as long as they focus on homebuilding or vintage/warbird restoration or aerobatics or ultralights. Look at the incredible legacy that Tony Bingelis left behind, for example, or John Thorp's series of articles on building the T-18, or Bob Whittier's columns over the years. Yes, we could do with more in-depth looks at particular planes and projects focused on the person/people who actually did the building/restoration/design work (not just paid for it), but the right columns can also have an important place.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle Boatright View Post
    Before I began my RV-6, I'd find copies of SA on FBO tables and flip through them in a disinterested way. Then, I started the RV project and SA gained huge importance because of the inspiration provided by the stories and the technical help shared in the pages. Now, other than a few pages specifically set aside for technical stuff, you're right - it is indistinguishable from Flying. Instead of being project or member driven, the format is column driven, just like Flying. Pretty much, Mac recreated Flying Magazine under a new title. And now they both stink. I long for the day when almost every issue had a lengthy article or two on recent Grand Champion aircraft and their owners/builders...

    So, I say - kick out the columns, bring back the stories focused on aircraft and their owners/builders. At least the magazine will be a unique product that doesn't share the same space with Flying, Plane and Pilot, etc...
    *******
    Matthew Long, Editor
    cluttonfred.info
    A site for builders, owners and fans of Eric Clutton's FRED
    and other safe, simple, affordable homebuilt aircraft

  4. #34

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    Aug 2016
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    17
    Interesting topic and I've enjoyed reading people's different takes. When I think of EAA, I think of community, encouragement, innovation, education, brotherhood and some of the best memories I have with my family. My Dad and I have been coming since 1990. In all that time I don't think the purpose has changed- it's all about family. Everyone who walks through the Brown Arch has aviation running through their blood. Whether you have 30,000 hours under your belt or you're being pushed in a stroller- we all have a common interest. EAA has worked extremely hard to support, protect, nurture and foster that interest. That was true when I first attended Oshkosh and it's still true today. It's our role as community members to continue to spread the word, take kids flying, share our experiences and do whatever we can to grow aviation. EAA is truly a magical organization. I'm proud to be a part of it.

  5. #35

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    Oct 2011
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    WA
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    I agree with Kyle, monthly staff columns and no member or outsider technical articles is a big problem.
    A columnist cannot reasearch a highly technical subject every month.
    Bob Whittier probably took a year to reasearch his fabulous three part series on the "The Engine Situation". Bob Whittier was a manager that wrote occasional well reasearched articles based on actual experience as an aircraft mechanic.
    Bingelis had a monthly column but he was an exception. Tough to find anyone like him.
    Both solicited letters from members for ideas and input. Especially Bob, who was deaf and loved letters. (I wrote to him)

    Paying staff columnists to make up flying stories each month is the sign of a lazy publisher.
    The articles should be aircraft centered, not flying centered. Other magazines are pilot centered.
    People that buy airplanes can read Flying magazine for flying articles.
    People with no airplane need airplane design articles and the how to build or restore articles. DIY articles.
    There is only about 100,000 private airplanes left in the U.S. and shrinking. Something must be done soon.
    Last edited by Bill Berson; 05-20-2017 at 09:22 AM.

  6. #36
    lnuss's Avatar
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    Colorado
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    If EAA were ONLY for people who actually build experimental aircraft, I'd drop it in a heartbeat. Don't get me wrong, I enjoy articles about construction techniques, about the aircraft folks have built and want to show off, about PIREPS on homebuilts, and more, but I don't have the patience to build such an aircraft even though I love the aircraft themselves, and I'd certainly not trust going up in something I'd built. But when you build an airplane, it's likely you'll want to fly it, too, and articles about flying technique, political shenanigans related to aviation, new equipment available for pilots, as well as aircraft, and much more should also be appropriate. Renovating older aircraft should be just as welcome as scratch, plans and/or kit-built craft.

    So the current balance of articles I see in SA isn't bad, though it's certainly not the kind of publication that has EVERY article appealing to EVERY reader -- a compromise, in other words, trying to cover a broad range of interests. For those who think SA is "just like Flying" note that the recent changes in Flying have me debating about dropping my subscription because they've gone more and more in the direction of making it difficult to tell the articles from the ads, unless you carefully scrutinize each page -- they seem to want pretty instead of functional.

    So though I have very little actual flying time in a homebuilt (lots of time in Cubs, Stearmans, Citabrias, gliders, etc.), I'm one who is thankful that EAA welcomes a broad spectrum of aviation afficianados, whether pilot, builder, on-looker or...

    And OSH is a great place to go, lots to admire and learn about and enjoy.

    Larry N.

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