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Thread: Annual condition inspection sign-off

  1. #1
    Byron J. Covey
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    Annual condition inspection sign-off

    Is there any special / favored wording for a repairman (not an A&P) to use when signing-off the annual condition inspection on an Experimental - Home Built?

  2. #2

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    Yes you will find this wording I believe in your operating limitations.

    I certify that this aircraft has been inspected on________ in accordance with the scope and detail of appendix D part 43 and was found to be in a condition for safe operation.

    The entry will include the aircraft Total time in service and name and signature , and certificate type and number of the person performing the inspection.

  3. #3

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    Sorry what I posted was for an A&P....

    Nothing is need to do any repairs on a experimental. No log book entry is needed.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1600vw View Post
    Sorry what I posted was for an A&P....

    Nothing is need to do any repairs on a experimental. No log book entry is needed.
    The repairman will sign the condition inspection just as the A&P would. The wording will be the same. This is if you hold the repairman certificate for said airplane.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Byron J. Covey View Post
    Is there any special / favored wording for a repairman (not an A&P) to use when signing-off the annual condition inspection on an Experimental - Home Built?
    As Tony says, the statement from the operating limitations is copied verbatim into the record, signed/dated/etc.

  6. #6
    Byron J. Covey
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    Thanks guys.

  7. #7
    steve's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1600vw View Post
    The repairman will sign the condition inspection just as the A&P would. The wording will be the same. This is if you hold the repairman certificate for said airplane.
    I thought the A&P would declare the airplane "airworthy" whereas the repairman finds the airplane in "a condition for safe operation."

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve View Post
    I thought the A&P would declare the airplane "airworthy" whereas the repairman finds the airplane in "a condition for safe operation."
    No declaration of airworthiness required.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve View Post
    I thought the A&P would declare the airplane "airworthy" whereas the repairman finds the airplane in "a condition for safe operation."
    Nothing about an experimental is airworthy. This is why doing a Condition inspection is such a non event for the A&P. Meaning his neck is not on the line like an Annual. The condition inspection is just saying the airplane is in good condition for operation. The A&P is not saying its an airworthy airplane. He is saying its an aircraft in CONDITION for safe operation.

    The one who said the airplane is airworthy is the FAA when they gave it its airworthy certificate. All the A&P or repairman is saying is that aircraft is in as close to the same Condition it was in when this airworthy certificate was issued. Nothing more or nothing less.

    In the history of aviation an A&P has NEVER been sued over a Condition Inspection. The reason is in the wording of the certificate. He is not saying its an airworthy airplane. The FAA did that. He is saying its inn a safe condition for Operation. Huge difference then an Annual.

    I am amazed how many A&P's do not know this. I would say 80-90% are not aware that this is the rules for an Experimental aircraft. On the airplane I fly today, the first Condition inspection that had to be done after I purchased her, was signed by an IA who signed it just as an Annual. This IA did not know all I needed was an A&P for this condition inspection nor did he know the wording needed to write my condition inspection.

    I was told by a man in the FAA, that if he see's this log book entry as this IA wrote it, this FAA person would be calling this A&P "IA" and explaining the FAR's to him. He was not happy to hear this is how A&P's where handling these Condition Inspection. Today I know better and will never let an A&P"IA" sign my log book as an Annual inspection. First I will not use an IA for my Condition Inspection, That gives you that deer in the headlight look from a lot of A&P's that are not IA's. They are not use to signing log books and you will be hard pressed to find one who will. They all believe their world will come to an end if they do indeed sign this log book and you crash. This is so far from the truth its funny.

    The in's and out's of the Condition inspection.

  10. #10

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    This will give you all the info you need on this subject. Everyone should watch and listen to this that are involved with Experimental AB Aircraft from owners to A&P's and IA's.

    http://www.eaavideo.org/video.aspx?v=2608772875001
    Last edited by 1600vw; 10-05-2014 at 05:49 AM.

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