Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 27 of 27

Thread: 91.307 Ambiguity

  1. #21
    rwanttaja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    1,722
    Quote Originally Posted by Byron J. Covey View Post
    No need to apologize to me .... I was just having some fun. I've never felt constrained by a forum thread topic.
    Mike's diversion didn't bother me, either. And it's covered by the Rules of the Internet!

    Sounds like it's time for another repost. See item #2.

    The Rules of the Internet – August 2015
    By Ron Wanttaja

    1. You will never get the last word. No matter how many arguments you make, no matter what insults or threats you post, someone will always come back with a response. When you’ve made your point, or it’s apparent the other person(s) aren’t going to be swayed by your arguments, stop.

    2. Thread drift happens. Your topic is going to morph well beyond what you can imagine. Accept it and don’t freak out.

    3. Posting anonymously is perfectly acceptable. However, the only respect you will earn is for your demonstrated *knowledge*. Anyone can claim to be an airline pilot or lawyer, but if you show you know the law or a particular airliner’s systems, people will treat you more seriously.

    4. Your anonymous “identity” is not *you*. If someone is insulting your online persona, they’re not insulting you, personally. But keep in mind there are a lot of smart people online; your true identity may not remain a secret.

    5. Remember that people rely on non-verbal clues to show what they’re thinking, and may not realize that the *lack* of such clues may cause others to interpret their statements in a darker way. In person, “What kind of idiot are you?” accompanied by a grin and a slap on the back is easily recognized as someone kidding. Yet the same words in an online message may raise hackles.

    6. No one is holding a gun to your head, forcing you to continue an unpleasant online discussion. If you stop, few will notice.

    7. You will be judged by what *you* say, not what people say about you. Someone can rant and spew insults about you, but if you keep your head, remain reasonable, and don’t reciprocate, most observers will have a negative view of the other individual. Take the high road; more will respect you.

    8. Humor is the best shield, but only when it’s used to deflect away from you, not towards your adversary. A pun or a joke on the situation, not directed at a person or group, shows you’re cool and may get some grudging respect from your adversary.

    9. Sarcasm is not humor. Not only is there the probability of escalating the flames, but you stand a good chance of looking like a real idiot if people don't realize your message as intended as sarcasm.

    10. Finally, the most important rule of the Internet: There ARE no rules to the Internet. It is anarchy; there’s nothing that compels action in anyone. The only behavior you can control is your own.

    Ron Wanttaja

  2. #22
    Byron J. Covey
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by rwanttaja View Post
    In person, “What kind of idiot are you?” accompanied by a grin and a slap on the back is easily recognized as someone kidding. Yet the same words in an online message may raise hackles.
    Now you tell me!

    Good rules Ron.


    BJC

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    4

    Definition of "normal flight"

    [QUOTE=Byron J. Covey;52427]Just an FYI. There are other definitions within the FARs for "aerobatics." I think that the may be three, but it has been a long time since I looked. One such example is here:

    §91.303 Aerobatic flight.

    No person may operate an aircraft in aerobatic flight—
    (a) Over any congested area of a city, town, or settlement;
    (b) Over an open air assembly of persons;
    (c) Within the lateral boundaries of the surface areas of Class B, Class C, Class D, or Class E airspace designated for an airport;
    (d) Within 4 nautical miles of the center line of any Federal airway;
    (e) Below an altitude of 1,500 feet above the surface; or
    (f) When flight visibility is less than 3 statute miles.
    For the purposes of this section, aerobatic flight means an intentional maneuver involving an abrupt change in an aircraft's attitude, an abnormal attitude, or abnormal acceleration, not necessary for normal flight.

    Byron,
    i was the proud owner of the first certificated Pitts S1S for 18 years.
    one of the questions I enjoyed asking FAA types was about a placard in the airplane, placed appropriately
    just above the throttle.
    it stated : "This airplane must be operated as an acrobatic category airplane".
    OK, I would ask, what is "normal flight" for an acrobatic category airplane?
    if I don't abruptly use the controls, fly in abnormal attitudes, etc. etc. am I in violation because I am not operating as an acrobatic category airplane?
    they would invariably ask for a copy of the placard, and I had one FAA guy at Oshkosh photograph the
    the placard in the airplane, and tell me it just means I had a poorly written placard.
    i asked if there was any way they could violate me for operating as an "acrobatic category airplane"
    other than using the catch all "careless and reckless?
    i had a lot of fun messing with them. One said he was taking it to OK City to use in the training of
    new Inapectors as a "gotcha" question.
    N9JT is still flying with her happy new owner. I hated to part with her, but age got in my way.

    Jim Klick

  4. #24
    Byron J. Covey
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by jimklick View Post
    Byron,
    i was the proud owner of the first certificated Pitts S1S for 18 years.
    one of the questions I enjoyed asking FAA types was about a placard in the airplane, placed appropriately
    just above the throttle.
    it stated : "This airplane must be operated as an acrobatic category airplane".
    OK, I would ask, what is "normal flight" for an acrobatic category airplane?
    if I don't abruptly use the controls, fly in abnormal attitudes, etc. etc. am I in violation because I am not operating as an acrobatic category airplane?
    they would invariably ask for a copy of the placard, and I had one FAA guy at Oshkosh photograph the
    the placard in the airplane, and tell me it just means I had a poorly written placard.
    i asked if there was any way they could violate me for operating as an "acrobatic category airplane"
    other than using the catch all "careless and reckless?
    i had a lot of fun messing with them. One said he was taking it to OK City to use in the training of
    new Inapectors as a "gotcha" question.
    N9JT is still flying with her happy new owner. I hated to part with her, but age got in my way.

    Jim Klick
    Interesting. I haven't flown a Type Certificated S-1S. Do they all have that, or was it just yours?


    BJC
    Last edited by Byron J. Covey; 01-08-2016 at 11:02 AM.

  5. #25
    RetroAcro's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Cary, NC
    Posts
    135
    Quote Originally Posted by Byron J. Covey View Post
    Interesting. I haven't flown a Type Certificated S-1S. Do they all have that, or was it just yours?


    BJC
    Hey Byron - the placard was a joke. If they came out of Afton that way, mine would be non-conforming and illegal. :-) Eric

  6. #26
    rwanttaja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    1,722
    I like the placard that says, "Straight and level flight prohibited."

    Ron Wanttaja

  7. #27
    Byron J. Covey
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by RetroAcro View Post
    Hey Byron - the placard was a joke. If they came out of Afton that way, mine would be non-conforming and illegal. :-) Eric
    Eric:

    Yeah, that is what I thought, but I've never met JK, so I thought that I would play it straight.

    How are things up there? You still at Raleigh East? How is the gang at 1114?


    BJC

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •