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Thread: Dose auto engine available to convert to aero using?

  1. #11

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    One thing to keep in mind is that static ground tests may be more stressful as there isn't much induced airflow associated with forward movement. When you are climbing out, you may be seeing an additional 80 mph in air speed. I don't remember what the relationship between velocity and convective cooling is, but that little bit of extra airspeed could be very helpful in cooling.

  2. #12

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    Air flow truly effect on engine cooling especially fix wing aircraft. However, on helicopter the engine usually at the middle back, it can't accept as same amount air flow as fixwing that engine installed at front. But without test data, discussions are always empty in truth. If you can provide temperture record during both ground test and practical use based on same engine, that will be perfect to figure out how much can airflow do on engine cooling and that will very helpful.

  3. #13

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    Don't helicopters usually have cooling fans?

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by c322348 View Post
    Don't helicopters usually have cooling fans?
    Great big ones they put on top of the engines. I mean the blades to the engine cooling fan are absolutely huge.

    Top View, it's almost impossible to provide the answer you're looking for, as every engine and every cooling set up is different.

    I can tell you that my engine won't overheat sitting at an idle. Indeed, my main concern is ensuring the engine is warm enough for flight prior to takeoff even in 100 degree plus temperatures. Just one look at my cowl and engine provides the answer - it's a half cowl with an oil cooler the size of three ring binder right in the prop wash.

    Indeed, my engine compartment is so open to prop wash and the plane is so draggy that I doubt the engine knows whether or not it is flying!
    The opinions and statements of this poster are largely based on facts and portray a possible version of the actual events.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Giger View Post
    Great big ones they put on top of the engines. I mean the blades to the engine cooling fan are absolutely huge.

    Top View, it's almost impossible to provide the answer you're looking for, as every engine and every cooling set up is different.

    I can tell you that my engine won't overheat sitting at an idle. Indeed, my main concern is ensuring the engine is warm enough for flight prior to takeoff even in 100 degree plus temperatures. Just one look at my cowl and engine provides the answer - it's a half cowl with an oil cooler the size of three ring binder right in the prop wash.

    Indeed, my engine compartment is so open to prop wash and the plane is so draggy that I doubt the engine knows whether or not it is flying!
    Your thinking is suprised, I never make rotor as a fan. But seriously the centre of rotor always rotate as slowest speed and blow only few airflow. But never mind.

    The idea making a pressure area to trap airflow seems effective on small engine. How many power can it input at 3300 rpm? Compare to 100hp+ water cooling engine they usually run as 4500-5000, as you say different engine have different cooling, I think coolant efficency have more importance than airflow.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by c322348 View Post
    Don't helicopters usually have cooling fans?
    Most of people do instill a fan behind radiator. But not every one

  7. #17

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    Top View, you've got to ask a better question.

    I'm guessing that English is a second language - and that you are excellent in it - but it is hard understanding exactly what you want to know.

    For air cooled engines, like the VW (my 1915cc VW is around 90 HP) or the Corvair (about 120 HP, making it a good alternative to an O-200), they work about the same as certified engines.

    For liquid cooled automotive engines, I'll defer to others. But in the end it always comes down to how the builder runs the cooling. Some are better than others. But it is always about airflow, whether over the cylinders and oil cooler in an air cooled engine or a radiator in a liquid cooled one.

    My comment about helicopter rotors was a joke, btw. I often refer to my engine as the "loud fan up front."
    The opinions and statements of this poster are largely based on facts and portray a possible version of the actual events.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Giger View Post
    I often refer to my engine as the "loud fan up front."
    The sole purpose is to keep the pilot cool. When it stops, you can actually see the pilot start to sweat! ;-)

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Giger View Post
    Top View, you've got to ask a better question.

    I'm guessing that English is a second language - and that you are excellent in it - but it is hard understanding exactly what you want to know.

    For air cooled engines, like the VW (my 1915cc VW is around 90 HP) or the Corvair (about 120 HP, making it a good alternative to an O-200), they work about the same as certified engines.

    For liquid cooled automotive engines, I'll defer to others. But in the end it always comes down to how the builder runs the cooling. Some are better than others. But it is always about airflow, whether over the cylinders and oil cooler in an air cooled engine or a radiator in a liquid cooled one.

    My comment about helicopter rotors was a joke, btw. I often refer to my engine as the "loud fan up front."
    Sorry about the ambiguity question. Turlly English is not my native langyuage and I just study it for few years, may not express exactly.
    Briefly I want to figure out what kinds of cooling system can do better as same power output. But this question seems not significant, as you said it depends on how builders manage it.

    Thanks for replied as plenty information, that already very helpful.

  10. #20
    Jim Heffelfinger's Avatar
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    I am so surprised to NOT see the Viking Engine (Honda Derived) mentioned in this thread. If you get past Jan's rhetoric and see the results of a few hundred engines in service and development now with a 130hp and the 160+ Turbo. I believe he is producing 25+ engines a month. Yes. Jan has a past...and he has solved that problem with selling a plug-N Play engine assembly. Fully supported with mounts, cowlings and FWF supplies. Can't beat the price either. Friend here in NoCal has the West Coast service site has an engine ( 110) in a Sonex with I am sure 1000 hours on it by now. It moves the plane at VNE.
    It may have been mentioned already is the heat transfer issue when a VW engine is pushed into the upper RPM numbers under load. A number of fixes are available to support this.

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