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Thread: Accelerated VS. Old Fashion Flight Training

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    Accelerated VS. Old Fashion Flight Training

    Do you think accelerated instrument flight training provides more, equal, or less value than regular "old fashion" flight training?

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    FlyingRon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glory Aulik View Post
    Do you think accelerated instrument flight training provides more, equal, or less value than regular "old fashion" flight training?
    I think if you can tolerate the pace of the accelerated program, it's an excellent plan. You don't go through as much learn-disuse-forget cycle. "Old school" or Accelerated" your instrument rating means nothing if you don't invest in the effort proficient (or at least current) at it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Glory Aulik View Post
    Do you think accelerated instrument flight training provides more, equal, or less value than regular "old fashion" flight training?
    Way more value, unless you've got a friend teaching you for free and he's only available on alternate Saturdays. I did my Instrument Rating in my COZY in 7 days, including the practical test. Commercial in 3 days, including the test. As Ron says, no time to forget stuff.

    Who goes to college for 3 days/month for 17 years? How much do you think you'd remember? Flying is the only training I can think of that does things with the "old fashioned" drip/drab methodology. It's ridiculous.

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    Concur with Marc. Other factors include the familiarity of the instructors with the current practical testing hoohah and having an examiner available when you're ready to test.

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    FlyingRon's Avatar
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    I should disclose that ten years ago I did the PIC course. For me, it was exactly what I wanted. I'd been studying instrument flight for over a decade. I had taken my written several times and let it expire but never booked more than a couple of flight lessons in a row.

    PIC was absolutely great. My instructor kept asking me if I thought the pace was OK. I asked why and he said that in the first time since he'd been doing this he thought that he was holding a student back. Anyway, I completed the course in 8 days, the eight being a mock checkride and filling out the IARCA, etc... The checkride was a breeze.

    As I said, you need to keep continually proficient. I'm actually one of those who doesn't tend to lose learned skills, but I can still tell when I'm on my game because I've practiced and when I've slacked off.

    Learn in the style that works well for you and your circumstances, but understand that instrument flight requires a time investment beyond just getting your certificate.

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    Auburntsts's Avatar
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    The material is the material no matter how its presented. The real question isn't which provides the better value, but rather which method suit's you better as a student. The accelerated programs are intense and the pace over 8-10 days isn't for everyone, but if you can carve out the time and drink from the firehose, it works. Conversely the traditional method works too -- thats the route I went because I used my GI Bill to pay for it so I was forced to use a part 141 program and none of the accelerated outfits (PIC, Gatts, etc) are 141. Also there is nothing stopping a student from going traditional and flying more than a few times a week to create their own hybrid accelerated program.
    Last edited by Auburntsts; 05-05-2016 at 02:10 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Auburntsts View Post
    Also there us nothing stopping a student from going traditional and flying more than a few times a week to create their own hybrid accelerated program.
    That's what I was thinking. I trained a lot of instrument students and we simply didn't limit training to 3 days a month. I'm probably "old fashioned" no matter how I do it.

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    Accelerated training

    I went to an accelerated school for my instrument ticket. We accelerated the accelerated program slightly and I flew over 7 hours a day for 5 days. On the sixth day we had to file to the airport where my DPE was and we had to file to get back to his home airport to drop him off. Then I had to file to get back to the airport where I had left my wife with her family for the week.

    We were IMC every day and the experience was akin to drinking from a fire hose. The fact that I was a 25 year air traffic controller in a busy approach control helped a lot. On the first day I called RDU on the remote frequency, obtained my clearance and release before we launched into a 700 foot overcast. I handled all of the comm with approach. Later that day my instructor told me that he usually handled the radios for the first couple of days. I didn't even have to think about that part since I had experienced it so long from the other end and that let me concentrate on the rest of it.

    I feel as long as someone has a good grasp on a handling radio communication with the approach control and is comfortable with it, the accelerated option would be a good way to go. It is definitely cheaper.

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