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Thread: Trying to Fly ~ Looking for you all to help guide me!

  1. #11
    falcon21's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    48
    A good piece of advice that was given to me and I'll pass on to you, study the books first. A lot of people stress out over the FAA written test but there are many great resources out there, including free ones, that will help you pass. Once you pass the written it will help ease your mind and you can focus more on the flying aspect. I personally studied just the Gleim Private Pilot Handbook and then the Gleim FAA Knowledge Test book. Before I took the written I went online and found some free practice tests. Once I felt I was confident I could pass I went in and took the test.

    You have several options on how to go about it, you can go through a flight school and take their ground school course, you can take an online course, or you can study the books the old fashion way like I did. The flight school option might be more expensive but if they have a set schedule where you show up and study that may help avoid procrastinating. The online courses are a great option and break everything down into sections with videos to help and a quiz at the end of each section to ensure you are learning. My dad took the Gleim online Sport Pilot Course and he really liked it. There are other companies that offer it too that I'm sure are just as good. I believe with this option you do not need a CFI to sign off to take the FAA written as you are endorsed by Gleim. Your last option is just to sit down with an old fashion book and read. You must dedicate time and not put off reading it. With this option you will need to get a CFI to sign off on you so you can take the FAA written. Everyone is different so go with the way you think you will learn the best.

    Good luck! If you have any questions feel free to ask and many of us will be glad to help. I took the written last year and I'm hoping to finish up my license pretty soon here so everything is still fresh in my mind.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    122
    Flight schools generally are more expensive that hooking up with a compatible CFI for lessons using a club rental plane. But flight schools may have simulators which can save plane rental costs, so I'd look into both options.
    I'd have a tentative schedule of flights and their anticipated progress goals so you are not just wasting money with plain repitition. Each student will progress at different rates so the schedule isn't locked in beforehand but should be close. I'd sit down with the CFI initially and determine personal rapport and get a list of pilots the CFI trained and speak with them about his technique/would they use him again.
    Good luck.
    Bob H

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by falcon21 View Post
    A good piece of advice that was given to me and I'll pass on to you, study the books first. A lot of people stress out over the FAA written test but there are many great resources out there, including free ones, that will help you pass. Once you pass the written it will help ease your mind and you can focus more on the flying aspect. I personally studied just the Gleim Private Pilot Handbook and then the Gleim FAA Knowledge Test book. Before I took the written I went online and found some free practice tests. Once I felt I was confident I could pass I went in and took the test.

    You have several options on how to go about it, you can go through a flight school and take their ground school course, you can take an online course, or you can study the books the old fashion way like I did. The flight school option might be more expensive but if they have a set schedule where you show up and study that may help avoid procrastinating. The online courses are a great option and break everything down into sections with videos to help and a quiz at the end of each section to ensure you are learning. My dad took the Gleim online Sport Pilot Course and he really liked it. There are other companies that offer it too that I'm sure are just as good. I believe with this option you do not need a CFI to sign off to take the FAA written as you are endorsed by Gleim. Your last option is just to sit down with an old fashion book and read. You must dedicate time and not put off reading it. With this option you will need to get a CFI to sign off on you so you can take the FAA written. Everyone is different so go with the way you think you will learn the best.

    Good luck! If you have any questions feel free to ask and many of us will be glad to help. I took the written last year and I'm hoping to finish up my license pretty soon here so everything is still fresh in my mind.
    I will certainly be looking in Gleim! I haven't got to sit down and speak to my potential instructor yet but when I do I will see how he takes the idea of book study ground training for him.


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  4. #14
    Good news everyone!
    I received the plans for the Pietenpol today!
    I will be studying these in depth before ordering any supplies or building materials.


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  5. #15

    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    1
    Bradley, you have gotten a lot of great replies. I have 100 hours of twin stick to date and have nearly mastered my take-offs and landings now in my Piper colt PA20/22 taildragger. I have read the FAR-AIM, Jeppesen course, many study aids @ the .gov sites, and ASA courses till I am nearly blind. LOTS more on U-tube. Join EAA and AOPA, they are great sources too. Keep pushing the learning in till you can pass the mock exams on the internet @ 90% or better. If I can do it at 65 years old, you can too.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    1,808
    I would check with EAA and/or AOPA to see exaclty what FAA requires for color vision,then go to optomotrist to get eyes checked to see if you can meet whatever waiver there is. Dont go to AME to take test first that you might fail.
    If you can get past the color part, ( my guess is that there is a waiver for that) and are otherwise healthy you might take the medical for Class II or even I, never hurts to have that and when it expires you just drop to the next class.
    LSA is fine, BUT its a bit like being the place kicker on the football team. If you have the time, 3or 4 months, and money,$8000 or so, I suggest getting a full private pilot license and being able to fly a 172 etc with no restirictions.
    You can always then check out in a LSA plane easily if you want later.
    Dont let anyone tell you that the private is hard or that you need to limit to LSA. Only real limit is time money moslty money.
    Your Gen. who instructs is more likely than not to be familar with 172 types than Light sport anyway. The type of plane is not the most important part, your desire to learn ( you probably have this ) and how good the CFI is are more important.
    Last edited by Bill Greenwood; 03-11-2017 at 09:33 AM.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    1,808
    As for passing the written test any college student should do it in a breeze. I made 98 and that was from book study, it is about as hard as a junior high school course.
    By far the best, easiest, quickest way to study and pass written test is one of the online COMPUTER INTERACTIVE courses from King Schools or maybe Sportys.
    Not as cheap as books which you might evenn borrow or find at library but computer is much more direct and saves time. Just take the practice tests and youll know when you are ready for the FAA written.
    Last edited by Bill Greenwood; 03-11-2017 at 09:43 AM.

