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Thread: Rebuilding a certified engine??

  1. #1

    Rebuilding a certified engine??

    Fellow EAA'ers-

    In reading around the web, I've seen some people say that they've rebuilt a certified engine (say, an O-200), instead of building a Corvair or VW conversion, or instead of paying a shop to do this (I assume). Can you do this and still have the blessing of the FAA?

    Thanks.

  2. #2

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    In an experimental you are free to do what whatever you want (for the most part, there are some limitations).
    If the rebuilt engine is for a certified airplane, the engine will need to be overhauled and signed off either by an A/P or a Part 141 shop. (I think it is A/P, but might be an IA)

    Tim

  3. #3
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    If the use of a certificated engine is the basis for a shorter phase I test time, then the engine has to be maintained as a certificated engine (i.e. by an A&P). If it's not maintained as a certificated engine, then anybody can work on it. At least that's the way it used to work.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by brian_thomas View Post
    Fellow EAA'ers-

    In reading around the web, I've seen some people say that they've rebuilt a certified engine (say, an O-200), instead of building a Corvair or VW conversion, or instead of paying a shop to do this (I assume). Can you do this and still have the blessing of the FAA?
    If you build a homebuilt, you can rebuild whatever engine you choose to install. Consider yourself blessed.

  5. #5

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    Any A&P can rebuild an engine. That is part of what the "P" means. And I will mention that Part 141 is flight schools not engine overhaul facilities.

    So an individual can work with an A&P to tear down and rebuild an engine. You need to know the A&P really well and do it in his or her shop so that they can supervise and sign-off the work. If you can do this you should finish with a certificated engine that can go on any airplane.

    I will note that the Lyco and Continental overhaul manuals assume that you already know what you are doing and know the "tricks" of the trade, plus have the special tools that make some of the more complicated assembly operations go smoothly. So if you want a reliable engine, you really want to work with an A&P who builds engines. There really is no other support system for a homebuilder who wants to rebuild an engine locally. An alternative is to go to something like the Superior Air Parts Build School. But otherwise it is really really tough to build up a good engine by just reading the book. And you will be the first guy to the scene of the accident...

    Even if you just tear an engine down and your friendly neighborhood A&P does the assembly while you hand him or her tools, you learn a huge amount about the internals of your engine. And when you fly, you should have lots of confidence in it. Definitely a worthwhile process to do.

    Best of luck,

    Wes
    N78041

  6. #6

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    This is why once you install a certified engine on something not certified it can not go back on a certified airplane, not without a complete tear down and inspection.

    Tony

  7. #7

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    Only true if you fail to maintain the engine, and keep the paperwork up to date, to certificated engine standards. If I install a certificated engine on my homebuilt, keep up with AD's, log the maintenance and annual inspections, then it remains a certificated engine. Stop doing those items and you have a problem. But then why ignore AD's and inspections, which are for the safety of the owner and pilot? It is much more expensive to recover from a crash than to skip AD's and inspections.

    I take care of my engine. It takes me places I want it to bring me back from. Hiking or swimming is not attractive.

    So to get back to the original poster's question, most A&P's are completely capable of rebuilding a small engine like an O-200. And many will work with you to make a rebuild a learning experience and maybe lower the out of pocket $$.

    Best of luck,

    Wes
    N78PS

  8. #8

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    Wes,

    Correct. I was thinking 145. Certified Repair Station.

    Tim

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    Used to be a AP could not split the case only an AI, that no longer true?

  10. #10

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    Clarification, WLIU, when you write "keep the paperwork up to date to certified standards."

    Let's say I have a certified engine and perform my own conditional inspections that may involve an A&P's help (checking compression, say, or even substantial work) but not his signature - doesn't it fail certified standards?

    The same with AD's. As the repairman of my plane I see an AD is issued on the magneto and perform the work myself, and sign off in the logbook that I did it. Does the FAA recognize it as in compliance, even though I'm not an A&P? Heck, forget the FAA, would an A&P recognize it as being done, or would he go back, double check, and then sign his own name saying the AD was satisfied?

    In the Experimental world it's a "who cares," but in the thought exercise that someone was going to take my engine and put it on a certified engine it might be a whole different matter.
    The opinions and statements of this poster are largely based on facts and portray a possible version of the actual events.

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