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Thread: Experienced Pilots

  1. #1
    Chick's Avatar
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    Experienced Pilots

    I ensured my instructors were older and very experienced. I really enjoy sitting around listening to the "Old Hands" talking about flying. I don't think it is necessary to re-invent the wheel. By listening to the people who have experience, I have learned a lot about flying without having to make every mistake in the book. I make plenty, as it is. What do you think is important to tell a new pilot ( just a couple hundred hours) that you wish someone had told you? Thanks, in advance, for your knowledge and willingness to share!

  2. #2

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    Read the book "Stick and Rudder".
    I reread the book about once a year to stay current with the facts of flight and the things that can kill you.
    Bill

  3. #3
    Chick's Avatar
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    Yes sir, Mr Berson. My instructor had me read that early on. It should be required for all pilots.

  4. #4
    Learn to feel the airplane and fly with your head outside the cockpit. Seems like the modern way of flight instruction is just prep for an instrument rating and stare at the glass panel. Don

  5. #5

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    I agree with Bill on "Stick and Rudder" I read it every spring! I wish I had known of it before I started my Flight Instruction, it really clears up "How an airplane flies"!

    Joe

  6. #6
    rosiejerryrosie's Avatar
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    "You don't have to take off, but you do have to land!"
    Cheers,
    Jerry

    NC22375
    65LA out of 07N Pennsylvania

  7. #7

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    Well, first up, there's my signature line. Expanded, it means, that if you're uneasy about something, your subconscious is desperately trying to get your attention. Listen to it and either satisfy it that there's nothing wrong or change the conditions that are making it try to talk to you. A good example might be if you're starting to think "I wonder if I should get gas at that airport." At that point, you've made a decision; act on it.

    This is one I like to tell my students, and I think it's important - it goes something like this:

    "You can't fly. I can't fly. Bob Hoover, Patty Wagstaff, name-your-hero can't fly. If you think you can fly, I'll happily sell tickets to have people come out and watch you run down the runway flapping your arms.

    "The aircraft flies. Most do a very good job of it. However, the aircraft is as dumb as a rock. It will happily fly into a mountain if you let it. You, on the other hand, are pretty smart. You think and have judgement. That's your job. That's what you're being trained for. Together, you and the aircraft make a great team."
    Last edited by Hal Bryan; 07-02-2012 at 03:26 PM. Reason: iPad did some odd sentence parsing
    Anxiety is nature's way of telling you that you've already goofed up.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by rosiejerryrosie View Post
    "You don't have to take off, but you do have to land!"
    As I told one inexperienced pilot that wanted to take off in the face of some pretty challenging weather (stuff that gave me pause): "Show me the emergency take off procedure for that airplane."

    He laughed and said that I had a pretty good point. I then thought about it and said "Y'know, being this close to Offutt, I realize that SAC had emergency take off procedures, but if they were using them, it would've been a pretty bad day for everyone..."
    Anxiety is nature's way of telling you that you've already goofed up.

  9. #9
    Chick's Avatar
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    This is exactly what I hoped for. I appreciate the knowledge you're sharing. I hope this continues. Thanks!

  10. #10

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    Try to practice something every time you fly, be it stalls, slow flight, crosswind landings, or something that you wouldn't normally do. If you get in the habit of seeking out the edges of the performance envelope you will recognize instinctively when you are getting close. You will be a better and more confident pilot and a lot less likely to become a statistic someday!

    Tony Johnstone, MCFI-A

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