  8. #18
    Cary's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO
    Posts
    162
    I'm also color blind to some extent, what is called "red-green" color blindness--that sounds like what you have. Like you, I have some difficulty with the colors on VFR charts, but no problem with stop lights. Sometimes I can pass the color test; sometimes I can't. The first time I failed it was back in 1972, so I took a "color threshold" test and passed. Another possibility is a light gun test. Then you end up with a "statement of demonstrated ability" or SODA, which pretty much eliminates the need to try to pass it again. I still carry my SODA, although it's pretty beat up, but most of the time I just take the color test and pass enough of it.

    Bottom line is that for civilian flying, being color blind is not an impediment, just an annoyance.

    Have fun--that's the single most important thing about learning to fly. If you're enjoying it, you'll learn faster and better. You're paying for it, so you don't need an instructor who belittles, who yells, or who mistreats you in any way. There are still some who do that, although mostly they're an anachronism. You want someone who knows the subject, can teach it, and who can adjust to your way of learning. Whether an instructor has been doing it for a long time or a short time isn't nearly as important as someone who really wants to teach.

    But you have to do your part, too. When I was instructing, every so often I'd have a student who didn't prepare between lessons. So do your homework. When your instructor tells you to review this or that before the next lesson, do it. The students I had who did their homework progressed much better than those who didn't.

    It's a good idea to get the written (knowledge) test out of the way well before you're ready for your checkride (practical). But at the same time, you'll understand the theory a lot easier if you're also flying so that you can apply it.

    Try to schedule at least 2 lessons per week. The longer time between lessons, the more you'll forget. But it's also not a good idea to cram too many lessons in each week.

    There are several hawkers of written study materials. I'm fond of Kings--they're hoky but really excellent. There are also texts that are worth obtaining. I like the Kershner books. Bob Gardner's books are excellent. And don't forget that the FAA publishes manuals, which are all free and available online: the Airplane Flying Handbook and the Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, along with the Aeronautical Information Manual, are all essential. They are a bit dry--not what most people would call "page turners", but they're full of necessary information.

    Good luck!

    Cary
    "I have slipped the surly bonds of earth...,
    put out my hand and touched the face of God." J.G. Magee

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Cary View Post
    I'm also color blind to some extent, what is called "red-green" color blindness--that sounds like what you have. Like you, I have some difficulty with the colors on VFR charts, but no problem with stop lights. Sometimes I can pass the color test; sometimes I can't. The first time I failed it was back in 1972, so I took a "color threshold" test and passed. Another possibility is a light gun test. Then you end up with a "statement of demonstrated ability" or SODA, which pretty much eliminates the need to try to pass it again. I still carry my SODA, although it's pretty beat up, but most of the time I just take the color test and pass enough of it.

    Bottom line is that for civilian flying, being color blind is not an impediment, just an annoyance.

    Have fun--that's the single most important thing about learning to fly. If you're enjoying it, you'll learn faster and better. You're paying for it, so you don't need an instructor who belittles, who yells, or who mistreats you in any way. There are still some who do that, although mostly they're an anachronism. You want someone who knows the subject, can teach it, and who can adjust to your way of learning. Whether an instructor has been doing it for a long time or a short time isn't nearly as important as someone who really wants to teach.

    But you have to do your part, too. When I was instructing, every so often I'd have a student who didn't prepare between lessons. So do your homework. When your instructor tells you to review this or that before the next lesson, do it. The students I had who did their homework progressed much better than those who didn't.

    It's a good idea to get the written (knowledge) test out of the way well before you're ready for your checkride (practical). But at the same time, you'll understand the theory a lot easier if you're also flying so that you can apply it.

    Try to schedule at least 2 lessons per week. The longer time between lessons, the more you'll forget. But it's also not a good idea to cram too many lessons in each week.

    There are several hawkers of written study materials. I'm fond of Kings--they're hoky but really excellent. There are also texts that are worth obtaining. I like the Kershner books. Bob Gardner's books are excellent. And don't forget that the FAA publishes manuals, which are all free and available online: the Airplane Flying Handbook and the Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, along with the Aeronautical Information Manual, are all essential. They are a bit dry--not what most people would call "page turners", but they're full of necessary information.

    Good luck!

    Cary
    Thanks for the comment! It reminded me to update this post!
    I've found an instructor (who is also colorblind) and has been a tremendously helpful!
    I've actually got a team of people trying to see if I can apply for a pilot slot at my base if I get color corrective glasses and I'm able to pass the flight exam with them. So we've talked to multiple doctors and things seem positive right now!
    I'm trying not to get my hopes up too much but I'm happy to even get this small sliver of hope!


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