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Thread: 1941 Taylorcraft BC12-65D Vh speed?

  1. #1

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    1941 Taylorcraft BC12-65D Vh speed?

    I am trying to determine the Vh speed for a 1941 Taylocraft BC12-65D for the purpose of the greater than or less than 87 knot endorsement for sport pilot certificate. Anyone know this one or how to accurately determine the Vh?

  2. #2
    As a starter, I would google "TCDS" and "BC12-65D". You should open "A-696" the Type Certificate Data Sheet for the Taylorcraft BC-12 family. In there you will find the maximum airspeed in level flight. I realize that this is not exactly Vh, but it should give you starting point. Pete

  3. #3

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    Thank you very much Pete!

  4. #4

    speed

    Never got mind above 90 MPH never more Knots

  5. #5

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    If you get a definitive answer, please let us know. If it's less, good... if it's greater, as I understand it even though I have a PPL I can't fly, say, a Quicksilver without an endorsement (even though I have lots of ultralight time) if I don't have a current medical?

    Mine would cruise 95 at 2150 rpm with the windows closed in smooth air, but only if I dove a bit to get it on the "step"... it wouldn't accelerate to 95 in level flight.

  6. #6

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    Check in with taylorcraft.org for all the info there is on t-craft. All 65 hp b model t-crafts can be flown by sport pilot rated aviators. My daughter in law got her sport pilot licence flying a '41.

  7. #7

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    All T-Crafts can be flown by sport pilots, but there's a matter of an endorsement for aircraft with Vh over 87 knots or those under 87 knots... if a SP learns to fly in one, he needs an additional endorsement for the other. It appears from the regs that a PP flying as a SP (i.e. without a medical) would also need the endorsement.

  8. #8

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    Dana, help me out re PPs flying as a SP. I cant find any mention of any Vh max or min under Part 61.113 PP privleges. 61.327 only deals with SPs. And a grandfather clause, 62.327c goes back to Apr 2, 2010. Where did they hide it?

  9. #9

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    Well, it's really not clear. 61.303 says:
    (2) Only a U.S. driver's license (i) A sport pilot certificate, (A) Any light-sport aircraft for which you hold the endorsements required for its category and class. ( 1 ) You must hold any other endorsements required by this subpart, and comply with the limitations in 61.315.
    (ii) At least a recreational pilot certificate with a category and class rating, (A) Any light-sport aircraft in that category and class, ( 1 ) You do not have to hold any of the endorsements required by this subpart, but you must comply with the limitations in 61.315.
    61.315 says:
    (c) You may not act as pilot in command of a light-sport aircraft:
    (1) That is carrying a passenger or property for compensation or hire.
    (2) For compensation or hire.
    (3) In furtherance of a business.
    (4) While carrying more than one passenger.
    (5) At night.
    (6) In Class A airspace.
    (7) In Class B, C, and D airspace, at an airport located in Class B, C, or D airspace, and to, from, through, or at an airport having an operational control tower unless you have met the requirements specified in 61.325.
    (8) Outside the United States, unless you have prior authorization from the country in which you seek to operate. Your sport pilot certificate carries the limit “Holder does not meet ICAO requirements.”
    (9) To demonstrate the aircraft in flight to a prospective buyer if you are an aircraft salesperson.
    (10) In a passenger-carrying airlift sponsored by a charitable organization.
    (11) At an altitude of more than 10,000 feet MSL or 2,000 feet AGL, whichever is higher.
    (12) When the flight or surface visibility is less than 3 statute miles.
    (13) Without visual reference to the surface.
    (14) If the aircraft:
    (i) Has a VHgreater than 87 knots CAS, unless you have met the requirements of 61.327(b).
    (ii) Has a VHless than or equal to 87 knots CAS, unless you have met the requirements of 61.327(a) or have logged flight time as pilot in command of an airplane with a VHless than or equal to 87 knots CAS before April 2, 2010.
    (15) Contrary to any operating limitation placed on the airworthiness certificate of the aircraft being flown.
    (16) Contrary to any limit on your pilot certificate or airman medical certificate, or any other limit or endorsement from an authorized instructor.
    (17) Contrary to any restriction or limitation on your U.S. driver's license or any restriction or limitation imposed by judicial or administrative order when using your driver's license to satisfy a requirement of this part.
    (18) While towing any object.
    (19) As a pilot flight crewmember on any aircraft for which more than one pilot is required by the type certificate of the aircraft or the regulations under which the flight is conducted.
    I think I answered my own question. 61.303 says "You do not have to hold any of the endorsements required by this subpart, but you must comply with the limitations in 61.315." 61.315 requires endorsements, but it's all part of the same subpart (J), so it appears that a PP flying as a SP (no medical) doesn't need any of the special endorsements for night, airspace, etc.

  10. #10

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    So I went flying Saturday and at 2300 RPM, in straight and level flight, got up to 102 mph. There was a slight tail wind of maybe 8 mph. So based on attaining the 102 mph and the 105 mph listed in the faa data, we went with the greater than 87 knots endorsement but it could probably go either way.

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