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Thread: What is your style of flight simming?

  1. #1

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    What is your style of flight simming?

    Are you an airline captain with PMDG products? A GA or Warbird pilot with A2A simulations products? A corporate pilot with Carenado products? Do you like scenery creation, repainting or even designing your own models?

    I'm interested in hearing what you all are interested in! I myself love the A2A Civilian Mustang and A2A's new Piper 250 Comanche! I even dabble a little bit in airport design and creating fictional airparks! I turned FL60 into my own private airpark!

  2. #2
    lnuss's Avatar
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    I'm GA. A friend and I (I flew tow plane and instructed for him 40 plus years ago) get together every weekend and fly multiplayer, using mumble/murmur (open source) to chat while flying (he's in Dallas, I'm in Denver). Sometimes it's formation flying, sometimes exploring the ORBX scenery (gorgeous), even looking for small, out of the way airports, or perhaps putting on an airshow for each other. We have bought/downloaded a variety of aircraft for FSX (now Prepar3d), so sometimes it's a Christen Eagle or L-19 or Cub, and sometimes An L-39 or MS-760, but most frequently it's the Carenado Baron, though there are a number of others, too, for variety.

    Due primarily to health, neither of us is current in real aircraft, but simming helps.

    Larry N.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by lnuss View Post
    I'm GA. A friend and I (I flew tow plane and instructed for him 40 plus years ago) get together every weekend and fly multiplayer, using mumble/murmur (open source) to chat while flying (he's in Dallas, I'm in Denver). Sometimes it's formation flying, sometimes exploring the ORBX scenery (gorgeous), even looking for small, out of the way airports, or perhaps putting on an airshow for each other. We have bought/downloaded a variety of aircraft for FSX (now Prepar3d), so sometimes it's a Christen Eagle or L-19 or Cub, and sometimes An L-39 or MS-760, but most frequently it's the Carenado Baron, though there are a number of others, too, for variety.

    Due primarily to health, neither of us is current in real aircraft, but simming helps.
    When I am unable to fly for what ever reason, I get my aviation fix using FSX. How nice you have a friend to share this with. What kind of computer do you run this on? Meaning processor and speed, along with video card. Do you use multi screens or just one? What about cockpit controls? I would take it at least you have a joystick with rudder peddles. But anything else?

    I would like a gaming computer and might buy or build me one. Now that FSX is no longer making this product I can build a computer to run this program with all settings set to highest and not worry about them coming out with another version that will take an even more powerful computer. In other words, I can get this new computer for this flight sim. and it should work for this for years to come.

    Right now I just have a quad core laptop to run FSX on. It does it but its not the most enjoyable.

    Tony

  4. #4
    lnuss's Avatar
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    My current machine is five years old, Tony, but it's a core I-7 960 at 3.2 GHz (put together by Digital Storm) with 12GB RAM and an nVidia GTX 570 card. It's adequate for FSX at mild-to-mid display settings (depending on the area) with few add-ons (I use ORBX and UTX (Ultimate Terrain 10, provides roads, lakes, rivers, etc. much improved)), but even then in big city areas the frame rate (therefore smoothness) drops a lot. I get MUCH better performance from Lockheed Martin's Prepar3D program, since it make very good use of the graphics card, unlike FSX, and still is somewhat (not completely) backwards compatible with FSX, since it uses the same basic sim engine (enhanced, of course). It's also smoother, even at lower frame rates.

    For FSX you'll want the most processor you can afford, but can get by with a mild graphics card. For Prepar3d (P3D for short), you'll want a pretty decent DX11 (or later) capable graphics card (most are, these days).

    Might I also suggest that you visit flightsim.com to gain some perspective and, perhaps, some ideas as well, even help when needed. They also have thousands upon thousands of downloadable add-ons (most for free), as well as evaluations of a lot of payware, even links to where you can get it. There are other fs sites out there, too.

    Larry N.

  5. #5
    Mayhemxpc's Avatar
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    I use X-plane on my Mac and FS on my legacy Compaq to stay up on instrument procedures. Set up the approach, brief the approach, and fly it on the sim -- then do the same in the plane. Foreflight works with X-plane, which allows me to stay sharp on using my EFB. There is no way that I could stay reasonably competent with the G-1000 in the limited time I get to fly one for CAP, so hooking up a G1000 simulator to X-plane keeps me from being a complete embarrassment when I get into a NAVIII airplane.
    Chris Mayer
    N424AF
    www.o2cricket.com

  6. #6

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    Very cool Mayhem!!

  7. #7
    falcon21's Avatar
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    I have updated my local airport to be more realistic and I've added a few private strips. It makes the game feel more real when you start to recognize things. I generally stick to low and slow aircraft. I've logged hundreds of hours when I was younger but now I'm focusing more on real flying

  8. #8

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    Not quite simulation...more like emulation.


    I think it's good training. The machine exists in the real world. Yet the expense and hazards are almost equivalent to computer based simulation.

    This mode of RC flying closely emulates manned flight quite well, good for introducing basic airmanship, and aeronautical concepts.
    We should incorporate some of this video technology into manned aviation training programs. Imagine how much safer it would be to train in a single seat airplane, to have a student initially observe from the ground, and later once the student gets in the plane solo, have a "safety pilot" or the instructor, observe from the ground.

    Last edited by Scrtsqrl; 02-02-2016 at 05:18 PM.

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