Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 60

Thread: Sport Flight Instructors

  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    290
    Quote Originally Posted by ransfly View Post
    Hi JB,
    I am a SP flight instructor. I have had a private pilot ASEL for about 21 years, before I got the instructor rating. I have just recently started instructing at a local flying club that has an SLSA X-air. I currently have 2 students. I think that there are 2 major problems for a sport pilot instructor-1. Finding an SLSA aircraft to instruct in, and 2. Any student that wants to go further(i.e. Private), the solo hours will count, but the dual hours will not apply for a private ticket. John Weber
    And 3. the weight limits of a SLSA will limit you to light weight students if you are more than the standard 170 pound SP-CFI. 4. Will your students be able to find an examiner willing to give check rides in the SLSA the students use.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    1,604
    What I find interesting about SP, the FAA allows certain ways of training and not one CFI-SP will train that way. Example single seat training. The Practical test standards spell out how this is done. But no one is willing to do it.

    Its like the LODA. They offer it but no one will get one, well two places got one, but no one else will ever get one. If you believe different you try and get one and see what happens then report back.

    Tony

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    2,410
    Tony, could you give us pilots of normal sized airplanes a simple explanation of what the rules are, without too much ax grinding, and maybe a simple version of what you think the rules ought to be?

    As far as I know, if you want to fly a small thing like I think a Quicksliver might be one, that is a very light 3 axis control plane with usually fabric wings, a simple engine like we used to see so many of at the small airstrip at the south end of Oshkosh or east side at SUN N FUN; that you can fly one without being involved with FAA at all. Maybe I am wrong about this, but do you want the FAA involved in this? That way is more expense and more red tape, but maybe some extra safety.

    As for having hours in this type apply toward a private license, maybe you ought to be able to apply some hours, maybe 5 or 10 for the most basic and if the plane is a new type LSA, say a Gobosh, mabye 20 hours should be able to apply. Still to safely fly a full size certiifed airplane, some amount of training in that type should be done.
    I think anything that can get more people into gen av at the bottom end, if done safely would be great. There are some people who start in the ultralight area, and do move into reg airplanes, like JFK JR. who was CFI for powered parachutes.
    But for most pilots there isn't much movement up.
    My impression is that many if not most guys at the ultralight level are there because it is cheaper, and I know many if not most gen av pilots look upon the ultralights as too far from normal, maybe not as safe or at least not as useful.

    I used to go down to the small airstrip ever year and beg or barter my way to a ride in one of these ultrlights, and had a lot of fun doing it, but haven't in a few years.
    Last edited by Bill Greenwood; 01-01-2015 at 09:56 AM.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    1,604
    Bill we have those airplanes in the 300-500 lb range that are just as simple as the quicksilver you speak of. I never once mentioned having these hours apply towards a PPL. I am speaking SP. Get the practical test standards for Sport Pilot, its spelled out in black and white. No need for any " ax grinding " of any kind.

    Tony

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    2,410
    Well, Tony I am not sure what you mean by 300 lb airplanes and don't really understand what you are getting at, but it really doesn't matter since I am not involved in that area. Just thought it might be of interest. Have a good New Years anyway.

    And John Weber wrote of having hours apply to ppl.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    1,604
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Greenwood View Post
    Well, Tony I am not sure what you mean by 300 lb airplanes and don't really understand what you are getting at, but it really doesn't matter since I am not involved in that area. Just thought it might be of interest. Have a good New Years anyway.

    And John Weber wrote of having hours apply to ppl.
    300 lbs airplanes. I believe you know this Bill.

    https://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/...&hsimp=yhs-001

    Single-Seat Aircraft Practical Test Applicants for a Sport Pilot Certificate may elect to take their test in a single seat aircraft. The FAA established in 14 CFR part 61, section 61.45(f) specific requirements to allow a practical test for a Sport Pilot Certificate only. This provision does not allow a practical test for a Flight Instructor Certificate or Recreation Pilot Certificate or higher to be conducted in a light-sport aircraft that has a single-pilot seat. FAA-S-8081-2910With certain limitations, the practical test for a Sport Pilot Certificate may be conducted from the ground by an examiner. The examiner must agree to conduct the practical test in a single-seat aircraft and must ensure that the practical test is conducted in accordance with the sport pilot practical test standards for single-seat aircraft. Knowledge of all TASKs appli
    cable to their category/class of aircraft will be evaluated orally.Single-seat sport pilots shall demonstrate competency in those specific TASKs identified by a NOTE in the AREA OF OPERATION for a single-
    seat practical test and any other TASKs selected by the examiner. Examiners evaluating single-seat applicants from the ground shall evaluate only those TASK elements that can be accurately assessed from the ground. The examiner must maintain radio contact with the applicant and be in a position to observe the operation of the aircraft while evaluating the proficiency of the applicant from the ground.
    Sport pilots taking the practical test in a single-seat aircraft will have the limitation, “No passenger carriage and flight in a single-pilot seat aircraft only” placed on their pilot certificate, per 61.45(f)(3),limiting their operations to a single-seat light-sport aircraft and no passenger carriage will be authorized.Only an examiner is authorized to remove this limitation when the sport pilot takes a complete practical test in a two-place light-sport aircraft. This practical test may be conducted in the same or additional category of aircraft.Upon successful completion of the practical test, the limitation will be removed, and the sport pilot is authorized to act as pilot in command in all categories of light-sport aircraft that he or she has a make and model endorsement within a set of aircraft to operate. The limitation can also
    be removed if the sport pilot completes the certification requirements in an aircraft with a minimum of two places, for a higher certificate or rating.



    Jump down to the bottom of page 9 and you will find this info.

    http://www.faa.gov/training_testing/...-s-8081-29.pdf

    Tony
    Last edited by 1600vw; 01-10-2015 at 07:59 AM.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    1,604
    Quote Originally Posted by 1600vw View Post
    What I find interesting about SP, the FAA allows certain ways of training and not one CFI-SP will train that way. Example single seat training. The Practical test standards spell out how this is done. But no one is willing to do it.

    Its like the LODA. They offer it but no one will get one, well two places got one, but no one else will ever get one. If you believe different you try and get one and see what happens then report back.

    Tony

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    1,604
    Now that we agree one can indeed get their certificate in a single seat airplane, I wonder why no cfi will offer this for a person who flies such an aircraft? Seems like an easy way to make some money and have nothing out of pocket but time.

    It could play out like this:
    CFI to student
    Get in your airplane and fly out to the practice area. I will be there waiting radio in hand. Once you get there I want you to do XYZ. After you are done we will meet back at the airpark or airport what have you.

    The first CFI and student to do this will go down in Sport Pilot Aviation history.

    Tony

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    1,604
    With what we have today in FPV units, a CFI could use one of these along with a handheld and even complement this type training and certification even more. Technology has really opened up this type of training then just having the CFI standing on the ground looking up at said student.

  10. #20
    lnuss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    181
    I wonder why no cfi will offer this for a person who flies such an aircraft? Seems like an easy way to make some money and have nothing out of pocket but time.
    I wouldn't want the responsibility, nor would I want to be involved in allowing the risk for someone without being able to affect any bad outcome. It has nothing to do with money. And I had that attitude way back when I was a new CFI -- it's MUCH worse in today's litigious society, in addition to the wondering how I would live with myself if something went wrong. There's also a limit to how well you can judge someone's performance remotely, compared to being right there.

    If you want to get your CFI and offer this type of training, have at it, though.

    Larry N.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •